How Much Birth Control Would Cost Under The AHCA #birth #control,


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Here’s How Much Your Birth Control May Cost Under AHCA

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The American Health Care Act. the GOP health care plan that aims to repeal and replace Obamacare, has narrowly passed in the House, and currently awaits a vote in the Senate.

The controversial bill has been met with considerable pushback, as it would ultimately leave 24 million Americans without health insurance by 2026, according to an analysis from the Congressional Budget Office.

Should the legislation pass, women are poised to face especially complex challenges when it comes to accessing birth control, which has been covered by Obamacare thanks to the “birth control benefit .”

The Affordable Care Act requires insurance plans to cover all Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved methods of birth control for women without having to pay any out-of-pocket costs.

Under the AHCA, however, women would no longer be able to reap any of those benefits.

While Republicans may view a woman’s access to birth control as a “nitty-gritty detail ” in crafting health care legislation, any woman of child-bearing age can assure you the issue is far from trivial.

Let’s talk about how much each contraceptive method actually costs when you pay out-of-pocket.

While the prices vary depending on the circumstances, for most brands, a pack of birth control pills (which typically provides a month’s worth of contraception) can cost as much as $50 .

However, it’s important to remember that only 17 percent of women who use a form of birth control are taking the pill.

The intrauterine device, or IUD, is another commonly used method, though it demands a much steeper price out-of-pocket.

Popular IUD brands like Mirena and Kyleena can cost anywhere between $500 and over $800 .

Similarly, a birth control implant can set you back $800 without insurance .

Unfortunately, the prices aren’t much kinder on your wallet as you make your way through the rest of the viable birth control options. Without insurance, you could pay up to $250 for the Depo-Provera shot. and $80 a month for the Nuvaring .

Mind you, these costs don’t even factor in the doctors’ visits to obtain these prescriptions, nor the follow-up visits, all of which do not come free without insurance.

So, what about Planned Parenthood?

Fortunately, clinics like Planned Parenthood provide amazing resources to women seeking forms of contraception but lack the health insurance to pay for it.

Not so fortunately, the latest version of AHCA plans to nix federal funding of the organization and bar patients from using any Medicaid dollars to access treatment at Planned Parenthood clinics.

To put this in perspective, in 2015, approximately 43 percent of Planned Parenthood’s budget. or around $500 million, came from federal grants and reimbursements, according to NPR.

Moreover, 60 percent of Planned Parenthood’s federal funding comes from Medicaid and Title X reimbursements for preventative and primary care, which includes not only birth control, but cancer screenings. as well.

Even if the AHCA manages to garner enough votes in the Senate, this does not mean Planned Parenthood will vanish overnight.

But they will lose a huge chunk of their funds, and we as patients could see an extremely alarming drop in the quality of their services.

Plus, according to the Government Accountability Office, approximately 390,000 women could lose access to preventative care. and as many as 650,000 women would receive reduced preventative care.

Cecile Richards, president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America, discussed the potential impact of the GOP health care plan in the following statement:

This is the worst bill for women’s health in a generation. This disastrous legislation once again makes being a woman a pre-existing condition; ‘defunds’ Planned Parenthood; guts maternity coverage; strips 24 million of their health insurance; lets insurance companies charge people with pre-existing conditions exorbitant rates; forces new moms back to work shortly after giving birth; and reduces access to contraception.

In short, this bill makes it harder to prevent unintended pregnancy, harder to have a healthy pregnancy, and harder to raise a family. Alarm bells should be ringing in every house across America.

Richards urges the Senate to “ listen to the American people and reject the worst bill for women’s health in a generation.”

While it’s up to your health care provider whether or not to cover birth control, and some states, like New York. have made a plan to continue making coverage mandatory, the Trump administration has made it painfully clear that women’s health is at the bottom of their priority list.

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Why Guys Need To Go On More Man Dates


30/09/2017

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Visible Embryo Home Page #pregnancy, #fetal #development, #childbirth, #baby, #birth, #childbirth,


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The Visible Embryo is a visual guide through fetal development from fertilization through pregnancy to birth. As the most profound physiologic changes occur in the first trimester of pregnancy, these Carnegie stages are given prominence on the birth spiral.

The shape and location of embryonic
internal structures and how they
relate and are connected to each
other is essential to understanding
human development. Medical
professionals create a mental picture
of this process in order to determine
how well the fetus is progressing. It is
also the basis of knowing how and when
errors in development occur and if a
possibility exists for a corrective
intervention.

It is equally important for expectant
parents to understand the relationship
of these internal structures and how
their infant develops through pregnancy.

Creating the images for The Visible Embryo, included capturing data from slides and three dimensional structures on fetal anatomy in The National Institutes of Health, Carnegie Collection of embryos. as well as from 3D and 4D ultra sound images.

Disclaimer: The Visible Embryo web site is provided for your general information only. The information contained on this site should not be treated as asubstitute for medical,legal or other professional advice. Neither is The Visible Embryo responsible or liable for the contents of any websites of third parties which are listed on this site.


26/09/2017

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Cerebral Palsy Effects and Conditions Quick Facts #cerebral #palsy #effects, #conditions,


Cerebral Palsy Effects and Conditions Quick Facts

Cerebral palsy is a group of conditions caused by brain damage that affects a child’s ability to control movement and posture. Depending on the area and severity of the brain injury, a child who has cerebral palsy may also develop other effects and conditions. These problems may include:

  • Muscle tightness and spasticity this cerebral palsy effect affects a majority, but not all, people with this condition, adversely affecting movement and coordination. There are cerebral palsy treatments available to manage muscle contractures and spasticity.
  • Difficulty moving or involuntary movements This can include disturbances in gait, balance, coordination, walking, staying still, and more depending on an individual’s condition and the affected areas of the brain.
  • Mental Retardation It has been estimated that about one-third of children with cerebral palsy are of average intellect, one-third may be mildly impaired, and one-third are classified as mentally retarded.
  • Learning disabilities
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder ADD may be more common in children with cerebral palsy.
  • Seizure Disorders Approximately one out of every three children with cerebral palsy may develop epileptic seizures.
  • Skeletal Problems Over half of children with cerebral palsy will develop contractures. muscle shortening in the limbs, and scoliosis. a curvature of the spine. Both conditions can be treated.
  • Vision Impairment More than three out of four children with cerebral palsy develop strabismus. a problem in which the eyes are not aligned causing poor vision.
  • Dental problems A lot of children with cerebral palsy have a lot of dental problems including a high number of cavities, which may be because they have more difficulty brushing their teeth.
  • Hearing impairment Some children with cerebral palsy may experience full or partial hearing loss as a result of severe jaundice during the first few days of a baby’s life.
  • Trouble Swallowing this can increase the risk of choking on saliva and other complications.
  • Speech Impairment speech may be difficult to understand due to poorly control muscles involved in producing speech.
  • Bladder and Bowel Movement Problems Poor bladder control (incontinence) due to motor impairments can result in bedwetting, urination during physical activity, or a leaky bladder.
  • Breathing Difficulties because of postural problems
  • Feeding trouble the muscles used for feeding may be impaired in people with cerebral palsy. This can lead to malnutrition and troubles with development and growth.
  • Skin disorders- skin problems can arise because of pressure sores

03/09/2017

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Birth Defects Testing-Topic Overview #birth #defect, #birth #defects, #cf, #congenital #defect,


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Birth Defects Testing – Topic Overview

What are birth defects tests?

Birth defects tests are done during pregnancy to look for possible problems with the baby (fetus ). Birth defects develop when something is wrong with genes or chromosomes. an organ, or body chemistry. A birth defect may have only a mild impact on a child’s life, or it can have a major effect on quality of life or life span.

Birth defects include:

What are the types of tests?

There are two types of birth defects tests: screening and diagnostic.

  • Screening tests show the chance that a baby has a certain birth defect. It can’t tell you for sure that your baby has a problem. If the test result is “positive,” it means that your baby is more likely to have that birth defect. So your doctor may want you to have a diagnostic test to make sure. If the screening test result is “negative,” it means that your baby probably doesn’t have that birth defect. But it doesn’t guarantee that you will have a normal pregnancy or baby.
  • Diagnostic tests show if a baby has a certain birth defect.

Screening tests for birth defects are blood tests and ultrasounds. The blood tests are used to look for the amount of certain substances in your blood. The doctor uses an ultrasound to look for certain changes in the baby. Diagnostic tests involve taking some of the baby’s cells to look at the genes and chromosomes.

No test is 100% accurate. A test may be negative even when the baby has a birth defect. This is called a false-negative test result. It’s also possible that a test will be positive-meaning the test result is abnormal-but the baby does not have the problem. This is called a false-positive test result .

You may have only first-trimester tests or only second-trimester tests. Or you may have an integrated test. This test combines the results of tests you have in your first trimester and second trimesters.

Continued

Should you have birth defects tests?

Pregnant women and their partners can choose whether to have a test for birth defects. For example, you may want to have tests to know if there is a problem so you can work with a doctor and hospital to care for your baby after birth. Or you may want to have tests because you wouldn’t want to continue the pregnancy if there is a serious problem. Some women might decide not to have these tests because they would continue the pregnancy regardless of the results.

Talk to your doctor about tests that are available where you live and which tests might be best for you.

If you choose to have a test, you also may want to talk with a genetic counselor. The counselor can talk with you about the reasons to have or not have the test. He or she can also help you find other resources for support and decision-making.

Deciding about testing can be a hard and emotional choice. You need to think about what the results of a test would mean to you and how they might affect your choices about your pregnancy.

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information. © 1995-2015 Healthwise, Incorporated. Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated.

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19/08/2017

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OBGYN Of Lancaster #obgyn #of #lancaster, #obgyn #lancaster #pa, #obgyn #of


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OBGYN Doctors Dedicated to Women’s Healthcare Needs in Lancaster, PA

Located next to Lancaster Women’s & Babies Hospital in Lancaster, PA, Lancaster Physicians for Women is a unique OBGYN practice dedicated to the healthcare needs of women of all ages.

Our board-certified OBGYN physicians don’t simply treat patients – we understand them. That’s because our physicians aren’t just doctors. We’re women, too!

Our philosophy emphasizes individualized obstetrical and gynecological care with a high regard for our patients’ needs and preferences. Our doctors value open communication with our patients and encourage a team approach to making decisions.

Contact us to schedule your first appointment at our Lancaster, PA office and see the difference we can make for you!

Lancaster Physicians for Women accepts most insurance plans. Please call our office if you wish to verify that we accept your particular coverage. We’re happy to help!

Contact Us

LANCASTER PHYSICIANS FOR WOMEN
694 Good Drive Suite 203
Lancaster, PA 17601

Phone: (717) 544-3788
Fax: (717) 544-3789

Make an Appointment

If you would like to request an appointment please call our office at (717) 544-3788 and we will be glad to help you. For general practice questions you may call us or fill out the

In a Medical Emergency

If you have a medical concern, please call our office as we cannot offer medical advice via this website. After hour calls will be directed to our answering service and forwarded to our physician on call.

2017, Lancaster Physicians for Women. All Rights Reserved.


06/08/2017

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Cerebral Palsy #cp, #cerebral #palsy, #wheelchair, #crutches, #congenital #disorder, #birth #defect,


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Cerebral Palsy

Maybe someone at your school has cerebral palsy — or perhaps you have it and you’ve been dealing with it your whole life. As we become more aware of appearance and body image. it can be tough to be in a wheelchair or to have people tease you about the way you walk. But lots of teens with CP don’t let it hold them back. They do just what everyone else does.

What Is Cerebral Palsy?

Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the brain. Normally, the brain tells the rest of the body exactly what to do and when to do it. Because of how CP affects the brain, a person might not be able to walk, talk, eat, or move the way most people do.

CP affects a person’s muscle tone and ability to coordinate body movements. People with CP have trouble controlling their muscles. How a person is affected all depends on what part of the brain is involved.

How Does Cerebral Palsy Affect People?

The three types of cerebral palsy are:

  1. Spastic (pronounced: SPASS-tik) CP is the most common type of CP. People with spastic CP can’t relax their muscles or the muscles may be stiff.
  2. Athetoid (pronounced: ATH-uh-toid) CP affects the ability to control the muscles of the body. A person’s arms or legs may flutter and move suddenly.
  3. Ataxic (pronounced: ay-TAK-sik). People with ataxic CP have problems with balance and coordination. Their movements may seem shaky.

People with CP can have mild cases or more severe cases. It all depends on how much of the brain is affected and which parts of the body that section of the brain controls. If CP affects both arms and both legs, a person might need to use a wheelchair. If CP only affects the legs, someone may walk in an unsteady way or have to wear braces or use crutches.

If CP affects the part of the brain that controls speech, a person with CP might have trouble talking clearly or not be able to speak at all. Some people with CP also have learning disabilities or behavior problems, though many don’t have these issues. Others can have medical problems like seizures or epilepsy. or hearing impairment.

What Causes It?

In most cases, doctors don’t know exactly what causes CP. They do know that it’s the result of damage to the brain — either while a baby is in the womb or in the first few months or years after the baby is born.

Babies have a higher chance of having CP if they are born early or if they’re very underweight at birth. Babies who don’t get enough oxygen during or right after birth also have a higher chance of having CP. So do babies who need to be on a ventilator (a machine to help with breathing) for several weeks or more after birth.

CP is not contagious, so people can’t catch it from other people. Even a mother with CP can’t pass it on to her unborn baby.

What Do Doctors Do?

Doctors diagnose CP when kids are young, so by the time people reach their teens, they usually know they have CP and are used to living with it.

With CP, the problem with the brain will not get any worse as people get older. For example, someone who has CP that affects only the legs won’t develop CP in the arms or have problems with speech later on.

Although CP doesn’t get worse over time, how it affects someone’s body can change as the person grows or develops. For example, some teens with CP may develop dislocated hips (when the bones that meet at the hips move out of their normal position) or scoliosis (curvature of the spine).

Because CP affects people differently, there are lots of ways to treat and manage it. Some teens have only mild problems with movement. Others need crutches or wheelchairs to get around. Doctors, parents, teachers, therapists, and the person with CP all work together to develop the best treatment plan.

Teens with CP may work with these experts:

  • a pediatric orthopedist
  • a developmental pediatrician who looks at how the person is growing or developing compared with other teens
  • a pediatric physiatrist (or rehabilitation physician), who helps kids with disabilities of many kinds
  • therapists, like physical therapists to help with movement, occupational therapists to help with skills like handwriting, and speech therapists

Some teens with CP take medicines to relax their muscles (in the case of spastic CP) or to help control seizures. And some might have special surgeries to keep their arms or legs straighter and more flexible.

Coping With Cerebral Palsy

Puberty can be especially challenging for people with CP. Rapid growth can cause weight gain and clumsiness in any teen, but can make it even more difficult for someone with CP to move around. A person’s muscles can become tighter as the bones grow, which can restrict movement even more.

If you have CP, what you’ll do depends on your CP. One thing you can do is to get more involved in your medical care wherever possible. Keep up with your appointments, including any physical or other therapy visits. This is a time when your medical team will want to keep an eye on you and adapt your treatment or therapy as you grow.

Many guys and girls with CP can do the same sorts of things that other teens do, like enjoying extracurricular activities, listening to or playing music, hanging out with friends, reading, going to the mall, and dating, to name just a few.

Helping a Friend Who Has CP

If you know someone who has CP and you’re wondering how to help, just treat that person the way you would anyone else. Some people with CP might need extra assistance once in a while, like when reaching for something. Help out — just as you would with anyone else — without making a big deal about it. If you can’t understand what a person with CP is saying or if it takes longer to do things, give him or her extra time to speak or move.

And don’t be afraid to talk to a friend about what it’s like to live with CP. Everyone wants to fit in, and being in a wheelchair or having other physical problems can make someone self-conscious or feel left out. So if you know someone with CP, try to be welcoming and include him or her in what you’re doing.

Date reviewed: August 2015


06/07/2017

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How soon can I travel after birth? Post-birth Recovery #european #travel

#travel soon
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How Soon Can I Travel After Birth?

Postbirth Recovery

When am I going to be well enough to travel after giving birth?

If you’re itching to visit far-flung friends and relatives with your new baby. or if being housebound as a new mom is making you want to get out of town, like now. there’s no hard-and-fast rule about when you’re allowed to fly. How soon you travel after giving birth is really up to how you’re feeling. Some new moms feel almost like their old selves within a few days (it’s okay to hate them), while others are still having aches and pains for a while afterward. If you get a c-section, you’ll likely be in the longer-recovery category.

You should check with your OB to make sure it’s okay to travel if you’ve had any complications, but it’s even more important that you get the go-ahead from baby’s pediatrician. That’s because baby’s immune system is still developing, and there’s a high risk of him catching something harmful in those early months.

Keep in mind, if you do hop a flight soon after delivery, that there’s a high risk for blood clots that’s associated with pregnancy — and it persists for six to eight weeks postpartum. So take extra care to drink lots of water and to get up and walk around often during a long flight. Wearing special support hose to promote circulation can also help.

Plus, more from The Bump:

By Laura Riley, MD, ob-gyn, Director of Labor and Delivery at Massachusetts General Hospital and author of You amp; Your Baby: Pregnancy





16/06/2017

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How soon can I travel after birth? Post-birth Recovery #travel #conditions

#travel soon
#

How Soon Can I Travel After Birth?

Postbirth Recovery

When am I going to be well enough to travel after giving birth?

If you’re itching to visit far-flung friends and relatives with your new baby. or if being housebound as a new mom is making you want to get out of town, like now. there’s no hard-and-fast rule about when you’re allowed to fly. How soon you travel after giving birth is really up to how you’re feeling. Some new moms feel almost like their old selves within a few days (it’s okay to hate them), while others are still having aches and pains for a while afterward. If you get a c-section, you’ll likely be in the longer-recovery category.

You should check with your OB to make sure it’s okay to travel if you’ve had any complications, but it’s even more important that you get the go-ahead from baby’s pediatrician. That’s because baby’s immune system is still developing, and there’s a high risk of him catching something harmful in those early months.

Keep in mind, if you do hop a flight soon after delivery, that there’s a high risk for blood clots that’s associated with pregnancy — and it persists for six to eight weeks postpartum. So take extra care to drink lots of water and to get up and walk around often during a long flight. Wearing special support hose to promote circulation can also help.

Plus, more from The Bump:

By Laura Riley, MD, ob-gyn, Director of Labor and Delivery at Massachusetts General Hospital and author of You amp; Your Baby: Pregnancy





24/03/2017

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