Expository Counseling Training Center #expository, #counseling, #center, #nouthetic, #nanc, #certified, #houston,


#

Expository Counseling Training Center

Expository Counseling Training Center is the training portion of the Expository Counseling Center. ECTC (Expository Counseling Training Center) seeks to provide online and onsite based training for Biblical Counseling. ECTC provides 5 basic biblical counseling training courses that are developed by Dr. Nicolas Ellen. Each l evel of teaching is 14 weeks in length. There are also outside class readings, Scripture memorization, make-the-connection assignments, and case studies. Tuition is $350 per Level. The 5 basic biblical counseling training courses developed by Dr. Ellen have been recognized by the Association of Certified Biblical Counselors and are used by an ACBC Training center (The College of Biblical Studies in Houston, Texas) as part of their process to move individuals into ACBC certification.

Since the Expository Counseling Center respects and appreciates The Association of Certified Biblical Counselors (also known as ACBC), the ECC provides a 6 week training to prepare individuals to take the ACBC exams (which must be passed in order for one to move into ACBC certification), and 12 hours of counseling observations for individuals pursuing ACBC certification (10 hours is required in order for one to move into ACBC certification). Since Dr. Nicolas Ellen is a Fellow with ACBC, The Expository Counseling Center offers counseling supervision via Dr. Ellen for those entering phase 3 of the ACBC certification process. Tuition for the ACBC Exam Prep is $150 and $500 for phase 3 ACBC supervision. (Go to http://www.biblicalcounseling.com/ to find out more about their process for biblical counseling certification).

The Expository Counseling Center also respects and appreciates The International Association of Certified Biblical Counselors. So much so that the ECC is a certified training center with the International Association of Biblical Counselors (Go to www.iabc.net to find out more about their process for biblical counseling certification). The Expository Counseling Center has been sanctioned by the IABC to lead individuals into complete biblical counseling certification with their organization via The Expository Counseling Training Center. The ECTC will provide the biblical counseling training via the 5 basic biblical counseling courses developed by Dr. Nicolas Ellen and provide the theology and counseling exams which are produced by the IABC. ECTC will also grade the exams, and provide the 50 hours of supervision via Dr. Nicolas Ellen, in order to certify individuals as IABC Biblical Counselors. Tuition for IABC Exam Prep is $150 and $350 for IABC counseling supervision.

You will be able to purchase most of your course material through the ECC online bookstore.

In this level, students will learn the connection between systematic theology and biblical counseling. Students will evaluate the doctrine of God, Christ, Holy Spirit, Man, Sin, Salvation, Sanctification, various others doctrines and learn how genuine biblical counseling comes out of these doctrines. Students will also learn the history of the biblical counseling movement in the United States.

(14 Weeks) Tuition is $350

In this level, students will learn the basic principles of Biblical Counseling and be able to distinguish it from secular counseling and counseling that integrates psychology and the Bible. Students will learn how the Bible has it s own framework by which we can address any and all non-organic problems from the Scriptures. This includes those issues that the world would describe as psychological or mental disorders. Students will learn how to analyze issues from a biblical framework, categorize issues through a biblical framework, and provide biblical solutions through a biblical framework.

(14 Weeks) Tuition is $350

In this level, students will explore issues such as the fear of man, idolatrous lust, depression, divorce, separation, abuse, remarriage, death, trials, suffering, psychotropic drugs, biblical view of self esteem, dealing with the past and many other issues and learn to deal with them from a biblical perspective.

Level Four:Marriage and Family Basic Training Course

(14 Weeks) Tuition is $350

In this level, students will learn the foundations for marriage and family as God designed. Students will explore God’s design for marriage as well explore some basic parenting skills.

Level Five: The Dynamics of Biblical Counseling

(14 Weeks) Tuition is $350

In this level, students will learn the mechanics of biblical counseling. Students will observe 12 hours of biblical counseling as well as do some case studies. Students also will learn concepts of biblical analysis, categories of biblical change, phases and stages of biblical change, and categories of homework for counselees. Moreover, students will learn policies and procedures for governing a counseling ministry, how to use a personal data inventory form, how to use a consent to counsel form, how to organize and structure a counseling session as well as how to fill out a case report form after a session.

(6 Weeks) Tuition is $150

Students will go through each question on the ACBC Exam and learn how to answer those questions. Students will learn which resources are available to answer each question. Students will learn how to cite their sources for the answers they find from those sources provided by the training.

(6 Weeks) Tuition is $150

Students will go through each question on the IABC Exam and learn how to answer those questions. Students will learn which resources are available to answer each question. Students will also learn how to cite their sources for the answers they find from those sources provided by the training.

Students will spend 2-3 hours in class listening to a lecture and participating in small group interactions pertaining to the course. During this class time students will be able to ask questions and discuss matters pertaining to the course.

Outside Class Reading

The students will be required to read John, Hebrews, Romans, James, 1 John, 1 Peter, Ephesians, Proverbs, 2 Peter, and Galatians. Students will also be required to read The Heart of Man and The Mental Disorders. Deceptive Diagnosis. Understanding and Developing a Biblical View of Life. Instruments in the Redeemer’s Hand. So You Want to Get Married (for singles), Happy Even After (for married couples), Shepherding a Child’s Heart. With All Your Heart. Coming to Know and Walk with God. How People Change. Pursuing Godliness through the Disciplines of the Christian Faith. Every Christian a Counselor. Peacemaker. The Biblical Counseling Movement. Theology of Christian Counseling. Counseling by The Book (Revised and Expanded Edition). Why Christians Can’t Trust Psychology and A Theology of Biblical Counseling:The Doctrinal Foundations of Counseling Ministry (Heath Lambert).

Students will memorize 16 Scripture verses to enhance their counseling.

Make-the-Connections and Case Studies

In order to teach students how to analyze problems through a biblical framework and to categorize problems through a biblical framework, students will be given 50 make-the-connection assignments over the course of study. These assignments will challenge the student’s skill in connecting various characteristics to a biblical framework. Students will be assigned 30 counseling cases over the entire training period to teach them how to analyze, categorize and solve problems from a biblical framework perspective.

50 hours of counseling supervision via Dr. Nicolas Ellen, will be provided for IABC students and for students in Phase 3 of ACBC certification. This will entail filling out case report forms and counseling logs, tape recording five of one’s counseling sessions to be listened to by Dr. Ellen for evaluation of one’s skill, discussing the dynamics of various counseling cases, and developing in biblical counseling methods through the 50 hours of supervision.

Attached below is a syllabus that lays out the details of each course.

Most of the curriculum for each level can be purchased online through our bookstore. The syllabus for the course will let you know what books you need for each level and when you need them. (Review the syllabus for more details.)

Special Offer To Churches

For a limited time, we have a special offer to churches who are interested in this program. Please contact us for more information.


25/08/2017

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Online travel agencies are not evil – but they are bad

#online travel agencies
#

Online travel agencies are not evil – but they are bad business

Jul 23.2014

Great industries are built on great partnerships, and the hospitality sector is no different.

The US hospitality industry, for example, has been built on the partnership of hotel brands and franchisees. In addition, successful partnerships enable growth for all stakeholders, which has been the case for hotel brands and owners over the last quarter-century.

NB: This is an analysis by Vikas Bhakta, founder and CEO of Ve-Go Technologies .

Since the Great Recession of 2009-2010, online travel agencies have held an increased role in the hospitality industry for room distribution.

But, unlike the successful partnership forged between hotel brands and owners, despite what others have said here on Tnooz. I believe OTAs have engaged in business practices that negatively affect not only the hotel industry, but also the communities travelers we serve.

Tax obligation

When consumers purchase a hotel room, there is a hotel occupancy tax associated – yes, the same hotel occupancy tax AirBnb is currently reviewing with regulators.

In the US, hotel occupancy tax is split between state and local and is a major source of revenue for government budgets.

The table below reflects the difference in tax obligation between OTA bookings, such as Expedia, Hotels.com, or Priceline vsersus traditional and direct hotel bookings:

NB: * refers to room rate (estimated for ease of calculation) ** refers to occupancy tax and fees : mid-range; set by governments, parity by OTAs

Magically, the OTA loophole of deducting commission before calculating tax obligation yields a difference of $3 – which would normally serve as revenue for state and local governments, is now padding OTA bank accounts and profit margins.

With our 15% occupancy tax assumption, every $100 travelers’ spend with Expedia, Hotels.com or Priceline, equals a loss of $3 for state local communities – and a direct profit for OTAs.

In 2013, OTAs are estimated to have accounted for $40B in US hotel sales, if we assume all bookings were paid through OTAs, it would equal $1.2B in annual state local tax revenue shortfall due to the bad business practices of OTAs.

Over the past few years, plenty of US state and local governments have taken the OTA tax remittance loophole to trial, yet few have prevailed .

Even more alarming is the vigorous fight and enormous bankroll OTAs employ to fight against state local governments in courtrooms across America. If you collect full taxes, but fail to remit…

It’s not a loophole, it’s bad business.

Guest experience

According to a 2012 JD Powers report. travelers who book on OTAs rated their experience 45 points lower than guests who booked or called the hotel directly.

In many instances, the lack of flexibility offered with OTA rates creates friction between hotels and their guests.

As a front desk agent, I have personally experienced guests who would like to modify/cancel their stay, but due to the lack of flexibility in OTA rate rules – we were forced to have unhappy travelers stay with us.

OTAs should ensure the entire travel experience is memorable – not simply prey on booking commissions then deliver inferior customer service along the way.

Consumers who argue OTAs ability to aggregate hotel listings has provided a huge benefit for search booking – I would agree with them 100%.

But, JD Powers North American Hotel Guest Satisfaction Index Study states travelers who book on OTAs are more likely to report problems – I’ve known more than my fair share of hoteliers who say LRA (Last Room Available) has a different meaning for OTA guests.

Unfortunately, no hotelier aspires to provide inferior service to OTA guests, they would much rather provide great service and be compensated fully for their effort. When guest experience suffers due to the distribution model…

It’s not a better distribution solution, it’s bad business.

AdWords marketing

OTAs, in their simplest form, are websites with outsized marketing budgets. which are paid for by outsized booking commissions.

For example, Priceline and Expedia two of the biggest overall spenders with Google – combine to account for $2.5 billion in annual spend on Google AdWords.

OTAs bid on hotel names to compete with hotels and drive up marketing costs for hotels, while simultaneously increasing distribution costs as each booking displaced to OTAs entails a significantly higher customer acquisition cost for the hotel.

Today, OTAs operate globally at scale and possess marketing budgets that surpass the largest of global hospitality brands.

In addition, OTAs operate with the ability to undercut savvy marketers with fewer resources. If OTAs out-bid you on AdWords, on your own hotel name…

It’s not superior marketing, it’s bad business.

The Billboard Effect

In 2010, hoteliers were led to believe OTA presence would lead to an increase in overall bookings, as well as direct bookings. At face value, more bookings and more revenue seem great, but as plenty have found, an increase in bookings and top line revenue does not always translate to profits.

In fact, HAMA HotelAVE published their findings on profit reduction due to OTA payment structure.

In particular, the Expedia Partner Preference program has been found to decrease profitability for hotel owners. This begs the question: what are the risks associated with OTA bookings eroding profit?

Incremental revenue at the expense of profit undermines a hotels’ ability to deliver quality product service on a daily basis, as well as invest in refurbishments capital expenditures on an on-going basis. If incremental revenue erodes profit…

It’s not incremental, it’s bad business.

Risk versus Reward

For hotel owners, the worst business practice employed by OTAs is the commission structure: 15-30%. For decades, the industry-standard for distribution commission has been 10% – at that commission fee, all partners can succeed without endangering the other’s ability to grow and expand.

Since 2010, OTAs have experienced a meteoric rise in share of bookings; in turn, hotel owners have experienced a reduction in profit margin, relative to top line revenue increase.

In other words, OTAs are eroding the profitability experienced by hotel owners during previous economic expansion cycles – and in some cases, OTAs have eclipsed profits margins of hotel owners.

Coming off the worst recession in the history of the US hotel industry, owners expect the greatest reward, for bearing the greatest risk – owning the real estate.

But, OTAs, and their irrational commission fees, have changed the risk/reward relationship for hotel owners.

As good investors do, when risk outweighs reward, they find somewhere else to invest.

For example, as the US hotel industry exceeds 2008 Occupancy, ADR, and REVPAR levels and nears the peak of the cycle, construction activity fails to match previous cycles – with a 50% reduction in new rooms opened 2014 YTD .

Furthermore, secondary tertiary markets – with the exception of Oil Gas markets – have almost non-existent supply growth when compared to previous cycles.

Muted supply is considered healthy for the economics of current hotels – but comes at a loss for travelers seeking more options at competitive prices. If the risk of building a hotel is greater than the reward, hotel owners stop building hotels…

It’s not rocket science, it’s bad business.

For most industries, distribution costs are marginal, at best. Amazon  has built an empire by lowering distribution costs for a number of verticals.

Their margin is our opportunity.

Amazon prides itself on lowering prices for consumers, by lowering distribution costs. Conversely, OTAs are increasing prices for travelers, by increasing distribution costs.

Today’s OTAs may be a necessary evil. but with the explosion of smartphones, mobile apps, and open APIs – the possibilities are endless for tomorrow’s mobile travel agencies





24/08/2017

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5 Games for the Road: How to Pass the Time With

#travel games for adults
#

5 Games for the Road: How to Pass the Time With Nothing But Your Fellow Travelers for Entertainment

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Bus and train trips, flights, delays in airports and train stations, hostels without TV or much light; the list of situations where a traveler has time to kill is long. That’s right — travel is not always exciting. There will be dull downtimes, and you may not always be able to read a good book. play road trip bingo, do crossword puzzles, or doodle in your journal .

That’s when you need a good repertoire of games to spontaneously play with your fellow travelers. Some will be popular games that you can find online and long-forgotten games from your childhood, and you might be surprised just how necessary they’ll be — and how much fun you’ll have — when you want to fill some of those inevitably empty hours on the road.

A quick confession: I’m a bit of a game geek anyway, and an English teacher to boot, so I’ve been known to start these games even at parties. But I promise that they have all been road tested on a real road, somewhere in Tunisia, Finland, Canada or Germany or any place where I was bored and without a book.

#1 I Spy

You’ve probably all played I Spy a long time ago, but I recommend dredging it back up from your long-term memory. If you can’t, it starts off like this: “I spy, with my little eye, something beginning with A”, and the other players have to guess what object you can see. I’ve played this in hostels (especially those hostel living rooms that have trinkets from all over the world gathering dust there), on train rides and in planes, but it didn’t work too well in the desert. “I spy sand.”

How to play: I like to limit each person to three or four guesses. Otherwise, they’ll exhaust every item in the room that starts with “B” and you’ll soon run out of objects to use. I also like the jet lag variation — play it in a dark room at night when you can’t sleep because your body’s on some other clock, and see if you can actually remember what’s in the room around you.

Mariano Kamp

#2 Donna’s Alphabet Game

This is not the official name, but it’s the way I like to remember it after my old school friend Donna got a car load of us playing this on a stop-start motorway in southwest England. It’s simple, as long as you’re traveling on a road with signs (and even better, advertising) and these signs use our alphabet. Don’t try it in the western provinces of China, for example.

How to play: Logically, Donna’s Alphabet Game starts with A. Be the first person to spot the letter “A” in a sign and yell out the word: “A is in motorwAy!” Continue with B and get right through to Z. It sounds easy, but there will be a few tricky letters, and if you’re playing in a non-English speaking country then pronouncing the words will be a lot of fun, too. The way we play, there’s no winner — anybody can scream out the next letter when they see it — but natural competitiveness spurs everybody on anyway.

#3 Stadt, Land, Fluss: City, Country, River

This game has a German name because my German friends taught it to me — which is also perhaps why it always strikes me as being a bit intellectual, but still a lot of fun. It’s also a highly appropriate game for travelers to play because their geographical knowledge should be a bit better than average.

How to play: Choose three or four categories like the names of a city, country, river or lake. To be honest, I’m terrible with rivers so I always change the river category to something completely different — often food, because I like to talk about food. Take it in turns to challenge another player to think of a city, country and river all starting with a particular letter. If your friend challenges you with “D”, for example, you can win by getting out Dubai, Denmark and Danube in under sixty seconds — or whatever time limit you and your bored mates decide on.

Question Mark Art, Stuttgart Museum of Art -bast-

#4 Twenty Questions

An oldie but a goodie, and you can make it topical by restricting the choice of “What am I?” to be something related to the region in which you’re traveling. I did have a friend, though, who would choose objects like “pyramid” while traveling through Egypt or “chocolate” in Switzerland, and then we could have made it just two questions rather than twenty.

How to play: Someone chooses an object, and everyone else asks them questions about it, but the only permitted answers are “Yes” or “No”. (Or in my rules, “irrelevant”, if I think saying yes or no will send the guessers along a completely wrong path I like to play fair!). If you’re playing with a group, whoever guesses the item correctly can choose the next word.

#5 For RTW Trippers: Kalgoorlie, Balladonia

I think it was my father who started this game when our family took a driving holiday across Australia. We were gone about two months and my sister and I, being about ten and twelve years old, needed a lot of entertainment.

How to play: This game only works with your traveling companions, and only on long trips. It’s more of a challenge than a game, but it always works for me. Simply start with the name of the town you stayed in first. On our trans-Australia trip, it was the gold mining town of Kalgoorlie. You then try to name every other town you’ve stayed in, in chronological order. My sister and I were experts at this all those years ago, but today I can only remember the first and second stops.

There are tons of other word and guessing games you can play in those bored moments of travel, and you can adapt these games with endless variations, too. And while it might seem like just a way to kill time, playing games like these is something I really love about traveling. It’s almost as if we don’t give ourselves permission to have that kind of fun if we’re at home in our “real lives”.

Anyway, I’m very keen to learn some new games, too, so leave your favorite travel game tips in the comments. I promise to road test them soon.





31/07/2017

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Online travel agencies are not evil – but they are bad

#online travel agencies
#

Online travel agencies are not evil – but they are bad business

Jul 23.2014

Great industries are built on great partnerships, and the hospitality sector is no different.

The US hospitality industry, for example, has been built on the partnership of hotel brands and franchisees. In addition, successful partnerships enable growth for all stakeholders, which has been the case for hotel brands and owners over the last quarter-century.

NB: This is an analysis by Vikas Bhakta, founder and CEO of Ve-Go Technologies .

Since the Great Recession of 2009-2010, online travel agencies have held an increased role in the hospitality industry for room distribution.

But, unlike the successful partnership forged between hotel brands and owners, despite what others have said here on Tnooz. I believe OTAs have engaged in business practices that negatively affect not only the hotel industry, but also the communities travelers we serve.

Tax obligation

When consumers purchase a hotel room, there is a hotel occupancy tax associated – yes, the same hotel occupancy tax AirBnb is currently reviewing with regulators.

In the US, hotel occupancy tax is split between state and local and is a major source of revenue for government budgets.

The table below reflects the difference in tax obligation between OTA bookings, such as Expedia, Hotels.com, or Priceline vsersus traditional and direct hotel bookings:

NB: * refers to room rate (estimated for ease of calculation) ** refers to occupancy tax and fees : mid-range; set by governments, parity by OTAs

Magically, the OTA loophole of deducting commission before calculating tax obligation yields a difference of $3 – which would normally serve as revenue for state and local governments, is now padding OTA bank accounts and profit margins.

With our 15% occupancy tax assumption, every $100 travelers’ spend with Expedia, Hotels.com or Priceline, equals a loss of $3 for state local communities – and a direct profit for OTAs.

In 2013, OTAs are estimated to have accounted for $40B in US hotel sales, if we assume all bookings were paid through OTAs, it would equal $1.2B in annual state local tax revenue shortfall due to the bad business practices of OTAs.

Over the past few years, plenty of US state and local governments have taken the OTA tax remittance loophole to trial, yet few have prevailed .

Even more alarming is the vigorous fight and enormous bankroll OTAs employ to fight against state local governments in courtrooms across America. If you collect full taxes, but fail to remit…

It’s not a loophole, it’s bad business.

Guest experience

According to a 2012 JD Powers report. travelers who book on OTAs rated their experience 45 points lower than guests who booked or called the hotel directly.

In many instances, the lack of flexibility offered with OTA rates creates friction between hotels and their guests.

As a front desk agent, I have personally experienced guests who would like to modify/cancel their stay, but due to the lack of flexibility in OTA rate rules – we were forced to have unhappy travelers stay with us.

OTAs should ensure the entire travel experience is memorable – not simply prey on booking commissions then deliver inferior customer service along the way.

Consumers who argue OTAs ability to aggregate hotel listings has provided a huge benefit for search booking – I would agree with them 100%.

But, JD Powers North American Hotel Guest Satisfaction Index Study states travelers who book on OTAs are more likely to report problems – I’ve known more than my fair share of hoteliers who say LRA (Last Room Available) has a different meaning for OTA guests.

Unfortunately, no hotelier aspires to provide inferior service to OTA guests, they would much rather provide great service and be compensated fully for their effort. When guest experience suffers due to the distribution model…

It’s not a better distribution solution, it’s bad business.

AdWords marketing

OTAs, in their simplest form, are websites with outsized marketing budgets. which are paid for by outsized booking commissions.

For example, Priceline and Expedia two of the biggest overall spenders with Google – combine to account for $2.5 billion in annual spend on Google AdWords.

OTAs bid on hotel names to compete with hotels and drive up marketing costs for hotels, while simultaneously increasing distribution costs as each booking displaced to OTAs entails a significantly higher customer acquisition cost for the hotel.

Today, OTAs operate globally at scale and possess marketing budgets that surpass the largest of global hospitality brands.

In addition, OTAs operate with the ability to undercut savvy marketers with fewer resources. If OTAs out-bid you on AdWords, on your own hotel name…

It’s not superior marketing, it’s bad business.

The Billboard Effect

In 2010, hoteliers were led to believe OTA presence would lead to an increase in overall bookings, as well as direct bookings. At face value, more bookings and more revenue seem great, but as plenty have found, an increase in bookings and top line revenue does not always translate to profits.

In fact, HAMA HotelAVE published their findings on profit reduction due to OTA payment structure.

In particular, the Expedia Partner Preference program has been found to decrease profitability for hotel owners. This begs the question: what are the risks associated with OTA bookings eroding profit?

Incremental revenue at the expense of profit undermines a hotels’ ability to deliver quality product service on a daily basis, as well as invest in refurbishments capital expenditures on an on-going basis. If incremental revenue erodes profit…

It’s not incremental, it’s bad business.

Risk versus Reward

For hotel owners, the worst business practice employed by OTAs is the commission structure: 15-30%. For decades, the industry-standard for distribution commission has been 10% – at that commission fee, all partners can succeed without endangering the other’s ability to grow and expand.

Since 2010, OTAs have experienced a meteoric rise in share of bookings; in turn, hotel owners have experienced a reduction in profit margin, relative to top line revenue increase.

In other words, OTAs are eroding the profitability experienced by hotel owners during previous economic expansion cycles – and in some cases, OTAs have eclipsed profits margins of hotel owners.

Coming off the worst recession in the history of the US hotel industry, owners expect the greatest reward, for bearing the greatest risk – owning the real estate.

But, OTAs, and their irrational commission fees, have changed the risk/reward relationship for hotel owners.

As good investors do, when risk outweighs reward, they find somewhere else to invest.

For example, as the US hotel industry exceeds 2008 Occupancy, ADR, and REVPAR levels and nears the peak of the cycle, construction activity fails to match previous cycles – with a 50% reduction in new rooms opened 2014 YTD .

Furthermore, secondary tertiary markets – with the exception of Oil Gas markets – have almost non-existent supply growth when compared to previous cycles.

Muted supply is considered healthy for the economics of current hotels – but comes at a loss for travelers seeking more options at competitive prices. If the risk of building a hotel is greater than the reward, hotel owners stop building hotels…

It’s not rocket science, it’s bad business.

For most industries, distribution costs are marginal, at best. Amazon  has built an empire by lowering distribution costs for a number of verticals.

Their margin is our opportunity.

Amazon prides itself on lowering prices for consumers, by lowering distribution costs. Conversely, OTAs are increasing prices for travelers, by increasing distribution costs.

Today’s OTAs may be a necessary evil. but with the explosion of smartphones, mobile apps, and open APIs – the possibilities are endless for tomorrow’s mobile travel agencies





17/04/2017

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Egypt travel update: Holiday company cancels Egypt tours until October but

#travel to egypt
#

Holiday companies cancel Egypt tours until October as violence continues, but Sharm el Sheikh remains open for business

Published: 11:03 GMT, 9 July 2013 | Updated: 14:31 GMT, 9 July 2013

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Adventure holiday companies are implementing the mass cancellation of trips to Egypt over the next couple of months as violence continues to grip the country following the ousting of President Mohammed Morsi.

Adventure holiday companies Explore! and Exodus have cancelled scores of planned trips in response to updates from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) which advises against all but essential travel to Egypt, except for resorts in the Red Sea region.

Explore! has cancelled all holidays to the country until October 5, while Exodus has cancelled tours until the end of September. Both companies are also monitoring the situation.

Unrest: As protests and violence continue following the ousting of President Mohammed Morsi, travel companies are cancelling scores of tours

Exodus is currently contacting customers to inform them of the decision and is also offering travellers who are worried about Egypt trips they have booked for later in 2013 the chance to transfer to an alternative holiday for no extra fee.

Fir its part, Explore! has issued a statement saying: “The UK Foreign Office has advised against all but essential travel to most of Egypt. Consequently we have taken the decision to cancel all Explore tours due to depart prior to October 5, 2013, and our Reservations team has contacted customers due to depart within this period to discuss cancelling or transferring their bookings.

“Moving forward we will be reviewing the situation in Egypt on a weekly basis and will be looking at tours departing after 06 October 2013 and informing customers accordingly over the coming weeks.”





09/02/2017

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