Expo 67 – Main Index to Pavilions, Themes, etc, canada travels.#Canada

canada travels

Canada travels

Expo 67 in Montreal

A photo collection about Canadas Centennial Celebration!

“Set a good example for the world. If you are excellent, if you are of high quality, the world will imitate you.”

Canada travels

Photo credit: © A. John Robinson and is used with permission with our sincere thanks.

Canada travels

Expo 67: 40th Anniversary Celebrations Edition

Canada travels

Photo credit: Diane Morin at Flickr.com. Click on the image for

“Expo 67: 40th Anniversary Celebrations Edition” of history and special events.

Canada travels

“The cannonade of fireworks which marked the opening of Expo. may in retrospect turn out to have been one of those rare moments that changed the direction of a nation’s history. This is the greatest thing we have ever done as a nation and surely the modernization of Canada — of its skylines, of its styles, its institutions — will be dated from this occasion and from this fair. The more you see of it, the more you’re overwhelmed by a feeling that if this is possible, that if this little sub-arctic, self-obsessed country of 20,000,000 people can put on this kind of show, then it can do almost anything.”

— Syndicated journalist Peter C. Newman of the Toronto Star, April 28, 1967, opening day at Expo 67.

“Still, Expo is regarded as the best world’s fair ever. Its success changed the world’s view of Canada, and more importantly, it changed the way Canadians viewed themselves. For the first time the country basked in the pride and the glory of its talents and accomplishments. A nation had come of age.”

— CBC reporter Raj Ahluwalia, from his book: “We Interrupt This Program.” Publisher Winding Stair Press, 2002.

“When the lights go out for the last time, when the crowds have left the pavilions and the avenues, a World Exhibition begins a new life. Less glittering but more profound, this new life is nourished in the souls of those who visited the Exhibition, and it will blossom into a legend for generations to come.”

— Pierre Dupuy, Commissioner General of Expo 67. Quoted from “E xpo 67 Montreal Canada”, the large memorial coffee table book. Publisher Toronto: Thomas Nelson, 1968.

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Canada travels

Our exclusive audio interview with Yves Jasmin, O.C.,

Director of Information, Public ity and Public Relations for Expo 67

Canada travels

Canada travels

If you are using a “hi-speed modem” from work, these images should download within mere seconds. However, general downloading times based on “home dial-in” without using “hi-speed” can vary from 5-15 seconds but are well worth the wait.

The asterisk before some of the titles indicates Private Pavilions at Expo 67. The rest without using the asterisk are International; National; Provincial or State and Theme Pavilions found at the fair.

Unless otherwise indicated, the text write-ups on the various Expo Pavilions and themes were culled directly from the “Expo 67 Official Guide.”

Canada travels

Canada travels

Expo 67: Additional Points of Interest

Canada travels

Whether it be small or big contributions to this Expo 67 web site, the following people shared their equal enthusiasm in making this project possible with my sincere thanks:

Man and His World

Canada travels

A very well thought out academic proposal submitted by the “Expo 2017 team.” It is a proposal for Montr é al to host another world’s fair in 2017.

Copies of the proposal are available to read in French and English. Click on the language of your choice for more details.

The “Expo 2017” website was officially launched on May 07, 2007.

Citizens of Montr é al and residents across Canada wishing to support the proposal are encouraged to contact Montr é al Mayor Gerald Tremblay by e-mail.

Canada travels

Canada travels

A new organization takes aim at preserving the legacy of Expo 67 including artefacts and to recall its lessons and benefits from the event.

The Expo 67 Foundation was officially launched on May 29, 2010. Click on the logo to enter their website.

Canada travels

Canada will be participating at the Shanghai China World Exposition to be held from May 1 to October 31, 2010.

The logo design (the middle drawing in the above illustration) depicts “the image of three people – you, me, him/her holding hands together, symbolizes the big family of mankind” writes the Shanghai World Exposition website.

Coming off of their highly successful Beijing 2008 Summer Olympic Games, no doubt China has raised the bar very high on themselves. One can expect that the Chinese will attempt to equal or surpass the accomplishments of Expo 67. Organizers are expecting 200 participants and 70 million visitors to their world exposition!

For further information, please follow the link to the official Government of Canada website: Canada at Expo 2010 Shanghai.

Click here for 138 exclusive photographs of Expo 2010 as photographed by Jason Stockl of Montreal and who eventually met up with Montreal Mayor Gerald Tremblay in Shanghai during the same week that Jason had been attending.

China Radio International has an informative website on the subject called: Charm of a City – 2010 Shanghai Expo .

Canada travels





07/02/2018

Posted In: NEWS

Tags: ,

Leave a Comment

The Long Travels of La Corriveau – s Cage – Atlas

The Long Travels of La Corriveau s Cage

For centuries, the ghost of Marie-Josephte Corriveau has been haunting the cultural consciousness of Quebec, Canada. To many, the legend of La Corriveau is a ghost story, of a woman hanged for murder, her corpse put on display as a gruesome warning. But the story of La Corriveau and the gibbet in which she was hanged are based on real historical events, and after over a century away, the actual cage has made its way back home. As a result, Corriveau s legacy has lately been shifting from folk tale to historical tragedy.

Marie-Josephte Corriveau was born in 1733, in what was at the time, a country called New France, which, by the time of her death, was controlled by the British. The British forces were completely unorganized, says Sylvie Toupin, a curator at Quebec s Mus e de la Civilisation, which currently holds Corriveau s infamous gibbet. There were many tensions because it was a new government, and the people weren t happy with what was happening. Ultimately, Corriveau would become a dire symbol of this frustration and disorganization.

At the age of 16, she was married to a local farmer. He died in 1760, leaving her alone with three children to care for. However Corriveau quickly found another husband, marrying Louis tienne Dodier, another farmer from her parish, less than two years after the death of her first husband. But he wasn t long for the world either.

Canada travelsLa Corriveau s Cage as it appeared in a 1916 Essex Institute catalog. BeatrixBelibaste/Public Domain

Dodier turned up dead in January of 1763. Corriveau and Dodier s marriage was the talk of the town, and not in a good way. Her father, Joseph Corriveau, had a number of very public fights with Dodier over property and business dealings, and Marie had petitioned, unsuccessfully, to leave her husband, on the grounds that he was physically abusive.

So when Dodier was found dead in their barn, initially thought to have been the result of being kicked in the head by a horse, the rumors about town soon turned the focus of the investigation to murder. Dodier s wounds were reexamined and determined to have been caused by something closer to a pitchfork than horse hooves, and both Joseph and Marie were accused of murdering the man.

After an initial trial before the military, Joseph was found guilty of Dodier s murder and Marie was found guilty of being an accomplice. But when Joseph was sentenced to hang for his crimes, he cracked, telling the court that in fact his daughter had committed the murder, and that he hadn t turned her in only because trying to keep her from the gallows. When questioned about this shocking turn of events, Marie finally admitted to killing Dodier with a hatchet.

Likely embarrassed by the initial wrongful conviction, and possibly influenced by fresh questions about her first husband s death that were now being whispered about by locals, the British authorities in charge of the province at the time held a speedy, cursory second trial. It was a military trial, because they were not equipped to hold a civil trial, says Toupin. They surpassed their given powers because the king in England did not give the final approval. They sentenced Marie not only to hang, but for her body to be gruesomely displayed in a metal gibbet as a warning. She was hanged in April of 1763, and her body was placed on public display for about five weeks in nearby Pointe L vis.

Canada travelsAn illustration of La Corriveau s ghost attacking an unwary traveller. Charles Walter Simpson/Public Domain

They wanted to give an advertisement to the population with this hanging in the cage, says Toupin. It was unusual because this tradition didn t exist anymore in France, but the British still used it, so it was a new thing for us, and for us an important political symbol. It s still in our memory, because what they did was unfair. Corriveau s extreme sentence, both shocking and cruel, cemented her story in the local history and culture.

Eventually Corriveau s body, metal gibbet and all, were taken down and buried in an unmarked grave in a Pointe-L vis churchyard. And for almost 100 years, that s where she stayed, her story slowly taking on mythic dimensions.

Fueled by her sensational, shocking trials and not a small amount of reactionary demonizing of women, the story of La Corriveau evolved, sometimes gaining supernatural flourishes. As the legend grew over the next several decades, her number of dead husbands rose to seven and there were whispers of witchery, or that she was descended from a famous poisoner. Her popular image became a macabre reflection of her final fate, a skeleton in a hanging cage that would appear to terrorize residents. People tried to understand that [event], so they made stories, says Toupin. La Corriveau is still living among us because many people know the story.

Then in 1851, the gibbet in which she was buried, her cage, was unearthed from the churchyard where it was interred. She was not in the cemetery. They decided to enlarge [the cemetery] and they found the cage just by luck, says Toupin. This discovery no doubt injected the folktales with even more life. Versions of La Corriveau began to appear in Canadian literature, and soon she had become something of a cultural institution. But her cage wouldn t remain in Canada for long.

Within months of being dug out of the ground, the gibbet was exhibited in Montr al, L vis, and Qu bec City, before ending up in the hands of P.T. Barnum, who put it on display as a curiosity in his New York museum, in August of 1851. It had a simple plaque that read, From Quebec.

Canada travelsThe cage on display in 2015. Fralambert/CC BY-SA 4.0

From there the cage passed to the Boston Museum in Massachusetts, around 1869. According to dates provided by Toupin, which have only recently been unearthed, the cage then passed to the Essex Institute in Salem, Massachusetts, around 1899, and was put on display at least once around 1931.

According to Dean Lahikainen, the Carolyn and Peter Lynch Curator of American Decorative Art at the Peabody Essex Museum, the modern incarnation of the Essex Institute, it s unclear precisely how long the Institute had the cage on display, but it stayed in their collection for over a century.

In the early 2010s, members of the L vis historical society rediscovered it at the Peabody Essex Museum, after it had been all but forgotten for most of the 20th century. Working with the museum, Corriveau s cage was repatriated to L vis for a special exhibition in 2013. According to Lahikainen, the directors and trustees at the Peabody Essex Museum then donated it to Mus e de la Civilisation in Quebec, where it remains to this day.

The legend of La Corriveau is still a well known folk tale in Quebec, and versions of her story have been turned into a number of books, operas, and more. But thanks to the return of the gibbet in which she met her final fate, the legends and stories are hardening into cold history. In fact Corriveau s gibbet is still being tested and studied to see if they might even be able to pull DNA from it. As Toupin says, Now it s real, it s there, it s scientific.

Correction 11/7/2017: A line has been added to clarify that New France was not under British control until around the time of Corriveau s death, but not when she was born.





07/02/2018

Posted In: NEWS

Tags: ,

Leave a Comment

The 2017 World – s Best Islands, Travel Leisure, travel canada.#Travel

The World’s Top 10 Islands

With destinations both remote and near, it’s easy to choose your castaway experience.

Whether you crave culture, adventure, or simply kicking back on a beach with a cold cocktail, at least one of these islands is sure to be an ideal destination. And should you be willing to spend time in the air in order to land near the sea, all the better: this year, three of the top 10 islands in the world — as decided by Travel + Leisure readers — are in Asia.

No matter that reaching them requires a generous commitment, fiscally and temporally. For the second year in a row, the Philippine paradise Palawan wins first place as the best island in the world, thanks to its hidden lagoons, teeming ocean life, and rustic-luxe resorts. Boracay, Philippines, also makes a return appearance, as does Indonesia’s Bali, an island synonymous with dream honeymoons.

Every year for our World’s Best Awards survey, T+L asks readers to weigh in on travel experiences around the globe — to share their opinions on the top cities, islands, cruise ships, spas, airlines, and more. Readers rated islands according to their activities and sights, natural attractions and beaches, food, friendliness, and overall value.

About the Greek isles, Homer wasn’t wrong. Santorini, with its famous sunsets, has ancient ruins and seemingly endless seascapes that allow us to imagine what inspired The Odyssey. (It bumped Ischia out of the top spot on the 2016 list to again become the No. 1 island in Europe, but who can quibble about either sun-drenched spot?)

Also making the World’s Best Islands Overall list in 2017 are the Hawaiian islands of Maui and Kauai, while those who prefer their snorkeling to be on the wilder side raise their hands for the Galápagos Islands. As one reader wrote of the Ecuadorian national park made famous by Charles Darwin, “If you like to be up close and personal with amazing wildlife, this is a no-brainer.” Adds another, “This place is a miracle.”

Miraculous or just miraculously beautiful, all of these islands have this in common: vast stretches of beauty to explore by day and elegant places to hang your straw hat at night. Whatever your pleasure, you will find it here.





12/01/2018

Posted In: NEWS

Tags: ,

Leave a Comment

Hawaii Travel Information, Official Hawaiian Islands Vacation Guide, Go Hawaii, travel

Aloha

Scroll to Continue

Discover Hawaii

Family Memories

See the Sights in Hawaii

Fun in the Sun

Culinary Delights

Explore Hawaii Regional Cuisine

Farmers Markets

Immerse Yourself in Hawaiian Culture

Traditional and Modern Hula

Museums of The Hawaiian Islands

All Natural: State National Parks

Hawaiian Beaches Galore

Hawaii s Eco-Tourism Experiences

Sightseeing in Hawaii

Hula is Life

Hawaii s Volcanoes: The House of Pele

Intimate Hawaii Moments

Sun-kissed Beaches

Top Wedding Honeymoon Locale

Learn in The Birthplace of Surfing

An Adventurer s Playground

Enjoy the Outdoors

Honolulu – A Shopper s Paradise

One-of-a-Kind Finds in Hawaii

Unique Boutiques, Perfect Finds

Unwind in Hawaii

Fresh Finds at Farmers Markets

Everything is Better on a Beach

Travel canada

Travel canada

Travel canada

Kauai

Kauai is Hawaii’s fourth largest island and is sometimes called the “Garden Isle,” which is an entirely accurate description.

Distance Between Islands

  • Kauai to Oahu: Approx 30 min
  • Kauai to Molokai: Approx 1 hr 5 min
  • Kauai to Lanai: Approx 1 hr 10 min
  • Kauai to Maui: Approx 1 hr 15 min
  • Kauai to Hawaii: Approx 1 hr

Travel canada

The third largest Hawaiian island is home to the majority of Hawaii’s diverse population, a fusion of East and West cultures rooted in the values and traditions of the Native Hawaiian people.

Distance Between Islands

  • Oahu to Kauai: Approx 30 min
  • Oahu to Molokai: Approx 30 min
  • Oahu to Lanai: Approx 35 min
  • Oahu to Maui: Approx 40 min
  • Oahu to Hawaii: Approx 45 min

Travel canada

Molokai

Hawaii’s fifth largest island, Molokai is only 38 miles long and 10 miles across at its widest point and is home to the highest sea cliffs in the world and the longest continuous fringing reef.

Distance Between Islands

  • Molokai to Kauai: Approx 1 hr 5 min
  • Molokai to Oahu: Approx 30 min
  • Molokai to Lanai: Approx 1 hr 5 min
  • Molokai to Maui: Approx 1 hr 10 min
  • Molokai to Hawaii: Approx 1 hr 20 min

Travel canada

Lanai

The smallest inhabited island in Hawaii, Lanai offers big enticements to its visitors. Only nine miles from Maui yet a world away, Lanai can feel like two places.

Distance Between Islands

  • Lanai to Kauai: Approx 1 hr 10 min
  • Lanai to Oahu: Approx 35 min
  • Lanai to Molokai: Approx 1 hr 5 min
  • Lanai to Maui: Approx 1 hr 15 min
  • Lanai to Hawaii: Approx 1 hr 30 min

Travel canada

Maui, known also as “The Valley Isle,” is the second largest Hawaiian island. The island beloved for its world-famous beaches, the sacred Iao Valley, views of migrating humpback whales and much more.

Distance Between Islands

  • Maui to Kauai: Approx 1 hr 15 min
  • Maui to Oahu: Approx 40 min
  • Maui to Molokai: Approx 1 hr 10 min
  • Maui to Lanai: Approx 1 hr 15 min
  • Maui to Hawaii: Approx 40 min

Travel canada

Hawaii

The Island of Hawaii is the youngest and largest island in the Hawaiian chain. Nearly twice as big as all of the other Hawaiian Islands combined (hence, it’s nickname, “The Big Island”), its sheer size is awe-inspiring.

Distance Between Islands

  • Hawaii to Kauai: Approx 1 hr (direct from Kona)
  • Hawaii to Oahu: Approx 45 min (direct from Kona)
  • Hawaii to Molokai: Approx 1 hr 20 min
  • Hawaii to Lanai: Approx 1 hr 30 min
  • Hawaii to Maui: Approx 40 min (direct from Kona)

Travel canada

Travel canada

Travel canada

Compass credit: C. Nainoa Thompson

Islands of Hawaii

Video: Discover the Hawaiian Islands

Travel canada