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CDC Health Information for International Travel

The CDC Health Information for International Travel (The Yellow Book) presents dependable advice on any travel health issue, including vaccinations, essential trip planning and safety tips, prevention of an expanded list of travel-related infectious diseases, altitude illness, motion sickness, sunburn, medical tourism, and much more.

Cdc travel

The expert narrative explains the most common health issues and practical day-to-day information for nine popular destinations and travel itineraries. This official publication of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is filled with valuable information not only for health-care providers and travelers, but also for anyone interested in travel health. It s your trusted travel medicine desktop reference.with a fresh look and feel!

  • Presents the latest expertise and knowledge on diseases and infection control as endorsed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • Features content ranging from basic guidelines to specific treatment options to be useful for both practitioners and general audiences.
  • Includes updated references in each chapter so you can pursue the original medical sources for more detail.
  • Access the latest recommendations for disease risks such as chikungunya fever, yellow fever, and malaria, as well as the most current vaccination guidelines.
  • Covers treatment for patients with specific travel needs, such as immunocompromised travelers, travelers with chronic medical conditions, patients preparing for long-term travel or relocating abroad, flight crew members, humanitarian aid workers, young children, or travelers who are pregnant or breastfeeding.
  • Presents new controversies and emerging diseases with supporting evidence to give you best practice guidelines from the most knowledgeable experts.
  • Includes new editorial boxes on a wide range of topics to provide you with valuable insight.
  • Features a new streamlined, user-friendly bulleted design with color tabs and maps, a chapter organized to mirror a pre-travel consultation, and new appendices-including a travel vaccine summary table-to make finding what you need and putting it in context quick and easy.




12/01/2018

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CDC: Don’t Cancel Hawaii Vacations Because of Dengue Outbreak #lesbian #travel

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CDC: Don’t Cancel Hawaii Vacations Because of Dengue Outbreak

Impacting Travel

There have been 88 confirmed cases since Sept. 11, with only 13 of those being tourists, the state Department of Health said to the AP.

It isn t abnormal for 400 million people worldwide to be infected by this mosquito-borne virus per year, the AP explained. This isn t a huge outbreak compared to elsewhere, Dr. Lyle Petersen, director of the CDC s Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, told the AP.

Dengue fever is not endemic to Hawaii, but can be spread by travelers who come from endemic regions. You can only be infected via the bite of an infected mosquito, not from person-to-person contact, the AP noted.

Many, many more people are traveling internationally, thus the possibility of importing a disease like dengue to a place like Hawaii. is obviously going up, Petersen said to the AP.

Depending on the quality of medical treatment, as the AP put it, dengue fever isn t fatal which is good news, but weathering the virus isn t exactly a boatload of fun. High fever, headache, nausea, muscle aches, bone and joint pain and rash are all in store for the sufferer. There is no vaccination or specific treatment: just bed rest, plus acetaminophen for fever and pain, and symptoms typically clear up completely in 1 to 2 weeks, according to the AP.

No deaths have resulted from this recent outbreak in Hawaii, state Department of Health spokesperson Janice Okubo revealed to the AP.

But just to be sure, as per the official CDC dengue site. protect yourself from mosquito bites and go on your vacation as planned. If you consider how many tens of thousands of people come to the islands every day the risk is extremely small, he said to the AP. Simple measures like mosquito repellent. can greatly reduce your risk.

The Hawaii Tourism Authority is keeping an eye on the outbreak s progress and intends to keep tourists informed. To date, we have not seen an increase in cancellations due to dengue fever, Hawaii Tourism Authority President and CEO George Szigeti said in a statement, per the AP. And at this point, it is too early to determine if there has been any economic impact on our industry.

Mosquito control measures are key, and authorities are trying spread the word to all corners of the Big Island, especially in rural areas.

I know our message isn t getting out to everyone out there, said State Epidemiologist Dr. Sarah Park to lawmakers at an informational briefing, according to the AP. She requested that residents look out for their neighbors and help them eradicate mosquito breeding grounds, such as standing water.

The CDC is supporting Hawaii health officials and the Hawaii National Guard flew in sprayer equipment from Honolulu all in the effort to stop the dengue fever outbreak cold.

Get top CDC tips on preventing mosquito bites when traveling in this handy graphic: https://t.co/RyjI1Ni8J7





24/12/2017

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Cdc travel #where #to #get #cheapest #airline #tickets

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Traveling Out of the Country?

Going abroad? Learn about the vaccines you need to travel safely and see a travel health specialist four to six weeks before your trip. This gives the vaccines enough time to take effect, and allows for subsequent doses, if necessary, in the time that follows.

Remember to pack good health for your trip! Vaccines are your passport to adventure around the world. Some vaccines may even be required for you to travel to certain places. Protect yourself and your community by getting vaccinated before you travel.

Know before you go: which vaccines do you need for your trip?

Go to the CDC Travel Health site to learn about vaccines and other important information to stay healthy while you travel.

MMR Vaccine and Travel

The measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine is very important for travelers. Each year, unvaccinated people get measles while in other countries and bring it to the United States. This has sometimes led to outbreaks. Since 2000, when measles was declared eliminated from the U.S. the annual number of people reported to have measles ranged from a low of 37 people in 2004 to a high of 668 people in 2014. The majority of measles cases brought into the U.S. come from U.S. residents. When we can identify vaccine status, almost all are unvaccinated.

  • For those who travel internationally, CDC recommends that all U.S. residents older than 6 months be protected from measles and receive MMR vaccine, if needed, prior to departure.
  • Infants 6 through 11 months old should receive 1 dose of MMR vaccine before departure.
  • Children 12 months of age or older should have documentation of 2 doses of MMR vaccine (separated by at least 28 days).
  • Teenagers and adults without evidence of measles immunity should have documentation of 2 appropriately spaced doses of MMR vaccine.

To find out more about the MMR vaccine travel recommendation, visit: http://www.cdc.gov/measles/travelers.html

Other Travel Vaccines

However, it may not just be MMR vaccine that you need. You may be exposed to different diseases based on the countries you are visiting. For example, you may need the yellow fever vaccine if traveling to certain countries in Africa or Central or South America. If traveling to Asia, Latin America, or Africa, you may need typhoid vaccine.

What you need to know about vaccinations and travel: A checklist

  • Have you scheduled a visit to your doctor or a travel medicine provider?
  • Are you aware which vaccinations you or those traveling with you may need?
  • Do you have altered immunocompetence due to illnesses such as diabetes or HIV?
  • Are you pregnant or breastfeeding?
  • Are you traveling with infants or children?
  • If you haven t looked up health information for your destination, do so at the CDC Travel Health site .




24/12/2017

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Doing Business Abroad? CDC Helps You Travel Safe and Smart #airfare

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Doing Business Abroad? CDC Helps You Travel Safe and Smart

DOING BUSINESS ABROAD? CDC HELPS YOU TRAVEL SAFE AND SMART

For many businesses, international travel plays a critical role in the success of the organization. But with millions of Americans traveling internationally for work, the direct and indirect costs of business travel-related illnesses and injuries can be significant. Beyond health care expenses, there may be costs for evacuation, trip cancellation and rebooking fees, as well as lost productivity.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers comprehensive travelers’ health information and advice that help protect U.S. citizens and businesses from diseases and other health risks abroad. In addition to delivering a wide variety of travel resources—including destination-specific information and mobile apps—CDC also works with global partners to prevent avoidable catastrophes, detect and communicate threats early and mobilize effective responses to contain outbreaks, especially those that can spread rapidly through travel.

For example, diseases like MERS and measles can travel as fast as a plane can fly. Malaria is easily spread through mosquito bites in affected areas. Food and water contaminants can lead to prolonged illness. And road-related crashes are the number-one killer of healthy international travelers.

In today’s interconnected economy, travel is an essential part of doing business. In this issue of Business Pulse, you’ll learn from CDC about how to prepare for various health risks and benefit from productive, healthy business activities abroad.





05/09/2017

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CDC: Don’t Cancel Hawaii Vacations Because of Dengue Outbreak #find #cheapest

#cdc travel
#

CDC: Don’t Cancel Hawaii Vacations Because of Dengue Outbreak

Impacting Travel

There have been 88 confirmed cases since Sept. 11, with only 13 of those being tourists, the state Department of Health said to the AP.

It isn t abnormal for 400 million people worldwide to be infected by this mosquito-borne virus per year, the AP explained. This isn t a huge outbreak compared to elsewhere, Dr. Lyle Petersen, director of the CDC s Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, told the AP.

Dengue fever is not endemic to Hawaii, but can be spread by travelers who come from endemic regions. You can only be infected via the bite of an infected mosquito, not from person-to-person contact, the AP noted.

Many, many more people are traveling internationally, thus the possibility of importing a disease like dengue to a place like Hawaii. is obviously going up, Petersen said to the AP.

Depending on the quality of medical treatment, as the AP put it, dengue fever isn t fatal which is good news, but weathering the virus isn t exactly a boatload of fun. High fever, headache, nausea, muscle aches, bone and joint pain and rash are all in store for the sufferer. There is no vaccination or specific treatment: just bed rest, plus acetaminophen for fever and pain, and symptoms typically clear up completely in 1 to 2 weeks, according to the AP.

No deaths have resulted from this recent outbreak in Hawaii, state Department of Health spokesperson Janice Okubo revealed to the AP.

But just to be sure, as per the official CDC dengue site. protect yourself from mosquito bites and go on your vacation as planned. If you consider how many tens of thousands of people come to the islands every day the risk is extremely small, he said to the AP. Simple measures like mosquito repellent. can greatly reduce your risk.

The Hawaii Tourism Authority is keeping an eye on the outbreak s progress and intends to keep tourists informed. To date, we have not seen an increase in cancellations due to dengue fever, Hawaii Tourism Authority President and CEO George Szigeti said in a statement, per the AP. And at this point, it is too early to determine if there has been any economic impact on our industry.

Mosquito control measures are key, and authorities are trying spread the word to all corners of the Big Island, especially in rural areas.

I know our message isn t getting out to everyone out there, said State Epidemiologist Dr. Sarah Park to lawmakers at an informational briefing, according to the AP. She requested that residents look out for their neighbors and help them eradicate mosquito breeding grounds, such as standing water.

The CDC is supporting Hawaii health officials and the Hawaii National Guard flew in sprayer equipment from Honolulu all in the effort to stop the dengue fever outbreak cold.

Get top CDC tips on preventing mosquito bites when traveling in this handy graphic: https://t.co/RyjI1Ni8J7





27/07/2017

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CDC Health Information for International Travel 2014: The Yellow Book #online

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Amazon.com Review

Product Description

Health risks are real and ever-changing, especially while traveling abroad. To stay abreast of the most up-to-date health recommendations, experienced travelers and health care professionals have always relied on CDC’s user-friendly Health Information for International Travel (commonly known as the The Yellow Book ) as their one indispensable guide. Updated biennially by a team of almost two hundred experts-including both CDC staff and travel medicine experts–this book is the only publication that contains all of the official government recommendations for international travel.

Clearly written and featuring full-color illustrations, the book provides easy-to-read disease risk maps, information on where to find health care during travel, advice for those traveling with infants and children, a comprehensive catalog of diseases, and detailed country-specific health warnings. For example, the section on the Caribbean lays out the recommended immunizations and examines specific health risks for travelers to the region, ranging from malaria to dengue, yellow fever, and traveler’s diarrhea. But the book goes beyond the risk of disease to discuss dangers such as violent crime-fortunately, not a great danger to tourists in the area-and also to remind travelers that the single greatest cause of injury death among visitors are traffic accidents. The section on the Caribbean also notes hurricane season and outlines the risks involved in snorkeling, diving, and other water activities common to the area.

Review

a beloved travel must-have for the intrepid wanderer –Publishers Weekly Picks for the best health books of 2009 [include] the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s guide. Sections address the risks of going overseas for medical care, health concerns when traveling with infants and children, and medical issues to consider with international adoptions. –Wall Street Journal Every healthcare provider in the U.S. involved in travel medicine must have the latest edition of this book or prompt access to the online version, which has up-to-date recommendations and corrections on typographical errors in the print version. — Carlos E. Figueroa Castro, MD (Boone Hospital Center), Doody’s This is an excellent review text for physicians and other health care professionals who see patients for pre-travel consultation. –Mayo Clinic Proceedings Travel medicine practitioners in the U.S. are expected to have this book on their bookshelf (or have it bookmarked in their Internet browser if using the online version). As with previous editions, the book is conceived as a guide, not as a comprehensive textbook of travel medicine. With the emergence of new infections and travel regulations, this is an invaluable rapid reference for busy clinicians. 5 Stars! DOODY’S There’s a wealth of travel medical textbooks with overlapping content, but it’s good to have one with the authority in the back when we give our recommendations. The Yellow Book from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is one such. [. ] The Yellow Book is recommended for anyone involved in travel medicine and vaccination. — G Hasle, The Journal of the Norwegian Medical Association

About the Author

Gary W. Brunette, MD, MS, is Chief of the Travelers’ Health Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.





27/07/2017

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