Ditch the Hotel: 10 Cheaper Ways to Stay #search #for #airline

#hotel for cheap
#

Ditch the Hotel: 10 Cheaper Ways to Stay

Travelers can find cozy, convenient lodging for $50, $20 or even free in virtually every destination — as long as they know where to look.

Aside from airfare, lodging is typically the expense that takes the biggest bite out of a vacation budget. But there’s no need to rack up hotel stays for $100 – $200 a night or more. Creative travelers who are willing to consider alternatives to hotels could pay a fraction of that price — or nothing at all.

Below, we review 10 options and evaluate the pros and cons of each. Read on to see if these affordable alternatives to hotels are something you’ll dig or want to dump.

Short-Term Room Rentals

This is a popular and ever-growing trend in the travel world — a cross between vacation rentals and homestays. Using websites like Airbnb.com and 9flats.com, travelers can rent a room in someone’s house, a cottage or a private studio apartment for low nightly rates (it’s not uncommon to see prices under $50 per night). It’s a way for hosts to open up their homes and make a little extra money, while giving travelers a great deal and a local’s-eye view of a destination.

Do you love a chance to meet people, see how they live, maybe play a midnight game of Scrabble or Call of Duty? Although you may score a cottage all by yourself, it’s more likely you’ll get a small bedroom and share a bath. If that’s cool with you, a short-term room rental is your thing.

If uncertainly keeps you awake at night, you may sleep better at a chain hotel.

Toilet Paper Tussle at the Airbnb: How I Survived a Homestay





27/12/2017

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How to Travel the World on $50 a Day: Revised: Travel

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Description

Review

Praise for How to Travel the World on $50 a Day

A bible for budget travellers. — BBC Travel

“Whether you’re a savvy backpacker or just dreaming of getting a passport and going overseas, Matt’s collection of easy-to-employ money-saving strategies will open your eyes to the near-infinite ways of seeing the world without busting your budget.” —Matt Gross, former New York Times Frugal Traveler

“If you’ve longed to travel the world but figured it was just an unattainable pipe-dream, take that pipe out of your mouth and read this book. Matt Kepnes does the math and shows you how to make this dream a reality, from how to save for an extended trip, which credit card to get, how to handle banking on the road, to a breakdown of how to save on accommodations, transportation, food, and activities. Matt proves that for most Americans, traveling is cheaper than staying home.” —Marilyn Terrell, National Geographic Traveler

“A celeb in the travel blogging world, Matt is your go-to guy for all things budget backpacker. This book is an awesome resource for any traveler looking to maximize their adventures without maxing out their credit cards.” —Julia Dimon, Travel Writer, Outside TV

“There are very few people in the world who have gathered as much first-hand knowledge about long-term world travel as Nomadic Matt. This book will guide you from the first exclamation of ‘I’m going traveling!’ through the planning, take-off, and navigation. Filled with insider strategies and resources, it’s a valuable primer for your upcoming adventures.” —Tim Leffel, author of The World’s Cheapest Destinations

Product Description

For close to a decade, Matt Kepnes (aka Nomadic Matt) has used his massively popular travel blog to teach readers how to travel the world on a budget.

Traditional media shows you expensive hotels, resorts, cruises, and packages because that’s what makes them money. They make you believe you have to spend lots of money to have a great experience traveling.

This book will show you why that is a lie and how to use the system against itself to gain free flights, hotel rooms, find alternative accommodation, get into attractions for free, websites to find the best deals, and as well as detailed costs and saving tips for destinations around the world.

If you’ve ever dreamed of traveling the world – or maybe just taking your family to Disney or a trip to London, How to Travel the World on $50 a Day will give you the practical, step-by-step instructions to get your there. Matt reveals the tips, tricks, and secrets to comfortable budget travel that you won’t find anywhere else with over 100 new pages of updated content in this revised and expanded edition. He interviews dozens of other travelers about their success on the road and how you can apply that to your own trip.

Whether it’s a two-week, two-month, or two-year trip, Matt shows you how to stretch your money further so you can travel cheaper, smarter, and longer.

If you want to stop dreaming of travel and start doing it, this book is for you. There’s never going to be a perfect time to travel and Matt will show you how to make the most of your time and money so you stop saying one day and start taking action today!





18/12/2017

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Airline Tickets from – Cheaper Cheap Flights and Very Cheap Travel

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Welcome to OwlAirfare.com. Save up to 80% on ANY airline ticket worldwide using airfare search service on our web site.

Our built-in engine search for airline tickets on multiple and all major travel sites at once! For latest air fare prices and discounts just enter departure and destination city or airport code, select desired date and search with GET BEST PROVIDERS. Search for airline ticket and booking of airfare never was easier.

Search engine cover all major airline companies. Simply: enter details once, search all offers at once. Do not miss Latest Airline Discount Offers .

See example on low airfare search – how to pay $363 instead $1362 on single airfare deal on high respectable travel site by one of best airliners!





22/11/2017

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13 Secrets for Finding Cheaper Airfare – US News #tickets #travel

#cheap airline travel
#

13 Secrets for Finding Cheaper Airfare

The cheapest flights are 3 p.m. on Tuesdays. Can’t make that? Try these insider booking tips.

With the holiday travel season just around the corner, you’re probably wondering how you can get in on a good deal. After all, airfare is undoubtedly one of the most expensive components of any domestic or international travel plan, and prices can vary wildly at times – from manageable to downright cost-prohibitive. The good news is, there are still a few secrets left when it comes to finding airfare you can afford. And, even better, the hassle of searching might be less labor intensive than you ever realized.

If you’re searching for airfare you can truly afford, try these simple tips before pulling the trigger:

Book 49 days in advance. CheapAir.com combed through data on over 11,000 domestic flights to discover the optimum number of days in advance you should book airfare. According to the numbers, the sweet spot for most airfare is around 49 days, or seven weeks, in advance.

Book further out around the holidays. The same CheapAir.com study from last year showed that the optimum booking time was slightly earlier for peak travel times. For example, the cheapest flights around Thanksgiving were booked 96 days, or 14 weeks, in advance.

Fly on Tuesday, Wednesday or Saturday. According to FareCompare.com, the cheapest days to fly in the U.S. are the days less popular with consumers. And apparently, those days are Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday.

Avoid popular flying days. The concept of supply and demand applies to many things, including airfare. That’s why flying on popular flying days, such as Friday or Sunday, will set you back more. If you want to save, avoid these days and opt for the less popular travel days instead.

Consider flying very early … or very late. Most people don’t want to fly at the crack of dawn or past their bedtime. Because of this, early and late flights are typically far cheaper than flights during normal business hours.

Book your flight on a Tuesday. FareCompare.com reports that the cheapest flights are typically at 3 p.m. on Tuesdays. Even if you don’t book your flight then, it never hurts to look.

Book two one-way flights. Round-trip flights are typically cheaper to book, but that isn’t always the case. Before you sign up for a round-trip flight, price out options for two one-way bookings and consider two different airlines. It might be cheaper that way, and you’ll never know unless you compare.

Accept a layover. Nonstop flights are typically the most convenient – and therefore the most expensive. Instead of choosing the easy option, look for flights with at least one layover. Chances are, this little inconvenience will add up to big savings.

Take advantage of the Internet. The Internet is a treasure trove of information if you’re looking for ways to save on airfare. For starters, use a fare comparing search engine like Kayak.com, or even Google’s Flight Search. Shop around online until you find the best deal.

Follow airlines on social media. Before committing yourself to a certain flight at a specific price, follow your favorite airlines on social media and sign up for their mailing lists. Doing so could mean hearing about insider deals and saving even more.

Sign up for a co-branded rewards credit card. Many airlines offer a co-branded credit card that can help you earn airline miles, free checked baggage and more. They may also offer a hefty sign-up bonus just for signing up and spending a certain amount of money within a specific time frame.

Join frequent flier programs. In addition to getting an airline rewards credit card, you can sign up for that airline’s frequent flier program. This can help you earn free miles for airfare you’re purchasing anyway.

Travel to a different airport. Airfare at airports within 100 miles of each other can vary drastically, making it increasingly important to consider airfare to and from different cities and towns. The cost of driving to an airport an hour away could end up being far less than the difference in your airline ticket.

Trying one of these tips could lead to hundreds of dollars in savings. but applying all of them could mean saving even more. So start searching online for deals, and consider traveling during off-peak times and from airports within 100 miles of your home. And don’t forget to sign up for offers from your favorite airlines; you never know when the perfect deal could come along.

And no matter what, don’t give up. The ideal airfare is out there somewhere – all you have to do is find it.





16/11/2017

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United Airlines suing 22-year-old NYC man who figured out how to

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#

United Airlines suing 22-year-old NYC man who figured out how to get cheaper plane tickets

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) A young computer whiz from New York City has launched a site to help people buy cheap plane tickets. But an airline company and its travel partner want to shut him down.

United Airlines and Orbitz filed a civil lawsuit last month against 22-year-old Aktarer Zaman, who founded the website Skiplagged.com last year.

The site helps travelers find cheap flights by using a strategy called “hidden city” ticketing.

The idea is that you buy an airline ticket that has a layover at your actual destination. Say you want to fly from New York to San Francisco – you actually book a flight from New York to Lake Tahoe with a layover in San Francisco and get off there, without bothering to take the last leg of the flight.

This travel strategy only works if you book a one-way flight with no checked bags (they would have landed in Lake Tahoe).

Skiplagged.com now has a banner on the top of the site with a donation fund to support the creator’s legal defense.

It’s not like these tickets are the cheapest all the time, but they often are.

In the lawsuit, United and Orbitz call Skiplagged “unfair competition” and allege that it is promoting “strictly prohibited” travel. They want to recoup $75,000 in lost revenue from Zaman.

Zaman said he knew a lawsuit was inevitable but he points out that there’s nothing illegal about his web site.

He also said he has made no profit via the website and that all he’s done is help travelers get the best prices by exposing an “inefficiency,” in airline prices that insiders have known about for decades.

“[Hidden city ticketing] have been around for a while, it just hasn’t been very accessible to consumers,” Zaman told CNNMoney.

Indeed, “hidden city,” ticketing is no secret among frequent fliers, said Michael Boyd, President of Boyd Group International, an aviation consulting firm in Evergreen, Co. Boyd worked as an American Airline ticket agent 30 years ago, and says he was trained at the airline to help customers find “hidden city” fares.

“I don’t think it’s illegal what he’s doing,” Boyd said. But lawsuits are expensive and it could end up costing the young entrepreneur who has irked the two billion dollar corporations.

Airlines usually offer cheaper fares for some destinations that are not regional hubs, Boyd said. Many of these flights are routed through more popular destinations. But if a lot of people take advantage of that discrepancy it could hurt the airlines, which is why they want to shut him down.

Born in Bangladesh, Zaman grew up in Brooklyn, N.Y. and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in computer science at age 20 from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He lives in Manhattan and works at a technology start-up that he declined to name.

Zaman said Skiplagged is just a “side project.”

Zaman and United declined to discuss the lawsuit. Orbitz said in a statement that it is obligated to uphold airline fare rules.

Other travel experts say that the airlines may not achieve much if Zaman’s site is shut down, especially in a world where information is becoming more readily available.

“If [Skiplagged is] shut down, undoubtedly there will be other people to come along to scrape fares and make them available,” said Robert Mann, president of R.W. Mann Company, an airline consulting firm in Port Washington, N.Y.

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10/11/2017

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Yapta Alerts You to a Cheaper Airfare in Time to Rebook

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#

Even After Cancellation Fees, Travelers Say They Save by Buying a New Ticket at a Lower Price

Updated Aug. 29, 2014 1:04 p.m. ET

Searching for a Labor Day weekend plane ticket home for my daughter, I saw an attractive $432 fare on American Airlines. I sent her the details and she responded within 90 minutes.

Airfares bounce up and down, often frustrating and angering travelers. But can you get a better price after you buy? WSJ s Middle Seat columnist Scott McCartney joins Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero with the answer. Photo: Getty

Yapta, which began tracking airfares in 2007, has turned its fare-searching technology into a corporate tool to hunt for lower fares and hotel room rates after trips are booked. It’s available to consumers at yapta.com.

Whenever a price drops in the first 24 hours after purchase, or when it drops more than the cost of the airline’s change fee, Yapta sends you an alert and you rebook at the lower price, paying the change fee and pocketing what’s left.

Airlines, having created so much volatility in their own pricing, are offering ways to beat the bounces, too. Last week, British Airways announced it would offer a 72-hour price hold for a flat fee of $10—useful if you see a good price but aren’t ready to commit to a nonrefundable ticket. That’s similar to United Airlines’s FareLock, where you pay $5 to $20 and lock in a price for either 72 hours or seven days.

(Read more from The Wall Street Journal: Five Things To Know Today .)

You could combine the two in a strategy to make sure you are getting the best price possible. Put a fare on hold and put Yapta to work. If the price drops during the hold period, you’ll get an alert and you can jump on it.

Yapta does what consumers or travel managers could do manually: It periodically rechecks the price of a ticket. Airlines don’t embrace the idea, and their pricy penalties for changing nonrefundable tickets limits how often travelers rebook. But neither have airlines put up a fight against Yapta. After all, they are the ones bouncing prices up and down.

When you search for an airline ticket, you usually see one price for a particular trip on specific dates. Airlines, though, actually load as many as two dozen different prices into reservation systems. A number of seats are offered at the lowest price in each class of service, and when those seats sell, reservation computers automatically display the next higher price as the best available.

Several times a day, airline pricing analysts and their computers can change the number of seats available at each price point, and they can change the prices themselves.

Mix in actual purchases and you get a rapidly changing pricing vortex that can anger and frustrate shoppers. One minute you see a good price; the next minute it’s a whole lot higher.

A lot happens between the time you buy and the time you fly,” says James Filsinger, Yapta’s chief executive of the Seattle-based company.

Yapta says its research shows some cities are a lot more volatile for airline prices than others. Tickets leaving from San Francisco were the most volatile of 15 major airports for business travel, Yapta found, and departures from New York’s LaGuardia Airport were the least volatile. San Francisco is a hub for both United Airlines and Virgin America, providing lots of pricing competition. La Guardia, with limited takeoff and landing slots, historically has lacked low-fare competition.

Started by a former airline pricing executive, Yapta now is run by Mr. Filsinger, a former executive at the reservation technology firm Sabre Group. Yapta takes fare data published by airlines and periodically tracks the lowest price available for a trip it is monitoring. So far working only on tickets sold in the U.S. Yapta says there are savings opportunities on 11.2% of all itineraries, after airline change fees.

Most of the chances to get money back come within the void window” of the first 24 hours after purchase. Corporate travel departments typically get a full business day.

When there were savings to be had, the average in a Yapta study of 150,000 itineraries booked from July through December 2013 was $306 after fees on tickets above $500, and $58 after fees on tickets under $500.

The Transportation Department requires at least a 24-hour cancellation window for tickets sold in the U.S. as long as the reservation is more than seven days before departure.

Most airlines charge the full price up front at the time of booking, but must give a full refund if canceled within 24 hours. (They don’t advertise that fact much.) American offers a 24-hour hold on reservations, without payment, instead of a refund in the 24-hour window.

ENLARGE

With corporate customers, Yapta loads its software into travel department booking systems. It doesn’t charge for the service but takes a cut of the savings, usually about 35%, Mr. Filsinger said. With consumers, use of the tracking tool is free. Companies, like consumers, can set a threshold on minimum savings before an alert is sent, to take into account change fees and other expenses. The company recently launched a similar system to check for falling hotel room prices, but so far that’s offered only to corporate travel departments and not consumers.

The bigger the fare, the bigger the potential savings, so travel managers say they have seen their most eye-popping results on international business-class tickets.

One Friday, Al Mazzola, director of travel services at Sykes Enterprises Inc. a Florida technology-consulting company, booked a $19,000 business-class ticket from Tampa to Shanghai and back, only to see it fall to $7,000 over the weekend. With the Yapta alert, the company grabbed the new price. I was stunned. I’ve never seen savings like that,” Mr. Mazzola said.

Mr. Mazzola has been using Yapta for more than a year and said he has saved more than $125,000, even after Yapta’s percentage and airline change fees. He said probably 90% of the savings comes in the void period, the first full business day after purchase.

Most of the price changes happen in the middle of the night, Mr. Mazzola says, and the new fares are usually still there when he gets to work around 7 a.m. on the East Coast.

Travel agents can rebook via computer when an alert comes in. The traveler keeps the same seat and the same reservation code. Mr. Mazzola sends an email to company travelers saying, Congratulations, we found a lower fare for you.”

Still, savings are too sporadic to justify booking a high-price ticket in the expectation that it will come down. The company tries always to book the lowest fare, he said.

Similar to United’s FareLock, which Continental Airlines first offered in 2010 shortly before its merger with United, is British Airways’s 72-hour hold option. It can help you hang on to a price if it turns out to be the lowest offered. British Airways said it refunds the deposit—$10 for flights from the U.S. €10 from Europe and £10 from the United Kingdom—if the ticket purchase is made. Seats can only be held 21 days or longer before departure.

The hold fee is offered through ba.com and includes code-sharing flights on partner airlines. A few destinations, including some in the Caribbean as well as Buenos Aires, Cairo, Lagos and some cities in India, aren’t available because of complex fluctuating tax calculations, British Airways said.

United said FareLock fees are nonrefundable even if you buy the ticket and can be used only with United and United Express flights, not Star Alliance partners. FareLock can be used to hold frequent-flier award tickets.

Corrections Amplifications

An earlier version should have stated that American Airlines complies with Transportation Department rules by offering a 24-hour hold period on reservations for nonrefundable tickets, instead of a 24-hour refund window. (Aug. 29, 2014)





09/09/2017

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A Clever Secret to Getting a Cheaper Airfare #cheap #tickets #flights

#airfare and hotel packages
#

A Clever Secret to Getting a Cheaper Airfare

There’s a secret in the travel world that, once discovered, can make you feel like a great explorer.

Suddenly, you’re Marco Polo stumbling onto an overland trade route to China or Magellan finding his way around Cape Horn. This secret is truly sensational — something that could even change the way you look at the world. of great deals on airfare.

It happens as simply as booking a deal for a roundtrip transatlantic flight for more than $800 less than the normal ticket price by adding on a rental car. That’s right: book more, pay much less.

Normally, if you’re booking a trip for a week or so, you only get a cheap fare if you stay over at least one Saturday. Book a Monday through Friday flight, as many business travelers do, and the airlines gouge you. However, if you fly British Airways and book a package deal through its website (flight + rental car, hotel, etc.), you are granted access to the super-secret cheapo rates.

Evidence our sample booking. We were looking for a flight from Chicago to London. and the lowest fare we found for our Monday – Friday itinerary was $1,855 on the British Airways website. But when we clicked on the “flight + car” package option, the total price dropped to $1,044.

Tips for Finding Cheap Airfare

We wanted answers. We called one of BA’s agents, who confirmed that, indeed, you can get this kind of deal routinely by booking a package. “When we’re selling holidays, we’re a tour operator and we have preferential rates, which we’re able to pass. on to the consumer,” said Tracy Long of British Airways Holidays. “If you’re booking anything more than just a flight, you’re able to take advantage of deeper discounts.”

In this case, booking a package may also have dropped us into the leisure travel category, which usually offers cheaper rates than those for business travelers. The savings aren’t always astounding, yet considering that you are getting more — in some cases much more — you win if you bundle your travel elements together as opposed to booking each independently.

Consider a roundtrip flight on Virgin Atlantic from New York to London that we sampled at $1,855. When we used the Virgin Vacations search to include four nights’ hotel and a four-day car rental, we got the entire package from $1,864 per person — just $9 more for a hotel and rental car as well as a flight.

Using an aggregate site such as Expedia.com can save you money as well. A flight on Air Berlin from Miami to Helsinki would set us back $1,268. On Expedia.com, we’d pay $1,249 — $19 less — for a flight plus four nights in a three-star hotel.

How to Create the Perfect Itinerary

Not all airline websites make it as easy to bundle a hotel or car rental as others. Finnair, for example, doesn’t offer a bundling option, while Aer Lingus and Icelandair offer only their own prepackaged vacations, which may or may not suit your needs. American Airlines’ site has a “Round-Trip + Hotel” button, while Delta provides both package deals and build-your-own options.

Be warned that bundling is not always cheaper, so you’ll want to check the individual pricing as well. If you don’t actually need a car or hotel, you should not try to book a bundle anyway, lest your entire booking be voided by your failure to pick up your rental or show up at your hotel. Finally, keep in mind that packages nearly always include larger hotels, which might not be your cup of tea if you’re inclined to stay in B updated by Sarah Schlichter





07/09/2017

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United Airlines sues 22-year-old who found method for buying cheaper plane

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United Airlines sues 22-year-old who found method for buying cheaper plane tickets

[FILE] United Airlines jets are parked at the terminal at O Hare International Airport in Chicago, Illinois on Oct. 25, 2013. Credit: Ricky Shine/CNN

By Patrick Gillespie for CNN

NEW YORK A young computer whiz from New York City has launched a site to help people buy cheap plane tickets. But an airline company and its travel partner want to shut him down.

United Airlines and Orbitz filed a civil lawsuit last month against 22-year-old Aktarer Zaman, who founded the website Skiplagged.com last year.

The site helps travelers find cheap flights by using a strategy called hidden city ticketing.

The idea is that you buy an airline ticket that has a layover at your actual destination. Say you want to fly from New York to San Francisco you actually book a flight from New York to Lake Tahoe with a layover in San Francisco and get off there, without bothering to take the last leg of the flight.

This travel strategy only works if you book a one-way flight with no checked bags (they would have landed in Lake Tahoe).

It s not like these tickets are the cheapest all the time, but they often are.

In the lawsuit, United and Orbitz call Skiplagged unfair competition and allege that it is promoting strictly prohibited travel. They want to recoup $75,000 in lost revenue from Zaman.

Zaman said he knew a lawsuit was inevitable but he points out that there s nothing illegal about his web site.

He also said he has made no profit via the website and that all he s done is help travelers get the best prices by exposing an inefficiency, in airline prices that insiders have known about for decades.

[Hidden city ticketing] have been around for a while, it just hasn t been very accessible to consumers, Zaman told CNNMoney.

Indeed, hidden city, ticketing is no secret among frequent fliers, said Michael Boyd, President of Boyd Group International, an aviation consulting firm in Evergreen, Co. Boyd worked as an American Airline ticket agent 30 years ago, and says he was trained at the airline to help customers find hidden city fares.

I don t think it s illegal what he s doing, Boyd said. But lawsuits are expensive and it could end up costing the young entrepreneur who has irked the two billion dollar corporations.

Airlines usually offer cheaper fares for some destinations that are not regional hubs, Boyd said. Many of these flights are routed through more popular destinations. But if a lot of people take advantage of that discrepancy it could hurt the airlines, which is why they want to shut him down.

Born in Bangladesh, Zaman grew up in Brooklyn, N.Y. and graduated with a bachelor s degree in computer science at age 20 from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He lives in Manhattan and works at a technology start-up that he declined to name.

Zaman said Skiplagged is just a side project.

Zaman and United declined to discuss the lawsuit. Orbitz said in a statement that it is obligated to uphold airline fare rules.

Other travel experts say that the airlines may not achieve much if Zaman s site is shut down, especially in a world where information is becoming more readily available.

If [Skiplagged is] shut down, undoubtedly there will be other people to come along to scrape fares and make them available, Robert Mann said, president of R.W. Mann Company, an airline consulting firm in Port Washington, New York.

Trademark and Copyright 2015 Cable News Network. Inc. a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.





17/08/2017

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13 Secrets for Finding Cheaper Airfare – US News #best #price

#cheap airline travel
#

13 Secrets for Finding Cheaper Airfare

The cheapest flights are 3 p.m. on Tuesdays. Can’t make that? Try these insider booking tips.

With the holiday travel season just around the corner, you’re probably wondering how you can get in on a good deal. After all, airfare is undoubtedly one of the most expensive components of any domestic or international travel plan, and prices can vary wildly at times – from manageable to downright cost-prohibitive. The good news is, there are still a few secrets left when it comes to finding airfare you can afford. And, even better, the hassle of searching might be less labor intensive than you ever realized.

If you’re searching for airfare you can truly afford, try these simple tips before pulling the trigger:

Book 49 days in advance. CheapAir.com combed through data on over 11,000 domestic flights to discover the optimum number of days in advance you should book airfare. According to the numbers, the sweet spot for most airfare is around 49 days, or seven weeks, in advance.

Book further out around the holidays. The same CheapAir.com study from last year showed that the optimum booking time was slightly earlier for peak travel times. For example, the cheapest flights around Thanksgiving were booked 96 days, or 14 weeks, in advance.

Fly on Tuesday, Wednesday or Saturday. According to FareCompare.com, the cheapest days to fly in the U.S. are the days less popular with consumers. And apparently, those days are Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday.

Avoid popular flying days. The concept of supply and demand applies to many things, including airfare. That’s why flying on popular flying days, such as Friday or Sunday, will set you back more. If you want to save, avoid these days and opt for the less popular travel days instead.

Consider flying very early … or very late. Most people don’t want to fly at the crack of dawn or past their bedtime. Because of this, early and late flights are typically far cheaper than flights during normal business hours.

Book your flight on a Tuesday. FareCompare.com reports that the cheapest flights are typically at 3 p.m. on Tuesdays. Even if you don’t book your flight then, it never hurts to look.

Book two one-way flights. Round-trip flights are typically cheaper to book, but that isn’t always the case. Before you sign up for a round-trip flight, price out options for two one-way bookings and consider two different airlines. It might be cheaper that way, and you’ll never know unless you compare.

Accept a layover. Nonstop flights are typically the most convenient – and therefore the most expensive. Instead of choosing the easy option, look for flights with at least one layover. Chances are, this little inconvenience will add up to big savings.

Take advantage of the Internet. The Internet is a treasure trove of information if you’re looking for ways to save on airfare. For starters, use a fare comparing search engine like Kayak.com, or even Google’s Flight Search. Shop around online until you find the best deal.

Follow airlines on social media. Before committing yourself to a certain flight at a specific price, follow your favorite airlines on social media and sign up for their mailing lists. Doing so could mean hearing about insider deals and saving even more.

Sign up for a co-branded rewards credit card. Many airlines offer a co-branded credit card that can help you earn airline miles, free checked baggage and more. They may also offer a hefty sign-up bonus just for signing up and spending a certain amount of money within a specific time frame.

Join frequent flier programs. In addition to getting an airline rewards credit card, you can sign up for that airline’s frequent flier program. This can help you earn free miles for airfare you’re purchasing anyway.

Travel to a different airport. Airfare at airports within 100 miles of each other can vary drastically, making it increasingly important to consider airfare to and from different cities and towns. The cost of driving to an airport an hour away could end up being far less than the difference in your airline ticket.

Trying one of these tips could lead to hundreds of dollars in savings. but applying all of them could mean saving even more. So start searching online for deals, and consider traveling during off-peak times and from airports within 100 miles of your home. And don’t forget to sign up for offers from your favorite airlines; you never know when the perfect deal could come along.

And no matter what, don’t give up. The ideal airfare is out there somewhere – all you have to do is find it.





12/08/2017

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Yapta Alerts You to a Cheaper Airfare in Time to Rebook

#find cheap airfare
#

Even After Cancellation Fees, Travelers Say They Save by Buying a New Ticket at a Lower Price

Updated Aug. 29, 2014 1:04 p.m. ET

Searching for a Labor Day weekend plane ticket home for my daughter, I saw an attractive $432 fare on American Airlines. I sent her the details and she responded within 90 minutes.

Airfares bounce up and down, often frustrating and angering travelers. But can you get a better price after you buy? WSJ s Middle Seat columnist Scott McCartney joins Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero with the answer. Photo: Getty

Yapta, which began tracking airfares in 2007, has turned its fare-searching technology into a corporate tool to hunt for lower fares and hotel room rates after trips are booked. It’s available to consumers at yapta.com.

Whenever a price drops in the first 24 hours after purchase, or when it drops more than the cost of the airline’s change fee, Yapta sends you an alert and you rebook at the lower price, paying the change fee and pocketing what’s left.

Airlines, having created so much volatility in their own pricing, are offering ways to beat the bounces, too. Last week, British Airways announced it would offer a 72-hour price hold for a flat fee of $10—useful if you see a good price but aren’t ready to commit to a nonrefundable ticket. That’s similar to United Airlines’s FareLock, where you pay $5 to $20 and lock in a price for either 72 hours or seven days.

(Read more from The Wall Street Journal: Five Things To Know Today .)

You could combine the two in a strategy to make sure you are getting the best price possible. Put a fare on hold and put Yapta to work. If the price drops during the hold period, you’ll get an alert and you can jump on it.

Yapta does what consumers or travel managers could do manually: It periodically rechecks the price of a ticket. Airlines don’t embrace the idea, and their pricy penalties for changing nonrefundable tickets limits how often travelers rebook. But neither have airlines put up a fight against Yapta. After all, they are the ones bouncing prices up and down.

When you search for an airline ticket, you usually see one price for a particular trip on specific dates. Airlines, though, actually load as many as two dozen different prices into reservation systems. A number of seats are offered at the lowest price in each class of service, and when those seats sell, reservation computers automatically display the next higher price as the best available.

Several times a day, airline pricing analysts and their computers can change the number of seats available at each price point, and they can change the prices themselves.

Mix in actual purchases and you get a rapidly changing pricing vortex that can anger and frustrate shoppers. One minute you see a good price; the next minute it’s a whole lot higher.

A lot happens between the time you buy and the time you fly,” says James Filsinger, Yapta’s chief executive of the Seattle-based company.

Yapta says its research shows some cities are a lot more volatile for airline prices than others. Tickets leaving from San Francisco were the most volatile of 15 major airports for business travel, Yapta found, and departures from New York’s LaGuardia Airport were the least volatile. San Francisco is a hub for both United Airlines and Virgin America, providing lots of pricing competition. La Guardia, with limited takeoff and landing slots, historically has lacked low-fare competition.

Started by a former airline pricing executive, Yapta now is run by Mr. Filsinger, a former executive at the reservation technology firm Sabre Group. Yapta takes fare data published by airlines and periodically tracks the lowest price available for a trip it is monitoring. So far working only on tickets sold in the U.S. Yapta says there are savings opportunities on 11.2% of all itineraries, after airline change fees.

Most of the chances to get money back come within the void window” of the first 24 hours after purchase. Corporate travel departments typically get a full business day.

When there were savings to be had, the average in a Yapta study of 150,000 itineraries booked from July through December 2013 was $306 after fees on tickets above $500, and $58 after fees on tickets under $500.

The Transportation Department requires at least a 24-hour cancellation window for tickets sold in the U.S. as long as the reservation is more than seven days before departure.

Most airlines charge the full price up front at the time of booking, but must give a full refund if canceled within 24 hours. (They don’t advertise that fact much.) American offers a 24-hour hold on reservations, without payment, instead of a refund in the 24-hour window.

ENLARGE

With corporate customers, Yapta loads its software into travel department booking systems. It doesn’t charge for the service but takes a cut of the savings, usually about 35%, Mr. Filsinger said. With consumers, use of the tracking tool is free. Companies, like consumers, can set a threshold on minimum savings before an alert is sent, to take into account change fees and other expenses. The company recently launched a similar system to check for falling hotel room prices, but so far that’s offered only to corporate travel departments and not consumers.

The bigger the fare, the bigger the potential savings, so travel managers say they have seen their most eye-popping results on international business-class tickets.

One Friday, Al Mazzola, director of travel services at Sykes Enterprises Inc. a Florida technology-consulting company, booked a $19,000 business-class ticket from Tampa to Shanghai and back, only to see it fall to $7,000 over the weekend. With the Yapta alert, the company grabbed the new price. I was stunned. I’ve never seen savings like that,” Mr. Mazzola said.

Mr. Mazzola has been using Yapta for more than a year and said he has saved more than $125,000, even after Yapta’s percentage and airline change fees. He said probably 90% of the savings comes in the void period, the first full business day after purchase.

Most of the price changes happen in the middle of the night, Mr. Mazzola says, and the new fares are usually still there when he gets to work around 7 a.m. on the East Coast.

Travel agents can rebook via computer when an alert comes in. The traveler keeps the same seat and the same reservation code. Mr. Mazzola sends an email to company travelers saying, Congratulations, we found a lower fare for you.”

Still, savings are too sporadic to justify booking a high-price ticket in the expectation that it will come down. The company tries always to book the lowest fare, he said.

Similar to United’s FareLock, which Continental Airlines first offered in 2010 shortly before its merger with United, is British Airways’s 72-hour hold option. It can help you hang on to a price if it turns out to be the lowest offered. British Airways said it refunds the deposit—$10 for flights from the U.S. €10 from Europe and £10 from the United Kingdom—if the ticket purchase is made. Seats can only be held 21 days or longer before departure.

The hold fee is offered through ba.com and includes code-sharing flights on partner airlines. A few destinations, including some in the Caribbean as well as Buenos Aires, Cairo, Lagos and some cities in India, aren’t available because of complex fluctuating tax calculations, British Airways said.

United said FareLock fees are nonrefundable even if you buy the ticket and can be used only with United and United Express flights, not Star Alliance partners. FareLock can be used to hold frequent-flier award tickets.

Corrections Amplifications

An earlier version should have stated that American Airlines complies with Transportation Department rules by offering a 24-hour hold period on reservations for nonrefundable tickets, instead of a 24-hour refund window. (Aug. 29, 2014)





02/08/2017

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The Best Ways to Book Cheaper Hotel Rates – TripIt Blog

#book hotels cheap
#

Book Last Minute

This is a trick best reserved for shorter trips, like romantic weekend getaways or impromptu get-togethers with friends in the city. I certainly wouldn’t advocate waiting till the last minute to book a hotel room for that expensive international trip you’ve been saving up for or leaving your lodging needs up to fate when there could be a major conference happening that results in a hotel room shortage. That being said, if you do a bit of research and are flexible, booking last minute can result in much cheaper rates. Last-minute booking apps like HotelTonight. which works with hotels to negotiate deep discounts on unsold rooms, are a great starting point, and many of the online booking sites, like Expedia and Priceline, have their own “Tonight” or “Deals Tonight” section.

Tip: Many sites offer last-minute deals sections, but are really just pulling the available inventory for the specified locale (not that this is a bad thing), as opposed to working with hotels to provide negotiated last-minute deals. Just be aware of this and shop around before committing to any last-minute deals.

Remember to use TripIt to organize all of your hotel confirmations (and any other trip confirmations) in one spot. You can also sign up for a free 30-day trial of TripIt Pro to try out premium features like alerts, alternate flights, seat tracker, point tracker, fare monitoring, and more.

(Photo by   401(K) 2013  / CC 2014)





14/07/2017

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United Airlines suing 22-year-old NYC man who figured out how to

#how to find cheapest flights
#

United Airlines suing 22-year-old NYC man who figured out how to get cheaper plane tickets

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NEW YORK (CNNMoney) — A young computer whiz from New York City has launched a site to help people buy cheap plane tickets. But an airline company and its travel partner want to shut him down.

United Airlines and Orbitz filed a civil lawsuit last month against 22-year-old Aktarer Zaman, who founded the website Skiplagged.com last year.

The site helps travelers find cheap flights by using a strategy called “hidden city” ticketing.

The idea is that you buy an airline ticket that has a layover at your actual destination. Say you want to fly from New York to San Francisco — you actually book a flight from New York to Lake Tahoe with a layover in San Francisco and get off there, without bothering to take the last leg of the flight.

This travel strategy only works if you book a one-way flight with no checked bags (they would have landed in Lake Tahoe).

Skiplagged.com now has a banner on the top of the site with a donation fund to support the creator’s legal defense.

It’s not like these tickets are the cheapest all the time, but they often are.

In the lawsuit, United and Orbitz call Skiplagged “unfair competition” and allege that it is promoting “strictly prohibited” travel. They want to recoup $75,000 in lost revenue from Zaman.

Zaman said he knew a lawsuit was inevitable but he points out that there’s nothing illegal about his web site.

He also said he has made no profit via the website and that all he’s done is help travelers get the best prices by exposing an “inefficiency,” in airline prices that insiders have known about for decades.

“[Hidden city ticketing] have been around for a while, it just hasn’t been very accessible to consumers,” Zaman told CNNMoney.

Indeed, “hidden city,” ticketing is no secret among frequent fliers, said Michael Boyd, President of Boyd Group International, an aviation consulting firm in Evergreen, Co. Boyd worked as an American Airline ticket agent 30 years ago, and says he was trained at the airline to help customers find “hidden city” fares.

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“I don’t think it’s illegal what he’s doing,” Boyd said. But lawsuits are expensive and it could end up costing the young entrepreneur who has irked the two billion dollar corporations.

Airlines usually offer cheaper fares for some destinations that are not regional hubs, Boyd said. Many of these flights are routed through more popular destinations. But if a lot of people take advantage of that discrepancy it could hurt the airlines, which is why they want to shut him down.

Born in Bangladesh, Zaman grew up in Brooklyn, N.Y. and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in computer science at age 20 from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He lives in Manhattan and works at a technology start-up that he declined to name.

Zaman said Skiplagged is just a “side project.”

Zaman and United declined to discuss the lawsuit. Orbitz said in a statement that it is obligated to uphold airline fare rules.

Other travel experts say that the airlines may not achieve much if Zaman’s site is shut down, especially in a world where information is becoming more readily available.

“If [Skiplagged is] shut down, undoubtedly there will be other people to come along to scrape fares and make them available,” said Robert Mann, president of R.W. Mann Company, an airline consulting firm in Port Washington, N.Y.

The-CNN-Wire

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12/07/2017

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Amtrak Discounts: A Guide to Cheaper Train Tickets #travel #link

#cheap train travel
#

Amtrak Discounts: A Guide to Cheaper Train Tickets

Use these promo codes and dedicated links to save up to 20% on your train ticket and up to 30% on a companion fare.

By Sascha Segan

Gas prices are headed up again, but Amtrak fares are holding steady — making our nation’s rail service a smart bet for your spring or summer getaway.

If you can plan ahead, there’s no reason to pay full price for most Amtrak tickets. Previously, you could enter promotion codes during the payment process on Amtrak.com . You can still do that with some discounts, but most price cuts now require you to book your trip through a dedicated link. Either way, you’ll still save 15%-20% on every ticket.

We’ve found so many Amtrak discounts that we’re segmenting them by region. You’re likely to find discounts for most popular routes with two gaping exceptions: There aren’t many discounts for the east-to-west cross-country routes, and there aren’t many discounts specifically for New York City.

Nationwide Amtrak Discounts

Before you start clicking links, make sure to check Amtrak’s Weekly Specials, on sale between Tuesday and Friday each week. These are deeply discounted fares (often up to 80% off) that can be for any train in the country. It’s a grab bag, but you might get lucky. Check them out here .

There’s an ongoing 25% discount (with a 14-day advance purchase) for Northeast Regional trains, the popular line that runs from Boston to D.C. The lower fares automatically turn up when you search, and they’re lower than most of the alternatives here. This means the alternatives are better for non-Northeast Regional trains, or for purchases between 3 and 14 days in advance.

Membership has its privileges. If you’re a senior citizen, U.S. military, or a member of AAA, Veterans’ Advantage, ISIC, Student Advantage, or the National Association of Rail Passengers, you can get a discount on Amtrak fares just by clicking the right box on Amtrak’s purchase page. High school juniors and seniors traveling with an adult can get a 50% discount by buying their tickets at www.campusvisit.com . NARP doesn’t have any membership requirements beyond the $35 annual fee, and it nets you a 10% discount.

All of these deals have some blackout dates: April 22, 24 and 25, May 27, July 1-2, Sept 2. and 5, Oct. 7, Nov. 22-23, and Nov. 26-28. None of them work with the high-speed Acela Express train. And all of them require you to buy your tickets 3 days in advance, so plan ahead.

New England Amtrak Discounts (ME, MA, VT, RI, CT)

Vermont really wants people to come by train. If you’re visiting Vermont from outside the state, book here for 20% off any trip through Oct. 31. But if you’re traveling within the state, book here for a flat $12 fare on any in-state trip, through Dec. 31.

If you’re traveling on the Downeaster train between Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine northbound in the morning and southbound in the afternoon/evening, you can get two tickets for the price of one by using discount code V773. That’s good through July 1, 2011. Up to two children can also ride free on that train with one paying adult if you use discount code V581 .

Massachusetts -bound travelers: For any train to Massachusetts (but not trips leaving Massachusetts) on the Downeaster, the Northeast Corridor, or the one daily train from Albany, you can get 20% off by booking here. Good for travel through Dec. 15, 2011.

For trips to/from Rhode Island. save 15% by booking here. Good for travel through Dec. 31, 2011.

For trips to/from Connecticut. save 20% by booking here. Good through March 31, 2011.

Mid-Atlantic Amtrak Discounts (NY, NJ, PA, DE, MD, DC, VA)

Traveling in New York State. or to Montreal. You have two good options. First, try booking with this link. which gets you 20% off any in-state (or Montreal) ticket for travel through May 31. If you’re riding the Adirondack train (that’s the Montreal train) on a Thursday-Sunday before April 28 and if the resulting fare is higher than $89 round-trip, use this link for an $89 Adirondack round-trip instead.

If you’re traveling to/from Philadelphia before July 13, use this link to save 15% off each ticket.

But if you’re traveling to/from Philadelphia between July 15 and Dec. 20, use this link to save 30% off a second ticket, which is like saving 15% off each ticket if you travel as a pair.

For 30% off a second ticket to/from Wilmington, DE. book here. Good for travel through Dec. 20, 2011.

For trips to/from Baltimore, MD. get 30% off a second ticket by booking here. Good for travel through Dec. 20, 2011.

For trips to/from BWI Airport, MD. get 30% off a second ticket by booking here. Good for travel through Dec. 20, 2011.

For trips to/from Washington, D.C.. get 30% off a second ticket by booking here. Good for travel through Dec. 20, 2011.

Southeast Amtrak Discounts

There aren’t many discounts in the Southeast right now, unfortunately. I’ve seen North Carolina discounts in the past, though, so keep your eyes out for future changes.

For trips to Orlando, Winter Park, and Kissimmee, FL on the Silver Star and Silver Meteor trains, you can get 15% off an adult fare by using discount code V104. Good for travel through Dec. 31, 2011.

Midwest Amtrak Discounts

Note that many of these discounts only cover short-distance trains — except for the St. Louis link, you can’t use them for the long interstate routes.

For trips to or from most Michigan cities on the short-distance Blue Water, Pere Marquette, and Wolverine trains, you can get 15% off by booking here. Good for travel through April 30, 2011.

For trips to or from any city in Illinois on the short-distance Carl Sandburg, Illini, Illinois Zephyr, Lincoln Service, and Saluki trains, you can get 20% off by booking here. Good through April 30, 2011. Note that this won’t get you a discount on long-distance trains that don’t originate in Illinois or Missouri.

For trips to or from St. Louis. MO on any train, you can get 20% off by booking here. Good for travel through May 2, 2011.

For trips to any city in Missouri on the short-distance Missouri River Runner train, you can get 15% off by booking here. Good for travel through April 30, 2011.

West Coast Amtrak Discounts

The Portland and Seattle versions of the “Chinook Book” coupon book include a 25%-off coupon for Amtrak Cascades trains, which run through Oregon, Washington, and up to Vancouver, B.C. The book costs $20, so it’s hard to make that math work if you’re just doing it for the Amtrak coupon. But the book has hundreds of coupons for either Portland or Seattle merchants that you might find otherwise helpful.

The East Bay and Silicon Valley, CA versions of the Chinook Book include buy-one-get-one-free coupons for the Capitol Corridor train. The same concerns as above apply; it might make sense if you intend to use more of the local coupons. You can find the full list of coupons at www.chinookbook.net .

For trips to Santa Barbara, Goleta, Carpinteria, Solvang, Buellton, Lompoc, Surf, Guadalupe, and Santa Maria, CA on the Pacific Surfliner or San Joaquin trains, you can get 20% off by clicking here. Good through Dec. 19. 2011.

For trips to Grover Beach, San Luis Obispo, and Paso Robles, CA on the Pacific Surfliner or Coast Starlight trains, you can get 20% off by signing up here. Good for travel through Dec. 31, 2011.

Have you uncovered any other great Amtrak discount codes?





10/06/2017

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How I – Hacked – Kayak and Booked a Cheaper Flight

#where to get cheap airline tickets
#

​How I Hacked Kayak and Booked a Cheaper Flight

Let me start this out by saying I didn’t hack something in the black hat Hackers way, but by finding a market inefficiency and leveraging it to my advantage. It must be the day trader in me. No harm was done to any computers or systems in the making of this post.

TL;DR: I booked a flight through Kayak using a VPN and saved

$100.

Long version: I was looking for flights to New Orleans when I realized that the flight price I checked yesterday was

$100 cheaper. I started to think why the price went up so much in one day and tried checking the flight again using only Google Incognito but there was no price budge. Maybe my VPN had something to do with it? The night before I was using a VPN (I use BTGuard btw) and Kayak thought I was from Toronto, Canada. I guess if you are not from the departure city then flights are cheaper?

So what did I do?

So I had originally went to Kayak today and checked flights from Miami to New Orleans (Mardi Gras, w00t!). This was done without a VPN but using Google’s Incognito feature. Take a look at how much the flights were:





29/05/2017

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Flexible dates means cheaper airfare #jayco #travel #trailers

#search for cheap airline tickets
#

Cheap Airfares

Get cheaper fares by being flexible with your travel dates

If you insist on traveling on specific days, you’ll pay a lot more for airfares. But if you’re flexible about exactly when you leave and return, you can get much better deals. This is our #1 tip for getting the cheapest airfare! It bears repeating: Be flexible, pay less.

Sample fares we just checked:

  • $444 – Leave on the 5th and insist on returning on the 7th
  • $333 – Leave on the 5th and willing to return on the 8th

Use the services below to get great deals when your travel plans have some leeway.

Search Engines

Most search engines now do flexible-date searches. Here’s how the different engines handle them:

  • Kayak is usually the best. When you put in your cities, it shows you a calendar of the lowest fares for each day of the month. Sweet! The catch is that it shows you only fares for city/date combos that other users have already searched for. If you’re doing a popular route (like NYC to LA), you’ll likely see a price for every day, but going from Somewhere, Idaho to Somewhere, Montana there’s gonna be some holes in the calendar. But even if the calendar doesn’t have the dates you want, Kayak also has more powerful flexible-dates searching than the other engines. You can choose +/- 1-3 days, or search all upcoming weekends for the cheapest one, or find the cheapest flight occurring in a one-month period. Nice!
  • Skyscanner . Search for flexible dates for a whole month or even a whole year! The catch is the same as Kayak’s: It shows only cached results from specific searches that other users have done.
  • Travelocity and Orbitz each has a button that lets you search +/- 1-3 days.
  • Hipmunk lets you search + OR – 2 days from the departure or return date you type in, but not both + AND – at the same time. There’s a way to get a calendar similar to Kayak’s but it’s rather complicated. I hope they fix this.

    Weekly Netfares

    Every Wednesday the airlines offer deep discounts on undersold flights for that weekend. Downsides: You usually have to leave on Thu/Fri/Sat and return on Sun/Mon, and your choices of cities are limited. As I’m typing this, the only trips available from Austin are Denver ($147) or El Paso ($87), but those are excellent deals for roundtrip airfare.

    Rather than having to visit each airline website separately, just go to Best Fares and choose the city you want to travel from. Then they’ll show you all the deals from all the major airlines. Many of these are decidedly cheap.

    Of course, you can sign up at the individual airlines’ sites if you prefer. Here are the links:

    Fare Alerts by email

    Lots of sites offer a “Fare Alert” service, sending you an email about low fares between particular cities. But you only need one, and Kayak’s fare alert service is pretty good.

    Cheapest flights from your city

    Airfare Watchdog lets you put in your departure city, and then shows the cheapest fares from there to various cities around the country and the world.

    Portals / Home Pages

    Thanks for visiting, and I hope you liked the site. I’ll leave you with a couple of hand-picked ads.





    17/05/2017

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  • AIRLINE TICKETS – Fly Cheaper using my Award Travel Miles #travel

    #fly tickets
    #

    AIRLINE TICKETS – Fly Cheaper using my Award Travel Miles – $480 (SAN DIEGO)

    *** FREE with Ticket purchase below: Sharper Image Ionic Breeze Compact Quadra

    (Air Purifier). In original box/packaging with user manual. Originally paid $125.

    This airline ticket offer is ONLY for those who know EXACTLY what itinerary they want (airline,

    flight #’s, dates). I DO NOT search for flights or provide quotes. ALL/Lowest, non-negotiable,

    “still available”, RT ticket prices are $480+tax/fees. You are purchasing 25,000 Award Travel points

    for this price. Max 2 RT tickets (50K pts). Please READ/UNDERSTAND/COMPLY w/ENTIRE Ad.

    I DO NOT RESPOND TO QUESTIONS (OR “ANONYMOUS” EMAILS) THAT CAN BE

    ANSWERED BY READING THIS AD (see NOTE 1-3 below).

    I purchase RT tickets using my miles. This offer is ONLY good for airline advertised ticket prices

    GREATER than $700. So for $480 (plus taxes/fee), you get a COACH/ECONOMY round-trip

    ticket to/from anywhere in the United States (EXCEPT HAWAII), Canada or Mexico, on

    UNITED, AMERICAN, DELTA or SOUTHWEST airlines.

    A) YOU MUST first find your EXACT itinerary online. Note: Smartphone apps may not show

    award travel levels. Use browser on PC/Tablet. Use the “Redeem Miles”, “Award Travel”,

    or “Points”/”Miles” option on the AIRLINE’s main web page. SEND SCREENSHOTS (for A and B).

    B) YOU MUST check/verify that your ENTIRE itinerary is available for AWARD TRAVEL

    AT 12,500 MILES (points) EACH WAY (that’s 25,000 miles/points total round-trip).

    C) YOU MUST replace subject line with: “I NEED 25k pts for RT TICKET for $480+tax”.

    No response if you don’t confirm you understand that this is what I’m offering ONLY.

    NOTE: I ONLY respond to individuals who are serious enough to find their desired

    flights and LEAVE ALL of this info in their FIRST REPLY: 1) NAME, 2) PHONE NUMBER,





    30/04/2017

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    How I – Hacked – Kayak and Booked a Cheaper Flight

    #where to get cheap airline tickets
    #

    ​How I Hacked Kayak and Booked a Cheaper Flight

    Let me start this out by saying I didn’t hack something in the black hat Hackers way, but by finding a market inefficiency and leveraging it to my advantage. It must be the day trader in me. No harm was done to any computers or systems in the making of this post.

    TL;DR: I booked a flight through Kayak using a VPN and saved

    $100.

    Long version: I was looking for flights to New Orleans when I realized that the flight price I checked yesterday was

    $100 cheaper. I started to think why the price went up so much in one day and tried checking the flight again using only Google Incognito but there was no price budge. Maybe my VPN had something to do with it? The night before I was using a VPN (I use BTGuard btw) and Kayak thought I was from Toronto, Canada. I guess if you are not from the departure city then flights are cheaper?

    So what did I do?

    So I had originally went to Kayak today and checked flights from Miami to New Orleans (Mardi Gras, w00t!). This was done without a VPN but using Google’s Incognito feature. Take a look at how much the flights were:





    21/04/2017

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    How to Find Cheaper Airline Tickets #travel #buddy

    #find airline tickets
    #

    How to Find Cheaper Airline Tickets

    When I first started traveling (and was very broke) I would spend hours, sometimes even days, searching websites for the best deals on tickets. Over time I learned a few tricks. I talked to other travelers and travel professionals about how they found cheap flights. After a while I came up with a formula for finding the good prices on plane tickets. Now I spend on average 2-4 hours searching for a ticket, but I pretty much always a deal that s significantly cheaper that s what most people pay. Not long ago I booked a ticket from San Francisco to Taipei for $516 during at time of year when the vast majority of websites produced tickets that cost from $700 $1000 or more. That s about 25 50% cheaper than an average ticket and that s a pretty good example of the price that I usually pay compared to the norm. These are seven simple things that you can do to keep your flight costs as low as possible without wasting too much time searching for tickets.

    1) Fly Tuesday Thursday

    Ticket prices are set according to demand, so the cheapest tickets can be found on the days with the least demand. Most people, especially business people, fly on Mondays and Fridays, so those days tend to be the most expensive, while midweek flights are usually cheaper. I’ve had the best luck flying on Wednesdays (and occasionally Sundays), but it’s always good to check flights on several different days before purchasing a ticket.

    2) Be Flexible About Flight Dates

    If your flight dates are flexible, you may be able to find a much better price checking prices in a range of around three or four weeks. The prices of flights can vary dramatically from one week to the next. Waiting an extra seven days has saved me hundreds of dollars on a single flight before.

    3) Be Flexible About Airports

    If you are in or near a large center, check schedules that leave from all of the nearby airports. Small budget airlines often don t fly to major airports, but to nearby secondary ones. Those budget airlines are often much cheaper than the bigger ones.

    4) Check Prices Early on Wednesday Mornings

    This tip is not my own, but I believe its effective. According to Nora Dunn, a certified budget travel expert, airline companies usually set prices on Tuesdays around midnight, and that they sometimes post special temporary seat sales at this time.

    5) Check Local Budget Airlines

    Most regions of the world are served by budget airlines that don’t show up in big search engines. Which budget is a search engine that will tell you which budget airlines fly the route that you are looking for. Check those airlines websites for normal and special fares. They often have amazing deals. I have flown from Taipei to Manila round-trip for less than $50 on a local budget carrier before (mind you, the flight landed at Clark International Airport near Angeles City, rather than Manila International Airport, as I mentioned in tip #3).

    6)  Check All Possible Booking Options

    Different flight booking websites usually charge different prices for the same flight. To save time, I use price meta-search engines, like Booking Wiz and Fare Compare, that compare several booking websites at the same time.  After I have found a few flights that look promising, I check the airlines’ websites to see if they offer a better price for the flight or have any special deals. Sometimes the airline website is cheaper. Sometimes the booking engine is. Airlines also have different websites to serve different countries. If you ve found a flight that you re interested in buying directly through the airline s website, try logging into a the same airline s website for a different country (Canada, or the UK for example). Sometimes in the rounding up or down or prices and the exchange of currency you ll find an even better deal.

    7) Track the Flight s Price

    Yapta  is a flight search engine that allows you to track changes in ticket prices over time. Just search for your desired route, then find the tickets you re interested, and click on Track Price Drops . You will have to enter your name and email address. After that, Yapta will send you an email every time the price of one of your selected tickets changes. That way, if the airline drops the price for some reason (it happens regularly) you can snap up the ticket right away. Alternatively, if you have already purchased your ticket you can still track the price and request the airline to refund you the difference if one day you see the price drop below what you paid.

    Conclusion

    I m not the most talented travel hacker out there, but I don t aspire to be. I don t care to spend more than a few hours looking for a cheap flight. After that I prefer to spend my time doing fun things, rather than trying to whittle an extra $30 off my ticket.  If you re like me, then this guide should be all you need to save a bit of money without wasting too much of your valuable time.





    21/04/2017

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    United Airlines sues 22-year-old who found method for buying cheaper plane

    #find airline tickets
    #

    United Airlines sues 22-year-old who found method for buying cheaper plane tickets

    [FILE] United Airlines jets are parked at the terminal at O Hare International Airport in Chicago, Illinois on Oct. 25, 2013. Credit: Ricky Shine/CNN

    By Patrick Gillespie for CNN

    NEW YORK A young computer whiz from New York City has launched a site to help people buy cheap plane tickets. But an airline company and its travel partner want to shut him down.

    United Airlines and Orbitz filed a civil lawsuit last month against 22-year-old Aktarer Zaman, who founded the website Skiplagged.com last year.

    The site helps travelers find cheap flights by using a strategy called hidden city ticketing.

    The idea is that you buy an airline ticket that has a layover at your actual destination. Say you want to fly from New York to San Francisco you actually book a flight from New York to Lake Tahoe with a layover in San Francisco and get off there, without bothering to take the last leg of the flight.

    This travel strategy only works if you book a one-way flight with no checked bags (they would have landed in Lake Tahoe).

    It s not like these tickets are the cheapest all the time, but they often are.

    In the lawsuit, United and Orbitz call Skiplagged unfair competition and allege that it is promoting strictly prohibited travel. They want to recoup $75,000 in lost revenue from Zaman.

    Zaman said he knew a lawsuit was inevitable but he points out that there s nothing illegal about his web site.

    He also said he has made no profit via the website and that all he s done is help travelers get the best prices by exposing an inefficiency, in airline prices that insiders have known about for decades.

    [Hidden city ticketing] have been around for a while, it just hasn t been very accessible to consumers, Zaman told CNNMoney.

    Indeed, hidden city, ticketing is no secret among frequent fliers, said Michael Boyd, President of Boyd Group International, an aviation consulting firm in Evergreen, Co. Boyd worked as an American Airline ticket agent 30 years ago, and says he was trained at the airline to help customers find hidden city fares.

    I don t think it s illegal what he s doing, Boyd said. But lawsuits are expensive and it could end up costing the young entrepreneur who has irked the two billion dollar corporations.

    Airlines usually offer cheaper fares for some destinations that are not regional hubs, Boyd said. Many of these flights are routed through more popular destinations. But if a lot of people take advantage of that discrepancy it could hurt the airlines, which is why they want to shut him down.

    Born in Bangladesh, Zaman grew up in Brooklyn, N.Y. and graduated with a bachelor s degree in computer science at age 20 from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He lives in Manhattan and works at a technology start-up that he declined to name.

    Zaman said Skiplagged is just a side project.

    Zaman and United declined to discuss the lawsuit. Orbitz said in a statement that it is obligated to uphold airline fare rules.

    Other travel experts say that the airlines may not achieve much if Zaman s site is shut down, especially in a world where information is becoming more readily available.

    If [Skiplagged is] shut down, undoubtedly there will be other people to come along to scrape fares and make them available, Robert Mann said, president of R.W. Mann Company, an airline consulting firm in Port Washington, New York.

    Trademark and Copyright 2015 Cable News Network. Inc. a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.





    10/04/2017

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    Flexible dates means cheaper airfare #cheap #flying #tickets

    #search for cheap airline tickets
    #

    Cheap Airfares

    Get cheaper fares by being flexible with your travel dates

    If you insist on traveling on specific days, you’ll pay a lot more for airfares. But if you’re flexible about exactly when you leave and return, you can get much better deals. This is our #1 tip for getting the cheapest airfare! It bears repeating: Be flexible, pay less.

    Sample fares we just checked:

    • $444 – Leave on the 5th and insist on returning on the 7th
    • $333 – Leave on the 5th and willing to return on the 8th

    Use the services below to get great deals when your travel plans have some leeway.

    Search Engines

    Most search engines now do flexible-date searches. Here’s how the different engines handle them:

    • Kayak is usually the best. When you put in your cities, it shows you a calendar of the lowest fares for each day of the month. Sweet! The catch is that it shows you only fares for city/date combos that other users have already searched for. If you’re doing a popular route (like NYC to LA), you’ll likely see a price for every day, but going from Somewhere, Idaho to Somewhere, Montana there’s gonna be some holes in the calendar. But even if the calendar doesn’t have the dates you want, Kayak also has more powerful flexible-dates searching than the other engines. You can choose +/- 1-3 days, or search all upcoming weekends for the cheapest one, or find the cheapest flight occurring in a one-month period. Nice!
  • Skyscanner . Search for flexible dates for a whole month or even a whole year! The catch is the same as Kayak’s: It shows only cached results from specific searches that other users have done.
  • Travelocity and Orbitz each has a button that lets you search +/- 1-3 days.
  • Hipmunk lets you search + OR – 2 days from the departure or return date you type in, but not both + AND – at the same time. There’s a way to get a calendar similar to Kayak’s but it’s rather complicated. I hope they fix this.

    Weekly Netfares

    Every Wednesday the airlines offer deep discounts on undersold flights for that weekend. Downsides: You usually have to leave on Thu/Fri/Sat and return on Sun/Mon, and your choices of cities are limited. As I’m typing this, the only trips available from Austin are Denver ($147) or El Paso ($87), but those are excellent deals for roundtrip airfare.

    Rather than having to visit each airline website separately, just go to Best Fares and choose the city you want to travel from. Then they’ll show you all the deals from all the major airlines. Many of these are decidedly cheap.

    Of course, you can sign up at the individual airlines’ sites if you prefer. Here are the links:

    Fare Alerts by email

    Lots of sites offer a “Fare Alert” service, sending you an email about low fares between particular cities. But you only need one, and Kayak’s fare alert service is pretty good.

    Cheapest flights from your city

    Airfare Watchdog lets you put in your departure city, and then shows the cheapest fares from there to various cities around the country and the world.

    Portals / Home Pages

    Thanks for visiting, and I hope you liked the site. I’ll leave you with a couple of hand-picked ads.





    05/04/2017

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  • Yapta Alerts You to a Cheaper Airfare in Time to Rebook

    #find cheap airfare
    #

    Even After Cancellation Fees, Travelers Say They Save by Buying a New Ticket at a Lower Price

    Updated Aug. 29, 2014 1:04 p.m. ET

    Searching for a Labor Day weekend plane ticket home for my daughter, I saw an attractive $432 fare on American Airlines. I sent her the details and she responded within 90 minutes.

    Airfares bounce up and down, often frustrating and angering travelers. But can you get a better price after you buy? WSJ s Middle Seat columnist Scott McCartney joins Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero with the answer. Photo: Getty

    Yapta, which began tracking airfares in 2007, has turned its fare-searching technology into a corporate tool to hunt for lower fares and hotel room rates after trips are booked. It’s available to consumers at yapta.com.

    Whenever a price drops in the first 24 hours after purchase, or when it drops more than the cost of the airline’s change fee, Yapta sends you an alert and you rebook at the lower price, paying the change fee and pocketing what’s left.

    Airlines, having created so much volatility in their own pricing, are offering ways to beat the bounces, too. Last week, British Airways announced it would offer a 72-hour price hold for a flat fee of $10—useful if you see a good price but aren’t ready to commit to a nonrefundable ticket. That’s similar to United Airlines’s FareLock, where you pay $5 to $20 and lock in a price for either 72 hours or seven days.

    (Read more from The Wall Street Journal: Five Things To Know Today .)

    You could combine the two in a strategy to make sure you are getting the best price possible. Put a fare on hold and put Yapta to work. If the price drops during the hold period, you’ll get an alert and you can jump on it.

    Yapta does what consumers or travel managers could do manually: It periodically rechecks the price of a ticket. Airlines don’t embrace the idea, and their pricy penalties for changing nonrefundable tickets limits how often travelers rebook. But neither have airlines put up a fight against Yapta. After all, they are the ones bouncing prices up and down.

    When you search for an airline ticket, you usually see one price for a particular trip on specific dates. Airlines, though, actually load as many as two dozen different prices into reservation systems. A number of seats are offered at the lowest price in each class of service, and when those seats sell, reservation computers automatically display the next higher price as the best available.

    Several times a day, airline pricing analysts and their computers can change the number of seats available at each price point, and they can change the prices themselves.

    Mix in actual purchases and you get a rapidly changing pricing vortex that can anger and frustrate shoppers. One minute you see a good price; the next minute it’s a whole lot higher.

    A lot happens between the time you buy and the time you fly,” says James Filsinger, Yapta’s chief executive of the Seattle-based company.

    Yapta says its research shows some cities are a lot more volatile for airline prices than others. Tickets leaving from San Francisco were the most volatile of 15 major airports for business travel, Yapta found, and departures from New York’s LaGuardia Airport were the least volatile. San Francisco is a hub for both United Airlines and Virgin America, providing lots of pricing competition. La Guardia, with limited takeoff and landing slots, historically has lacked low-fare competition.

    Started by a former airline pricing executive, Yapta now is run by Mr. Filsinger, a former executive at the reservation technology firm Sabre Group. Yapta takes fare data published by airlines and periodically tracks the lowest price available for a trip it is monitoring. So far working only on tickets sold in the U.S. Yapta says there are savings opportunities on 11.2% of all itineraries, after airline change fees.

    Most of the chances to get money back come within the void window” of the first 24 hours after purchase. Corporate travel departments typically get a full business day.

    When there were savings to be had, the average in a Yapta study of 150,000 itineraries booked from July through December 2013 was $306 after fees on tickets above $500, and $58 after fees on tickets under $500.

    The Transportation Department requires at least a 24-hour cancellation window for tickets sold in the U.S. as long as the reservation is more than seven days before departure.

    Most airlines charge the full price up front at the time of booking, but must give a full refund if canceled within 24 hours. (They don’t advertise that fact much.) American offers a 24-hour hold on reservations, without payment, instead of a refund in the 24-hour window.

    ENLARGE

    With corporate customers, Yapta loads its software into travel department booking systems. It doesn’t charge for the service but takes a cut of the savings, usually about 35%, Mr. Filsinger said. With consumers, use of the tracking tool is free. Companies, like consumers, can set a threshold on minimum savings before an alert is sent, to take into account change fees and other expenses. The company recently launched a similar system to check for falling hotel room prices, but so far that’s offered only to corporate travel departments and not consumers.

    The bigger the fare, the bigger the potential savings, so travel managers say they have seen their most eye-popping results on international business-class tickets.

    One Friday, Al Mazzola, director of travel services at Sykes Enterprises Inc. a Florida technology-consulting company, booked a $19,000 business-class ticket from Tampa to Shanghai and back, only to see it fall to $7,000 over the weekend. With the Yapta alert, the company grabbed the new price. I was stunned. I’ve never seen savings like that,” Mr. Mazzola said.

    Mr. Mazzola has been using Yapta for more than a year and said he has saved more than $125,000, even after Yapta’s percentage and airline change fees. He said probably 90% of the savings comes in the void period, the first full business day after purchase.

    Most of the price changes happen in the middle of the night, Mr. Mazzola says, and the new fares are usually still there when he gets to work around 7 a.m. on the East Coast.

    Travel agents can rebook via computer when an alert comes in. The traveler keeps the same seat and the same reservation code. Mr. Mazzola sends an email to company travelers saying, Congratulations, we found a lower fare for you.”

    Still, savings are too sporadic to justify booking a high-price ticket in the expectation that it will come down. The company tries always to book the lowest fare, he said.

    Similar to United’s FareLock, which Continental Airlines first offered in 2010 shortly before its merger with United, is British Airways’s 72-hour hold option. It can help you hang on to a price if it turns out to be the lowest offered. British Airways said it refunds the deposit—$10 for flights from the U.S. €10 from Europe and £10 from the United Kingdom—if the ticket purchase is made. Seats can only be held 21 days or longer before departure.

    The hold fee is offered through ba.com and includes code-sharing flights on partner airlines. A few destinations, including some in the Caribbean as well as Buenos Aires, Cairo, Lagos and some cities in India, aren’t available because of complex fluctuating tax calculations, British Airways said.

    United said FareLock fees are nonrefundable even if you buy the ticket and can be used only with United and United Express flights, not Star Alliance partners. FareLock can be used to hold frequent-flier award tickets.

    Corrections Amplifications

    An earlier version should have stated that American Airlines complies with Transportation Department rules by offering a 24-hour hold period on reservations for nonrefundable tickets, instead of a 24-hour refund window. (Aug. 29, 2014)





    14/03/2017

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    Amtrak Discounts: A Guide to Cheaper Train Tickets #travel #bag

    #cheap train travel
    #

    Amtrak Discounts: A Guide to Cheaper Train Tickets

    Use these promo codes and dedicated links to save up to 20% on your train ticket and up to 30% on a companion fare.

    By Sascha Segan

    Gas prices are headed up again, but Amtrak fares are holding steady — making our nation’s rail service a smart bet for your spring or summer getaway.

    If you can plan ahead, there’s no reason to pay full price for most Amtrak tickets. Previously, you could enter promotion codes during the payment process on Amtrak.com . You can still do that with some discounts, but most price cuts now require you to book your trip through a dedicated link. Either way, you’ll still save 15%-20% on every ticket.

    We’ve found so many Amtrak discounts that we’re segmenting them by region. You’re likely to find discounts for most popular routes with two gaping exceptions: There aren’t many discounts for the east-to-west cross-country routes, and there aren’t many discounts specifically for New York City.

    Nationwide Amtrak Discounts

    Before you start clicking links, make sure to check Amtrak’s Weekly Specials, on sale between Tuesday and Friday each week. These are deeply discounted fares (often up to 80% off) that can be for any train in the country. It’s a grab bag, but you might get lucky. Check them out here .

    There’s an ongoing 25% discount (with a 14-day advance purchase) for Northeast Regional trains, the popular line that runs from Boston to D.C. The lower fares automatically turn up when you search, and they’re lower than most of the alternatives here. This means the alternatives are better for non-Northeast Regional trains, or for purchases between 3 and 14 days in advance.

    Membership has its privileges. If you’re a senior citizen, U.S. military, or a member of AAA, Veterans’ Advantage, ISIC, Student Advantage, or the National Association of Rail Passengers, you can get a discount on Amtrak fares just by clicking the right box on Amtrak’s purchase page. High school juniors and seniors traveling with an adult can get a 50% discount by buying their tickets at www.campusvisit.com . NARP doesn’t have any membership requirements beyond the $35 annual fee, and it nets you a 10% discount.

    All of these deals have some blackout dates: April 22, 24 and 25, May 27, July 1-2, Sept 2. and 5, Oct. 7, Nov. 22-23, and Nov. 26-28. None of them work with the high-speed Acela Express train. And all of them require you to buy your tickets 3 days in advance, so plan ahead.

    New England Amtrak Discounts (ME, MA, VT, RI, CT)

    Vermont really wants people to come by train. If you’re visiting Vermont from outside the state, book here for 20% off any trip through Oct. 31. But if you’re traveling within the state, book here for a flat $12 fare on any in-state trip, through Dec. 31.

    If you’re traveling on the Downeaster train between Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine northbound in the morning and southbound in the afternoon/evening, you can get two tickets for the price of one by using discount code V773. That’s good through July 1, 2011. Up to two children can also ride free on that train with one paying adult if you use discount code V581 .

    Massachusetts -bound travelers: For any train to Massachusetts (but not trips leaving Massachusetts) on the Downeaster, the Northeast Corridor, or the one daily train from Albany, you can get 20% off by booking here. Good for travel through Dec. 15, 2011.

    For trips to/from Rhode Island. save 15% by booking here. Good for travel through Dec. 31, 2011.

    For trips to/from Connecticut. save 20% by booking here. Good through March 31, 2011.

    Mid-Atlantic Amtrak Discounts (NY, NJ, PA, DE, MD, DC, VA)

    Traveling in New York State. or to Montreal. You have two good options. First, try booking with this link. which gets you 20% off any in-state (or Montreal) ticket for travel through May 31. If you’re riding the Adirondack train (that’s the Montreal train) on a Thursday-Sunday before April 28 and if the resulting fare is higher than $89 round-trip, use this link for an $89 Adirondack round-trip instead.

    If you’re traveling to/from Philadelphia before July 13, use this link to save 15% off each ticket.

    But if you’re traveling to/from Philadelphia between July 15 and Dec. 20, use this link to save 30% off a second ticket, which is like saving 15% off each ticket if you travel as a pair.

    For 30% off a second ticket to/from Wilmington, DE. book here. Good for travel through Dec. 20, 2011.

    For trips to/from Baltimore, MD. get 30% off a second ticket by booking here. Good for travel through Dec. 20, 2011.

    For trips to/from BWI Airport, MD. get 30% off a second ticket by booking here. Good for travel through Dec. 20, 2011.

    For trips to/from Washington, D.C.. get 30% off a second ticket by booking here. Good for travel through Dec. 20, 2011.

    Southeast Amtrak Discounts

    There aren’t many discounts in the Southeast right now, unfortunately. I’ve seen North Carolina discounts in the past, though, so keep your eyes out for future changes.

    For trips to Orlando, Winter Park, and Kissimmee, FL on the Silver Star and Silver Meteor trains, you can get 15% off an adult fare by using discount code V104. Good for travel through Dec. 31, 2011.

    Midwest Amtrak Discounts

    Note that many of these discounts only cover short-distance trains — except for the St. Louis link, you can’t use them for the long interstate routes.

    For trips to or from most Michigan cities on the short-distance Blue Water, Pere Marquette, and Wolverine trains, you can get 15% off by booking here. Good for travel through April 30, 2011.

    For trips to or from any city in Illinois on the short-distance Carl Sandburg, Illini, Illinois Zephyr, Lincoln Service, and Saluki trains, you can get 20% off by booking here. Good through April 30, 2011. Note that this won’t get you a discount on long-distance trains that don’t originate in Illinois or Missouri.

    For trips to or from St. Louis. MO on any train, you can get 20% off by booking here. Good for travel through May 2, 2011.

    For trips to any city in Missouri on the short-distance Missouri River Runner train, you can get 15% off by booking here. Good for travel through April 30, 2011.

    West Coast Amtrak Discounts

    The Portland and Seattle versions of the “Chinook Book” coupon book include a 25%-off coupon for Amtrak Cascades trains, which run through Oregon, Washington, and up to Vancouver, B.C. The book costs $20, so it’s hard to make that math work if you’re just doing it for the Amtrak coupon. But the book has hundreds of coupons for either Portland or Seattle merchants that you might find otherwise helpful.

    The East Bay and Silicon Valley, CA versions of the Chinook Book include buy-one-get-one-free coupons for the Capitol Corridor train. The same concerns as above apply; it might make sense if you intend to use more of the local coupons. You can find the full list of coupons at www.chinookbook.net .

    For trips to Santa Barbara, Goleta, Carpinteria, Solvang, Buellton, Lompoc, Surf, Guadalupe, and Santa Maria, CA on the Pacific Surfliner or San Joaquin trains, you can get 20% off by clicking here. Good through Dec. 19. 2011.

    For trips to Grover Beach, San Luis Obispo, and Paso Robles, CA on the Pacific Surfliner or Coast Starlight trains, you can get 20% off by signing up here. Good for travel through Dec. 31, 2011.

    Have you uncovered any other great Amtrak discount codes?





    13/02/2017

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    A Clever Secret to Getting a Cheaper Airfare #train #travel #europe

    #airfare and hotel packages
    #

    A Clever Secret to Getting a Cheaper Airfare

    There’s a secret in the travel world that, once discovered, can make you feel like a great explorer.

    Suddenly, you’re Marco Polo stumbling onto an overland trade route to China or Magellan finding his way around Cape Horn. This secret is truly sensational — something that could even change the way you look at the world. of great deals on airfare.

    It happens as simply as booking a deal for a roundtrip transatlantic flight for more than $800 less than the normal ticket price by adding on a rental car. That’s right: book more, pay much less.

    Normally, if you’re booking a trip for a week or so, you only get a cheap fare if you stay over at least one Saturday. Book a Monday through Friday flight, as many business travelers do, and the airlines gouge you. However, if you fly British Airways and book a package deal through its website (flight + rental car, hotel, etc.), you are granted access to the super-secret cheapo rates.

    Evidence our sample booking. We were looking for a flight from Chicago to London. and the lowest fare we found for our Monday – Friday itinerary was $1,855 on the British Airways website. But when we clicked on the “flight + car” package option, the total price dropped to $1,044.

    Tips for Finding Cheap Airfare

    We wanted answers. We called one of BA’s agents, who confirmed that, indeed, you can get this kind of deal routinely by booking a package. “When we’re selling holidays, we’re a tour operator and we have preferential rates, which we’re able to pass. on to the consumer,” said Tracy Long of British Airways Holidays. “If you’re booking anything more than just a flight, you’re able to take advantage of deeper discounts.”

    In this case, booking a package may also have dropped us into the leisure travel category, which usually offers cheaper rates than those for business travelers. The savings aren’t always astounding, yet considering that you are getting more — in some cases much more — you win if you bundle your travel elements together as opposed to booking each independently.

    Consider a roundtrip flight on Virgin Atlantic from New York to London that we sampled at $1,855. When we used the Virgin Vacations search to include four nights’ hotel and a four-day car rental, we got the entire package from $1,864 per person — just $9 more for a hotel and rental car as well as a flight.

    Using an aggregate site such as Expedia.com can save you money as well. A flight on Air Berlin from Miami to Helsinki would set us back $1,268. On Expedia.com, we’d pay $1,249 — $19 less — for a flight plus four nights in a three-star hotel.

    How to Create the Perfect Itinerary

    Not all airline websites make it as easy to bundle a hotel or car rental as others. Finnair, for example, doesn’t offer a bundling option, while Aer Lingus and Icelandair offer only their own prepackaged vacations, which may or may not suit your needs. American Airlines’ site has a “Round-Trip + Hotel” button, while Delta provides both package deals and build-your-own options.

    Be warned that bundling is not always cheaper, so you’ll want to check the individual pricing as well. If you don’t actually need a car or hotel, you should not try to book a bundle anyway, lest your entire booking be voided by your failure to pick up your rental or show up at your hotel. Finally, keep in mind that packages nearly always include larger hotels, which might not be your cup of tea if you’re inclined to stay in B updated by Sarah Schlichter





    12/02/2017

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    Airline sues man for finding cheaper flights #travel #leaders

    #find flights cheap
    #

    22-year-old cashes in using ‘hidden city’ ticketing

    A 22-year-old whiz kid who found a way for fliers to buy cheaper plane tickets is now being sued by United Airlines and its travel partner, Orbitz.

    Aktarer Zaman of New York City founded the Skiplagged website, which promotes a strategy known as hidden city ticketing to find more inexpensive prices.

    Travelers merely buy an airline ticket with a layover before the actual destination.

    For example, if you wanted to fly from New York to San Francisco, you could purchase a ticket from New York to Lake Tahoe, California, and then fly to San Francisco where you d get off the plane, never boarding the final leg of the trip to Lake Tahoe.

    Aktarer Zaman

    The strategy only works when flying one way and checking no luggage, since the bags would be sent to the final destination.

    According to the lawsuit. Hidden city ticketing is strictly prohibited by most commercial airlines because of logistical and public safety concerns. When consumers purchase a flight through United, they agree to be bound by United s prohibition against hidden city ticketing. Also, as further protection against this prohibited form of travel, airlines often require online travel agencies, such as Orbitz, to prohibit hidden city ticketing and other abusive practices.

    The suit seeks $75,000 in damages as well as the closure of Skiplagged.

    Zaman told CNNMoney he knew a lawsuit was inevitable but claims there s nothing illegal about his site.

    He said he hasn t earned a profit, and all he has done is help travelers by exposing an inefficiency in airline prices of which insiders have been aware for decades.

    [Hidden-city discounts] have been around for a while, it just hasn t been very accessible to consumers, Zaman said.

    Zaman now has a message on his discount site, reading: Consumers, Skiplagged needs your help! United Airlines and Orbitz recently filed a lawsuit that can force us to remove results only we find, getting in the way of saving you lots of money on airfare. Please support Skiplagged by donating to our legal fund here. Thank you!

    By Tuesday afternoon, more than $23,000 had been raised.

    I really don t know how much this lawsuit is going to ultimately cost, other than probably a lot, Zaman noted. However, you have my word that how every cent is spent will be posted here. If there are any remaining funds, those will be completely donated to charity.

    Michael Boyd, an aviation consultant with Boyd Group International in Evergreen, Colorado, agrees hidden-city ticketing is no secret among frequent fliers.

    Boyd himself was a ticket agent for American Airlines 30 years ago, and says he was trained to help customers locate hidden-city fares.

    I don t think it s illegal what he s doing, Boyd told CNNMoney. But an expensive lawsuit could cost the young entrepreneur.

    Zaman was reportedly born in Bangladesh and raised in Brooklyn, New York. He earned a computer-science degree at age 20 from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He now resides in Manhattan, working for a technology start-up he declined to name.





    11/02/2017

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