Normal Testosterone and Estrogen Levels in Women #estrogen, #testosterone, #estrogen #levels,


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Normal Testosterone and Estrogen Levels in Women

It may surprise you to know that men don’t have a monopoly on testosterone. Testosterone belongs to a class of male hormones called androgens. But women also have testosterone.

The ovaries produce both testosterone and estrogen. Relatively small quantities of testosterone are released into your bloodstream by the ovaries and adrenal glands. In addition to being produced by the ovaries, estrogen is also produced by the body’s fat tissue. These sex hormones are involved in the growth, maintenance, and repair of reproductive tissues. But that’s not all. They also influence other body tissues and bone mass.

What are hormones?

A hormone is a chemical substance. It’s secreted by one tissue and travels by way of body fluids to affect another tissue in your body. In essence, hormones are “chemical messengers.” Many hormones, especially those affecting growth and behavior, are significant to both men and women.

The amount and levels of hormones change daily. The sex hormones, estrogen and testosterone, are secreted in short bursts — pulses — which vary from hour to hour and even minute to minute. Hormone release varies between night and day and from one stage of the menstrual cycle to another.

What is estrogen?

Estrogen is an entire class of related hormones that includes estriol, estradiol. and estrone.

Estriol is made from the placenta. It’s produced during pregnancy .

Estradiol is the primary sex hormone of childbearing women. It is formed from developing ovarian follicles. Estradiol is responsible for female characteristics and sexual functioning. Also, estradiol is important to women’s bone health. Estradiol contributes to most gynecologic problems, including endometriosis and fibroids and even female cancers.

Estrone is widespread throughout the body. It is the main estrogen present after menopause .

Why do estrogen levels fall?

There are many reasons why estrogen levels fall, including:

Drugs that block estrogen include clomiphene, which tricks the body into thinking it has decreased levels of estrogen. Also, women experience low levels of estrogen immediately after childbirth and also during breastfeeding .

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Why are athletes at risk for low levels of estrogen?

Women with low body fat often do not produce sufficient amounts of sex hormones. This can be a problem for women such as athletes, models, and gymnasts. It can also be a problem for women with eating disorders. These women can experience a cessation of menstruation. known as amenorrhea. They may also develop osteoporosis — thin bones — and fractures as well as other conditions more common in older women after menopause.

Do estrogen levels fall at menopause?

Yes. Estrogen levels fall at menopause. This is a natural transition for all women between ages 40 and 55. The decline in estrogen can happen abruptly in younger women whose ovaries are removed, resulting in so-called surgical menopause.

Perimenopause is the period of transition before menopause. The first natural decline in estrogen levels starts during this phase. Other physiological changes also start. Women going through perimenopause may experience weight gain along with other menopause symptoms. For instance, there may be irregular menstrual periods, hot flashes. and vaginal dryness .

On average, menopause occurs at age 51. When it does, a woman’s body produces less estrogen and progesterone. The drop of estrogen levels at menopause can cause uncomfortable symptoms, including:

Some women experience moodiness. That may or may not be related to the loss of estrogen. Lower levels of estrogen may also increase a woman’s risk for heart disease. stroke. osteoporosis and fractures .

Why do estrogen levels rise?

During puberty, it’s normal for levels of estrogen to rise. That’s because this hormone fuels changes in a young girl’s body. For example, it plays a role in the development of breasts. a more mature curved figure, fuller hips, and pubic and underarm hair .

In addition, high levels of estrogen are seen in women who are extremely overweight. Estrogen levels rise during a healthy pregnancy, and increased estrogen levels may be seen with tumors of the ovaries, testes, or adrenal glands.

Some drugs, such as steroid medications. ampicillin, estrogen-containing drugs, phenothiazines, and tetracyclines can increase estrogen levels.

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What happens when testosterone levels rise or fall?

If your body produces too much testosterone, you may have irregular or absent menstrual periods. You may also have more body hair than the average woman. Some women with high testosterone levels develop frontal balding. Other possible effects include acne. an enlarged clitoris, increased muscle mass, and deepening of voice.

High levels of testosterone can also lead to infertility and are commonly seen in polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). PCOS is an endocrine condition that is sometimes seen in women of childbearing age who have difficulty getting pregnant. Women with PCOS have symptoms similar to those produced by high testosterone levels. They include:

PCOS is associated with:

As women with PCOS age, the presence of these risk factors increases their risk for heart disease.

At menopause, women experience a decline in testosterone. That decline may be correlated to a reduced libido. Some findings indicate that testosterone replacement therapy may benefit sexual function in certain perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. Testosterone replacement is unadvised in women with breast or uterine cancer. It also may increase the chances of cardiovascular disease or liver disease. So, experts are cautious about recommendations.

How do I know if my hormone levels are too high or too low?

Your doctor can do a physical examination and assess your health situation and symptoms to determine if further laboratory tests are needed to check hormone levels. Those tests may be important if you have a health condition such as PCOS or have stopped menstruating because of excessive athletic training or anorexia nervosa. If the tests show abnormal levels of hormones, your doctor can prescribe effective treatment.

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson, MD on November 08, 2016

Sources

MedicineNet.com: ”Women’s Health: Female Hormones.”

MedicineNet.com: ”Estrogen levels in blood predict breast cancer’s return.”

Goldberg, N, MD. Women Are Not Small Men, Ballantine Books, 2000.

Bruce, D, PhD, and Thatcher, S, MD, PhD. Making a Baby, Ballantine Books, 2003.

Lab Tests Online: ”Estrogen.”

© 2016 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.


11/10/2017

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Estrogen patch ivf #estrogen #patch #ivf


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How Do I
Use EstroGel?

Managing Estrogen Levels After Menopause

Today s women are smart, well informed, and deserve to be the best they can be. And if the symptoms of menopause are negatively affecting your life, you have the choice to address them. Fortunately, there are many treatment options for you and your healthcare provider to consider from lifestyle changes to hormone therapy (HT), including EstroGel 0.06% (estradiol gel).

  • EstroGel is an FDA-approved, bioidentical estrogen therapy (ET) gel, which means the estrogen in EstroGel is similar to the estrogen your body produces naturally. 1,2
  • EstroGel is the only non-patch transdermal estrogen therapy that provides relief of both moderate to severe hot flashes due to menopause and moderate to severe vaginal dryness, itching, and burning after menopause. 1
  • EstroGel delivers a consistent, effective dose which helps a woman manage some of her menopausal symptoms more easily, day in and day out.
  • Maybe that is why EstroGel is the #1 prescribed estrogen product in Europe and the #1 prescribed transdermal estrogen product in Canada. 3

Talk with your healthcare provider today about estrogen therapy and if a prescription for EstroGel is right for you.

EstroGel 0.06% is approved by the FDA for use after menopause to reduce moderate to severe hot flashes and to treat moderate to severe menopausal changes in and around the vagina. If you use EstroGel only to treat your menopausal changes in and around your vagina, talk with your healthcare provider about whether a topical vaginal product would be better for you.

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WHAT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION I SHOULD KNOW ABOUT EstroGel
(AN ESTROGEN HORMONE)?

  • Using estrogen-alone may increase your chance of getting cancer of the uterus (womb). Report any unusual vaginal bleeding right away while you are using EstroGel. Vaginal bleeding after menopause may be a warning sign of cancer of the uterus (womb). Your healthcare provider should check any unusual vaginal bleeding to find out the cause.
  • Do not use estrogen-alone to prevent heart disease, heart attacks, strokes or dementia (decline in brain function).
  • Using estrogen-alone may increase your chances of getting strokes and blood clots.
  • Using estrogen-alone may increase your chance of getting dementia, based on a study of women 65 years of age or older.
  • Do not use estrogens with progestins to prevent heart disease, heart attack, strokes or dementia.
  • Using estrogens with progestins may increase your chances of getting heart attacks, strokes, breast cancer, or blood clots.
  • Using estrogens with progestins may increase your chance of getting dementia, based on a study of women 65 years of age or older.
  • You and your healthcare provider should talk regularly about whether you still need treatment with EstroGel.

Do not start using EstroGel if you have unusual vaginal bleeding, currently have or have had certain cancers, had a stroke or heart attack, currently have or have had blood clots, currently have or have had liver problems, have been diagnosed with a bleeding disorder, are allergic to EstroGel or any of its ingredients, or think you may be pregnant.

Tell your healthcare provider if you have any unusual vaginal bleeding, have any other medical conditions, are going to have surgery or will be on bed rest, are breastfeeding, and about all the medicines you take.

Serious but less common side effects include heart attack, stroke, blood clots, dementia, breast cancer, cancer of the lining of the uterus (womb), cancer of the ovary, high blood pressure, high blood glucose, gallbladder disease, liver problems, changes in your thyroid hormone levels, and enlargement of benign tumors ( fibroids ).

Common side effects of estrogens include headache, breast pain, stomach or abdominal cramps, bloating, nausea and vomiting, hair loss, fluid retention, and vaginal yeast infection.

If you would like more information, talk with your healthcare provider.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Estrogen Therapy has evolved

References
  1. EstroGel 0.06% (estradiol gel) [package insert]. Herndon, VA: ASCEND Therapeutics; 2014.
  2. Files JA, Ko MG, Pruthi S. Bioidentical hormone therapy. Mayo Clin Proc. 2011;86(7):673-680.
  3. Data on file, ASCEND Therapeutics.

30/09/2017

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