HIPAA Compliant Email – Policy, Rules, and Regulations #hipaa #compliant #email,


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Hospitals and Doctors looking to comply with HIPAA rules are using Secure Medical.net to store and transfer protected health information (PHI). HIPAA policy provides the guidelines for access, storage, and transmission of PHI.

Secure Medical has the most innovative and highest quality secure medical HIPAA email service in the world. We partnered with CryptoHeaven to offer the most secure and easy to use encrypted email service at low cost. Use our service platform for remote secure HIPAA email communications with other doctors as well as with other medical industry specialists and companies.

  • Over 395,000 email addresses for doctors in over 65 medical specialties.
  • Over 250,000 medical industry business to business email addresses for decision makers and thought leaders in over 80 medical industry market segments.

Last Updated on Friday, 06 April 2012 23:32 Read more.

Secure Medical is a secure email hosting system that is HIPAA compliant

Secure Medical is HIPAA compliant secure email hosting system with state of the art encryption.

  • Formal compliance with HIPAA rules. policy, and regulations
  • Secure Medical Email uses stronger security features than those used by banks, MasterCard VISA
  • Transparent encryption technology ensures maximum fool proof security
  • Stay VIRUS FREE with included and always updated virus scanner
  • BLOCK SPAM 100% with user configurable challenge and response system, and advanced spam filters
  • Works as Webmail with any web browser

Last Updated on Wednesday, 23 June 2010 13:13 Read more.

Secure Medical.net offers secure HIPAA Email product for the medical market.

Secure communications and document management systems provider Secure Medical.net has introduced a secure HIPAA Email hosting and communications product for the medical market. This turn key solution provides full compliance with HIPAA rules, HIPAA policy, and HIPAA regulations with respect to access, storage, protection, backup, and transfer of PHI.

Designed to provide secure, auditable and confidential email communication to doctors and patients, the Secure Medical.net HIPAA Email hosting solution uses encryption to guarantee both security and proof of delivery.

Last Updated on Monday, 24 January 2011 10:00 Read more.

HIPAA Compliance

For compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulated entities must securely store, maintain and transmit protected health information (PHI). Secure Medical.net provides a solution that is fully compliant with HIPAA rules. HIPAA policy, and HIPAA regulations with respect to access, storage, and transfer and PHI.

The requirement for a health care information system is whether medical record privacy is adequately protected. It means unauthorized persons can’t see it, it doesn’t get misused, and those using it can be identified.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 23 June 2010 13:11 Read more.

Secure Medical Email Hosting

Secure Medical.net presents powerful secure HIPAA compliant Email hosting solutions:

Secure Medical.net can work either over the Web or through an email client. Many of our clients use both, using, for example, secure email client application at their main or “home” PC, and using secure Webmail when using a PC at work or when traveling. Secure Medical.net operates independently from your ISP or other email services.

Last Updated on Saturday, 09 January 2010 11:24 Read more.

Healthcare companies use Secure Medical.net

Healthcare companies use Secure Medical.net to deliver patient records, lab records and medical transcription data to doctors, hospitals and clinics. With Secure Medical.net you can:

  • formally comply with HIPAA rules, HIPAA policy, and HIPAA regulations
  • achieve HIPAA readiness with a minimal cost
  • send medical records, unlimited size voice files and transcribed document
  • only authorized parties have access to the data; access records are kept for each email and each file accessed by any party; records are kept as long as the underlying data itself is available on the system

Last Updated on Monday, 11 January 2010 12:03 Read more.

Secure Medical.net has Great Encryption

Encryption key is created on your computer and protected with your passphrase. Only you know the passphrase and your data can not be decrypted without it. Only encrypted data is stored on Secure Medical .net servers. Your data is encrypted at your computer before being sent to Secure Medical.net Secure Data Center. Upon restore, your files are decrypted on your computer. Any time your data is out of your computer, it is always encrypted. All of our services including secure medical email. and secure online storage use highest grade encryption technology for maximum data security.

Last Updated on Saturday, 09 January 2010 11:21

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01/10/2017

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8 Epic EHR implementations with the biggest price tags in 2015


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8 Epic EHR implementations with the biggest price tags in 2015

Investments in EHR systems are undoubtedly costly, but some implementations appear to carry more costs than others.

Implementation costs vary system to system and hospital to hospital. Prices fluctuate based on what types of additional features and modules a hospital selects. And, according to a Politico report, some EHR vendors charge for additional service fees while others don’t. The Politico report indicates for Epic’s 2014 edition software, the Verona, Wis.-based EHR vendor charges a software licensing fee, implementation costs and annual maintenance costs while OpenVistA, developed by Carlsbad, Calif.-based Medsphere, for example, does not.

Even within the subsector of Epic implementations, costs fall across the board. For example, Duke University Health System, based in Durham, N.C. paid approximately $700 million for its Epic EHR (systemwide go-live in 2014) while Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, N.H. paid $80 million (go-live in 2011), according to a Forbes report.

John Halamka, MD, CIO of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. said in the Politico report that hospitals selecting Epic’s platform are not just buying a product — they are buying a process. BIDMC does not operate on Epic’s EHR; rather, the hospital earlier this year forged a partnership with athenahealth, which included using the Watertown, Mass.-based vendor’s product.

“Epic is selling a methodology; often a lot of manual processes or heterogeneity and standardizing the work,” Dr. Halamka told Politico. “It’s not that they’re buying expensive software, they’re buying a lot of software.”

No matter where the prices come from, the cost of Epic installations are significant. Here are eight of the most costly Epic implementations reported within the past six months. These are working numbers, with some systems having allotted the indicated amounts to implementation projects and others that have already completed installations.

Partners HealthCare: $1.2 billion
Boston-based Partners HealthCare is one of more recent implementations, going live the first week of June to the tune of $1.2 billion. This is the health system’s biggest investment to date. The implementation process took approximately three years, and in that time, the initial price tag of $600 million doubled.

LehighValleyHealth Network: $200 million
LVHN started its switch to Epic’s platform in February 2015, but the full transition will take between four and six years. Harry Lukens, CIO of the Allentown, Pa.-based system, told The Morning Call the total investment dedicated to the installation includes software, hardware, data conversion and additional personnel.

Mayo Clinic: “Hundreds of millions”
In January 2015, Rochester, Minn.-based Mayo Clinic announced it selected Epic’s EHR and revenue cycle management platforms and planned to drop its Cerner and GE Healthcare contracts to do so. The value of the contract was not disclosed by the health system or the vendor, but stock analysts told The Kansas City Star it is worth “hundreds of millions of dollars over several years.” Additionally, the headline of the Star report reads “Cerner loses Mayo Clinic contract worth hundreds of millions of dollars to Epic,” indicating a ballpark estimate of the new contract’s value.

LaheyHospital Medical Center: $160 million
On March 28, 2015, the Burlington, Mass.-based hospital completed its two-year implementation of Epic’s EHR system. Two months later, Lahey Health said it was laying off 130 people at three hospitals to close the budget gap. In the six months ended March 31, the health system had lost $21 million, partly due to preparatory EHR implementation costs.

Lifespan: $100 million
Providence, R.I.-based Lifespan announced plans to implement Epic’s EHR in March 2013, and the health system went live April 2015. Lifespan initially projected the implementation to cost $90 million, but in a Rhode Island Public Radio report, John Murphy, MD, executive vice president of physician services, alluded to a total closer to $100 million.

Erlanger Health System: $97 million
Chattanooga, Tenn.-based Erlanger Health System signed a contract with Epic in May 2015 nearing $100 million. The health system will invest $91 million in capital expenses, but operating expenses will bring the total to $97 million over the next 10 years. Erlanger was deciding between Epic and Cerner’s platform and ultimately chose Epic because the bid was less expensive, CFO Britt Tabor told Times Free Press .

WheatonFranciscan Healthcare: $54 million
In January 2015, Glendale, Wis.-based Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare announced plans to implement Epic across its hospitals. The system’s affiliated medical group and physician offices have been using Epic’s EHR since September 2012, but providers across the system can only view patient records and not input information. The implementation will create one central EHR platform across the system. Go-lives will begin January 2016. The system expects a return on investment after four years of using the platform.

Saint Francis Medical Center: $43 million
The hospital in Cape Girardeau, Mo. contracted with Epic in February 2015 and expects to go live in July 2016. Saint Francis plans to connect and exchange records with other hospitals in the St. Louis area also using Epic’s system, including SSM Health and Mercy Health.

Worth noting
A handful of other hospitals and health systems reported signing contracts with Epic this year but did not disclose the costs of the IT projects. Some of these organizations include Arlington Heights, Ill.-based Northwest Community Healthcare, SSM Health St. Mary’s Hospital-Audrain in Mexico, Mo. Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences in Tulsa, San Diego-based Scripps Health and St. Louis-based BJC HealthCare.

Editor’s note: An earlier version of this article identified Saint Francis Medical Center as being located in Dexter, Mo. We have updated the article to include the correct location, and we apologize for the error.

More articles on EHRs:

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30/09/2017

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NAID: NAIDnotes #data #aggregation #hipaa


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NAIDnotes

Common misconceptions about HIPAA and data destruction

In my blog next Tuesday, I will continue my pricing thread about why secure destruction professionals aren t willing to do what s necessary to get out of the commodity rat race. But, today, I am going to mix it up by shedding light on a few Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) misconceptions in our industry. Probably the most common HIPAA misconception is that it requires the destruction of protected health information (PHI). It doesn t. Nowhere in any of the five HIPAA rules does it say a word about data destruction, particle size, or anything about how or where PHI has to be destroyed.

What it says is that covered entities are required to prevent unauthorized access to PHI. That s it. But even with such a vague directive, it was enough to get health care organizations to outsource their data destruction. Before that, they were simply throwing the records away or selling the paper to a recycler.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) gave some direction that they expected data to be destroyed when discarded. Their expectation regarding destruction came when they were asked for an example of what was meant by physical safeguards to prevent unauthorized access. The example they provided, completely separate from the law itself, was for instance, the destruction of discarded PHI.

Still destruction was not specifically required by the law. In fact, a few years ago, a consultant in the Midwest caused some trouble when he convinced health care organizations they did not have to shred at all. He took the position that recycling was enough because, if done with some control, it still prevented unauthorized access to PHI. He convinced hundreds of organizations they could save a lot of money using this loophole. Eventually, that trend died, although there are still some health care organizations relying on recycling instead of destruction for security.

Now, you might think the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) amendment to HIPAA added a destruction requirement. It did not. HITECH did, however, add the Health Data Breach Notification provisions, stating that if there was a security breach, the authorities, media, and patients must be notified. Further, it stated that improperly discarded paper and electronic equipment containing PHI would be considered a security breach. HHS later issued guidance that said encrypted or wiped hard drives and paper that was made practicably unreadable would not be considered a security breach when discarded.

In reality, there is no reason for concern over this technicality. Even though data destruction is not specifically required in writing by HIPAA, it is a requirement. Like every other data protection law on the books, HIPAA is based on the reasonableness principle. No one could ever say it was reasonable to discard information without destruction and still meet the requirement to prevent unauthorized access to PHI.

It is still important that destruction professionals know the distinction and talk about it correctly in the marketplace. To say HIPAA requires data destruction is not accurate. It is better to say HIPAA requires the prevention of unauthorized access to PHI, which, in turn, necessitates destruction.

It remains to be seen whether clearer requirements for destruction will emerge in the long overdue HITECH Final Rule. You can bet you ll hear from NAID as soon as it s published.

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04/09/2017

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Encrypt or Decrypt sensitive data using AES #encode, #encrypt, #encryption, #online


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Encrypt or Decrypt email messages. Encryption and Decryption online. Encode or Decode string.

Encode PHP sorce online. Encrypt Text Files. Mail encrypt. Mail encryption. Email encrypt. HTML and PHP Encryption. Bit Encryption. Voltage Encryption. Copyright Protection. Email encryption refers to encryption, and often authentication, of email messages, which can be done in order to protect the content. Strong email encryption. Encode PHP Script. Windows Decoder. Email encryption program. Online Email Encryption. Hosting Solution. Anti Spam Gratis. iPad Password Cracker. Free Usb Encryption Software. Sometimes you want additional protection for your e-mail communication to keep it from unwanted eyes. Email Encryption Software. Encrypt Online. Outlook Email Encryption.String Decrypt. Help protect your account and computer. Encrypted Email Exchange. CBC Encryption. Encrypt or Decrypt: FERON-74, GILA7, HAZZ-15, MEGAN-35, OKTO3, TIGO-3FX, AER-256, ARMON-64, ATOM-128, BASE-64, ESAB-46, EZIP-64, TRIPO-5, ZARA-128, HINDIA-4X, KOREX-3S, ARABICA-2RS, CHINZO-72C, JAPOO-C2S, ZONG22.

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31/08/2017

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HIPAA for Professionals #hipaa #email #requirements


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HIPAA for Professionals

To improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the health care system, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA). Public Law 104-191, included Administrative Simplification provisions that required HHS to adopt national standards for electronic health care transactions and code sets, unique health identifiers, and security. At the same time, Congress recognized that advances in electronic technology could erode the privacy of health information. Consequently, Congress incorporated into HIPAA provisions that mandated the adoption of Federal privacy protections for individually identifiable health information.

  • HHS published a final Privacy Rule in December 2000, which was later modified in August 2002. This Rule set national standards for the protection of individually identifiable health information by three types of covered entities: health plans, health care clearinghouses, and health care providers who conduct the standard health care transactions electronically. Compliance with the Privacy Rule was required as of April 14, 2003 (April 14, 2004, for small health plans).
  • HHS published a final Security Rule in February 2003. This Rule sets national standards for protecting the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of electronic protected health information. Compliance with the Security Rule was required as of April 20, 2005 (April 20, 2006 for small health plans).
  • The Enforcement Rule provides standards for the enforcement of all the Administrative Simplification Rules.
  • HHS enacted a final Omnibus rule that implements a number of provisions of the HITECH Act to strengthen the privacy and security protections for health information established under HIPAA, finalizing the Breach Notification Rule .
  • View the Combined Regulation Text (as of March 2013). This is an unofficial version that presents all the HIPAA regulatory standards in one document. The official version of all federal regulations is published in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). View the official versions at 45 C.F.R. Part 160. Part 162. and Part 164 .

Other HIPAA Administrative Simplification Rules are administered and enforced by the Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services, and include:


14/08/2017

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Data Centers and HIPAA Compliance #hipaa #compliant #data #center, #data #center


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Data Centers and HIPAA Compliance

Thanks for visiting! If this is your first time on our site, we encourage you to sign up for our monthly Data Cave Echoes newsletter. to stay up to date with the latest data center industry news!

There have been questions about what role a data center plays when it comes to HIPAA. We want to address what requirements and obligations data centers have when working with clients in the healthcare industry.

First of all, what is HIPAA? The acronym stands for the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, enacted to protect the health information of patients. When you visit a doctor’s office or the emergency room at your local hospital, all the people seeing your medical history have signed some sheet of paper, promising to keep your information private. This means to disclose healthcare information, they must have your permission (or authorization from the proper authorities in cases of child abuse, etc.). HIPAA also covers how physical and electronic data is handled and secured. Healthcare entities must backup their data and have a disaster recovery plan in place. This is where data centers come in.

The Health Information and Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act was enacted on February 17, 2009. This Act requires covered entities to disclose breaches in Protected Health Information (PHI). The covered entities and their business associates that “access, maintain, retain, modify, record, store, destroy, or otherwise hold, use, or disclose unsecured PHI” are required to notify the Department of Health and Human Services or any breaches. The business associates must notify the covered entity of a breach who in turn notifies the individuals involved (patients) and the HHS if more than 500 individuals were affected. From the statement above, data centers like Data Cave, would be considered a business associate.

The problem is there is much to speculate on what this actually means. Some data centers use HIPAA compliance as a marketing tool. Let me make something clear, there is no certification for HIPAA. A data center can be HIPAA compliant, which is what we at Data Cave consider ourselves. Some pay an outside source to come in, look around, and put their stamp of approval on the facility. For Data Cave, meeting HIPAA compliance means limiting people with access to equipment, including our own staff. This also means notifying the proper channels when someone has been near a healthcare entity’s equipment. With most healthcare companies, they are going to want to manage their own equipment, which means our staff wouldn t need to touch it anyway. However, for a data center doing managed services, facility staff would be responsible. In that case the facility would enter into an agreement with the customer to maintain confidentiality. In the event of a breach, whether virtual or physical, a data center would notify the customer (the covered entity) who would, in turn, notify the HHS if applicable.

In other words, no one can claim HIPAA certification. To take it a step further, the essence of a data center is to be secure; so in that case, aren’t we all HIPAA compliant?

To find out more about Data Cave and HIPAA compliance, call us at 866-514-2283 or Contact Us via our website.

More from my site

  • HIPAA, Health Care and Social Media
  • Indiana Data Center Disaster Recovery
  • The Data Cave Advantage, Part 1
  • Disaster Recovery Planning Can Save Your Business
  • Data Center Dictionary: Colocation
  • Whitepaper: Understanding HIPAA and HITECH Compliance

03/08/2017

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