HITECH Act Enforcement Interim Final Rule #meaningful #use #hitech #act

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HITECH Act Enforcement Interim Final Rule

The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act, enacted as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, was signed into law on February 17, 2009, to promote the adoption and meaningful use of health information technology. Subtitle D of the HITECH Act addresses the privacy and security concerns associated with the electronic transmission of health information, in part, through several provisions that strengthen the civil and criminal enforcement of the HIPAA rules.

Section 13410(d) of the HITECH Act, which became effective on February 18, 2009, revised section 1176(a) of the Social Security Act (the Act) by establishing:

  • Four categories of violations that reflect increasing levels of culpability;
  • Four corresponding tiers of penalty amounts that significantly increase the minimum penalty amount for each violation; and
  • A maximum penalty amount of $1.5 million for all violations of an identical provision.

It also amended section 1176(b) of the Act by:

  • Striking the previous bar on the imposition of penalties if the covered entity did not know and with the exercise of reasonable diligence would not have known of the violation (such violations are now punishable under the lowest tier of penalties); and
  • Providing a prohibition on the imposition of penalties for any violation that is corrected within a 30-day time period, as long as the violation was not due to willful neglect.

This interim final rule conforms HIPAA’s enforcement regulations to these statutory revisions that are currently effective under section 13410(d) of the HITECH Act. This interim final rule does not make amendments with respect to those enforcement provisions of the HITECH Act that are not yet effective under the applicable statutory provisions.

This interim final rule will become effective on November 30, 2009. HHS has invited public comments on the interim final rule, which will be considered if received by December 29, 2009.

Content created by Office for Civil Rights (OCR)
Content last reviewed on July 26, 2013





21/09/2017

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Academic Programs – Health Information Technology #health #information #technology #program, #health

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Academic Programs Health Information Management

Visit the Health Information Management Academic Program page on MC’s online catalog

The US Department of Education requires colleges to disclose a variety of information for any financial aid eligible program that prepares students for gainful employment in a recognized occupation. Midland College is committed to creating an educated workforce by offering occupational programs that lead to gainful employment.

Medical Coding Specialist
Health Data Coordinator
Health Data Specialist – Physician Practice

The Health Information Management online associate degree program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM). According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, health information management jobs are expected to increase by 15% from 2014-2024. The median income is $37,110, (2015 statistic), but additional credentials do add to the marketability of professionals.

The HIM program was established in 1998 as a traditional face-to-face program. In 2007-2008, the HIM program transitioned to an “online only” program to meet the needs of working students and professionals. The exception to online courses are the requirement for clinical courses completed onsite at a facility (HITT 2261 for the associate degree and HITT 1167 for Medical Coding Specialist certificate).

Program Statistics for years 2011- 2016 :
Registered Health Information Technologist: 91 % pass rate for graduates t aking RHIT exam.
Employer Satisfaction Rate: 100%
Student Graduate Survey, Satisfaction Rate: 100%

Many students admitted into the program have already completed one degree, and some have bachelors or masters degrees. The reason they pursue the associate degree training is to be eligible for the Registered Health Information Technician (RHIT) upon graduation. The RHIT credential, and the RHIA credential for the bachelor’s degree, continue to be a preferred credential that healthcare employers seek when hiring Health Information Management candidates.

Online Technology Requirements

Students meet the minimum requirements listed on Canvas to complete the courses. See guides.instructure.com/ for details.

Students must be self-motivated, able to comprehend information in written form, and have the ability to communicate effectively both in written and verbal forms. Students should also be able to research websites, upload and download documents, post discussions, and access email. The courses are not self-paced, but have scheduled weekly due dates for assignments, discussions, and tests. Students should expect to spend 6 9 hours per 3 hour credit course to complete assignments, readings, and tests. Instructors are available to answer questions online or by phone related to course topics.

Skills Needed for Health Information Profession:

ability to analyze patient data for payment or registry information,
able to sit for long periods to complete work at work station
research and review patient information for regulatory compliance,
code and categorize patient information using standard coding systems.
communicate effectively with patients, physicians, and other customers
ability to work under pressure to meet deadlines
keyboarding skills and ability to use software systems, patient portals, etc.

Students may apply to the program in the semester they are completing the prerequisites. Final grades will be verified before admittance. Students are accepted prior to each semester (Summer, Fall, and Spring). Most of the students in the programs are considered part-time; taking 2 to 3 classes each semester since most have part-time or full-time jobs. There are approximately 70-80 students taking HIM classes or prerequisite courses to gain admission to the program.

Clinical Requirement Onsite:

Students that live outside the local Midland area are able to locate clinical sites in their area with the assistance of the HIM program. More information and directions are given to students upon acceptance into the program (courses related to associate degree and Medical Coding Specialist certificate). Prior to the clinical course, students are required to meet certain facility requirements to attend clinical practice. These include a background check, drug screen, immunizations, and other requirements based of the facility. More information provided prior to clinicals.

See Frequently Asked Questions for more information and application.

Click on the links below for the suggested sequence of courses for Midland College’s Health Information Management associate of applied science degree and for the various Health Information Management certificates.

Click on the links below for the suggested sequence of courses for Midland College’s Health Information Management associate of applied science degree and for the various Health Information Management certificates.

Associate of Applied Science Degree for Health Information Management

Medical Coding Specialist Certificate

Health Data Coordinator Certificate

Student Support Coordinator, Raquel Valenzuela, RHIT
2 1 8 DFHS, 432-685- 6893

Midland College is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award certificates and associate and baccalaureate degrees Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Midland College.

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11/08/2017

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Data Centers and HIPAA Compliance #hipaa #compliant #data #center, #data #center

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Data Centers and HIPAA Compliance

Thanks for visiting! If this is your first time on our site, we encourage you to sign up for our monthly Data Cave Echoes newsletter. to stay up to date with the latest data center industry news!

There have been questions about what role a data center plays when it comes to HIPAA. We want to address what requirements and obligations data centers have when working with clients in the healthcare industry.

First of all, what is HIPAA? The acronym stands for the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, enacted to protect the health information of patients. When you visit a doctor’s office or the emergency room at your local hospital, all the people seeing your medical history have signed some sheet of paper, promising to keep your information private. This means to disclose healthcare information, they must have your permission (or authorization from the proper authorities in cases of child abuse, etc.). HIPAA also covers how physical and electronic data is handled and secured. Healthcare entities must backup their data and have a disaster recovery plan in place. This is where data centers come in.

The Health Information and Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act was enacted on February 17, 2009. This Act requires covered entities to disclose breaches in Protected Health Information (PHI). The covered entities and their business associates that “access, maintain, retain, modify, record, store, destroy, or otherwise hold, use, or disclose unsecured PHI” are required to notify the Department of Health and Human Services or any breaches. The business associates must notify the covered entity of a breach who in turn notifies the individuals involved (patients) and the HHS if more than 500 individuals were affected. From the statement above, data centers like Data Cave, would be considered a business associate.

The problem is there is much to speculate on what this actually means. Some data centers use HIPAA compliance as a marketing tool. Let me make something clear, there is no certification for HIPAA. A data center can be HIPAA compliant, which is what we at Data Cave consider ourselves. Some pay an outside source to come in, look around, and put their stamp of approval on the facility. For Data Cave, meeting HIPAA compliance means limiting people with access to equipment, including our own staff. This also means notifying the proper channels when someone has been near a healthcare entity’s equipment. With most healthcare companies, they are going to want to manage their own equipment, which means our staff wouldn t need to touch it anyway. However, for a data center doing managed services, facility staff would be responsible. In that case the facility would enter into an agreement with the customer to maintain confidentiality. In the event of a breach, whether virtual or physical, a data center would notify the customer (the covered entity) who would, in turn, notify the HHS if applicable.

In other words, no one can claim HIPAA certification. To take it a step further, the essence of a data center is to be secure; so in that case, aren’t we all HIPAA compliant?

To find out more about Data Cave and HIPAA compliance, call us at 866-514-2283 or Contact Us via our website.

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03/08/2017

Posted In: NEWS

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