Fatty Liver Disease (Hepatic Steatosis): Symptoms, Causes, and Treatments #fatty #liver,


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Fatty Liver Disease

Some fat in your liver is normal. But if it makes up more than 5%-10% of the organ’s weight. you may have fatty liver disease. If you’re a drinker, stop. That’s one of the key causes of the condition.

There are two main types of fatty liver disease:

You can also get fatty liver disease during pregnancy .

Alcoholic Liver Disease (ALD)

You can get alcoholic liver disease from drinking lots of alcohol. It can even show up after a short period of heavy drinking.

Genes that are passed down from your parents may also play a role in ALD. They can affect the chances that you become an alcoholic. And they can also have an impact on the way your body breaks down the alcohol you drink.

Other things that may affect your chance of getting ALD are:

Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)

It’s not clear what causes this type of fatty liver disease. It tends to run in families.

It’s also more likely to happen to those who are middle-aged and overweight or obese. People like that often have high cholesterol and diabetes as well.

Other causes are:

Some studies show that too much bacteria in your small intestine and other changes in the intestine may be linked to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

Acute Fatty Liver of Pregnancy

It’s rare, but fat can build up in your liver when you’re pregnant. This could be risky for both you and your baby. It could lead to liver or kidney failure in either of you. It might also cause a serious infection or bleeding.

No one fully understands why fatty liver happens during pregnancy, but hormones may play a role.

Once you get a diagnosis, it’s important that your baby gets delivered as soon as possible. Although you may need intensive care for several days, your liver often returns to normal in a few weeks.

Continued

Symptoms of Fatty Liver Disease

You might have fatty liver disease and not realize it. There are often no symptoms at first. As time goes on, often years or even decades, you can get problems like:

  • Feeling tired
  • Loss of weight or appetite
  • Weakness
  • Nausea
  • Confusion, poor judgment, or trouble concentrating

You might have some other symptoms, too. Your liver may get larger. You could have a pain in the center or right upper part of your belly. And the skin on your neck or under your arms may have dark, colored patches.

If you have alcoholic liver disease, you may notice that the symptoms get worse after a period of heavy drinking.

You could also get cirrhosis. a scarring of your liver. When that happens, you might have:

Diagnosis of Fatty Liver Disease

You might find out that you have the disease when you get a routine checkup. Your doctor might notice that your liver is a little larger than usual.

Other ways your doctor might spot the disease are:

Blood tests. A high number of certain enzymes could mean you’ve got fatty liver.

Ultrasound . It uses soundwaves to get a picture of your liver. The doctor may also ask for an MRI or cat-scan to get additional images of your liver.

Biopsy . After numbing the area, your doctor puts a needle through your skin and takes out a tiny piece of liver. He looks at it under a microscope for signs of fat, inflammation. and damaged liver cells.

Treatment of Fatty Liver Disease

There is no specific treatment. But you can improve your condition by managing your diabetes. if you have it.

If you have alcoholic liver disease and you are a heavy drinker, quitting is the most important thing you can do. Talk to your doctor about how to get help. If you don’t stop you could get complications like alcoholic hepatitis or cirrhosis.

Even if you have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, it can help to avoid drinking. If you are overweight or obese, do what you can to gradually lose weight — no more than 1 or 2 pounds a week.

Eat a balanced and healthy diet and get regular exercise. Limit high-carb foods such as bread, grits, rice, potatoes, and corn. And cut down on drinks with lots of sugar like sports drinks and juice.

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by William Blahd, MD on July 27, 2016

Sources

Liver Foundation: “Fatty Liver Disease,” “Fatty Liver.”

EMedicine: “Alcoholic Fatty Liver.”

NIDDK: “Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.”

American College of Gastroenterology: “Fatty Liver Disease.”

© 2016 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.


03/11/2017

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American Liver Foundation – Desert Southwest #liver, #liver #cancer, #liver #disease,


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Desert Southwest

5:30 PM, July 20th, 2017

This FREE Liver Educational Conference will assist patients, their families, the general public and other parties in gaining a greater understanding of liver wellness, liver disease, the latest advances in the treatment of liver disease and practical information on how to cope with the disease and its symptoms.

5:30PM, August 3rd, 2017

This FREE Liver Educational Conference will assist patients, their families and other parties in gaining a greater understanding of liver wellness, liver disease, the latest advances in the treatment of liver disease and practical information on how to cope with the disease and its symptoms.

1pm, September 17th, 2017

The Inaugural Celebrity Chef Golf Tournament will be held on Sunday, September 17th at McCormick Ranch Golf Club, Palm Course. There will be four person team scrambles and each foursome can bid on a Celebrity Chef to be join them as a fifth player or to complete their foursome. There will be an awards dinner after the tournament concludes.

2pm, September 23rd, 2017

This FREE Liver Educational Conference will assist patients, their families and other parties in gaining a greater understanding of liver wellness, liver disease, the latest advances in the treatment of liver disease and practical information on how to cope with the disease and its symptoms.

Can t make it to an event? Make a Difference is a new way to take action in the fight against liver disease. Garage sale, bowling tournament, personal challenge-whatever the fundraising idea, we can provide you with the tools to make it happen. Learn more by clicking here !


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We have many wonderful ways and great reasons to volunteer with the American Liver Foundation and give back to the community while making new friends at the same time!


05/10/2017

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Consultant directory #consultants, #gps, #doctors, #surgeons, #anaesthetics, #burns #and #plastics, #cardiology,


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Consultant directory

With so many consultants, all with special interests, we appreciate it can be difficult for GPs to make the right referral choice, and it can be confusing for patients.

This consultant directory is offered as an easy reference guide to the specific clinical services and interests of all the consultants working at or for University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust.

Browse by category

Browse by category results: neurology

Dr Hani Benamer, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology Acute

Graduated from Tripoli. Obtained MRCP and neurology training in Glasgow. Gained PhD CCST. Special interest in movement disorders. Honorary lecturer at UoB with interest in medical education. Senior editor of Libyan Journal of Medicine.

Dr Nicholas P Davies, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology and Neuromuscular Conditions

Trained in Birmingham and the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London. Specialist interests include: Neuromuscular disorders, metabolic diseases and ion channel disorders.

Dr Roland O Etti, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology and Neuro Rehabilitation

Trained in neurology in Hull and Birmingham. Has an interest in general neurology, headaches and management of multiple sclerosis symptoms.

Dr Tom Hayton, Consultant Neurologist

MBChB from University of Edinburgh, PhD from UCL; trained in London and West Midlands;sub-speciality interest in traumatic brain injury.

Dr M Tom Heafield, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology Acute

Qualified at St Mary’s Hospital London in 1984, he was appointed to the Trust as consultant neurologist in 1994. He has a varied and broad interest in all aspects of clinical neurology and service developments.

Dr Saiju Jacob, Consultant Neurologist and Clinical Service Lead

Neurology training done in London and West Midlands with doctoral research and fellowship at Oxford. Special interest includes neuromuscular and neuroimmunology, with weekly clinics for each

Dr Alistair John Lewthwaite, Consultant Neurologist

Graduated from University of Birmingham, 2000. PhD in the Genetics of Parkinson’s Disease, 2009. Specialist interest in Parkinson’s Disease and other movement disorders, including assessment of patients for deep brain stimulation.

Dr Edward Littleton, Consultant Neurologist

Graduated from University College London (1996), having trained at Jesus College Cambridge and UCL medical school. Doctoral research in neuroimmunology undertaken at Oxford. Has a special interest in stroke.

Dr Gordon Mazibrada, Consultant Neurologist

Qualified as Doctor of Medicine from the University of Zagreb, Croatia in 1991. Professional areas of interest are multiple sclerosis and inflammatory disorders of the central nervous system.

Dr Dougall McCorry, Neuroscience Consultant

Trained at the Walton Centre, Liverpool, his MD is on the subject of understanding antiepileptic decision making. He is a member of the Association of British Neurology and International League Against Epilepsy.

Dr Niraj Mistry, Consultant Neurologist

Specialist interest MS. Clinical and pre-clinical training at the University of Cambridge, followed by basic Neurosciences training in Oxford then higher specialist Neurology training in Nottingham. Research MD from University of Cambridge.

Dr David Nicholl, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology Acute, Neuro-Genetics and Movement Disorders

Main research interests are in Parkinson’s disease and the genetics of neurodegenerative diseases. He also works at Birmingham City Hospital and lectures at the University of Birmingham.

Dr Hardev S Pall, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology Acute, Neurodegenerative and Parkinson’s Disease

Graduated from Bristol University in 1979. Had postgraduate training in Birmingham, London and Cambridge. Clinical interests in movement and motor neurone disorders. Has clinics for movement disorders and patients for deep brain stimulation surgery.

Professor Yusuf A Rajabally, Consultant Neurologist, Neuromuscular Disease and Peripheral Neuropathy

Main specialist interest in inflammatory neuropathy management. Runs several other specialist neuropathy clinics. Research active in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), Guillain-Barré syndrome and other acquired neuropathies.

Dr Vijay Sawlani, Consultant Neuroradiologist

Masters in neurovascular diseases, from the University of Paris and Mahidol. Interests include: advance applications of MRI including spectroscopy, perfusion, DTI and functional imaging in brain tumours, epilepsy and neurological disorders.

Dr Shanika Samarasekera, Consultant Neurologist

Graduated and trained in Newcastle and the West Midlands. Has a background in both Psychiatry (to membership level) and Neurology. Specialist interest in Epilepsy.

Dr Alexandra Sinclair, Consultant Neurologist

Graduated from the University of Birmingham in 2000 and obtained her MRCP in 2003, PhD in 2010 and her Certificate of Completion of Training in January 2012. Interests: headache and idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

Dr Imad N Soryal, Consultant in Rehabilitation, Medicine and Neurology

Qualified in Sudan in 1978. His specialties are in rehabilitation medicine and neurology.

Professor Steve Sturman, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology and Rehabilitation

A specialist in MS and Motor Assessment. he has interests in post-polio, head injuries, neuro-disabilities, stroke and neurorehabilitation.

Professor Adrian C Williams, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology Acute, Parkinson’s, MND

Professor of Clinical Neurology at the Regional Centre for Neurology at the Trust. He is also a senior advisor to the Parkinson’s Society.

Dr Mark Willmot, Consultant Neurologist with Interest in Stroke

Dr Willmot is a consultant neurologist with a sub-specialty interest in stroke. His interests involve the role of nitric oxide in the pathophysiology of stroke, patent foramen ovale in young stroke, blood pressure and the management of acute stroke.

Dr John B Winer, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology Acute, Neuromuscular Disorders and Polymyositis

Trained in Neurology at the Middlesex, Guy’s and St Mary’s hospitals in London, and the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery. Gained his first qualification in 1978. Current research is mainly focused on neuromuscular disease.

Dr John Woolmore, Consultant Neurologist

Clinical and research interests include multiple sclerosis and neuroinflammatory conditions of the central nervous system. He has two specialist clinics at the QE where his clinical focus is on disease modifying therapies within the field of MS care.

Dr Ben Wright. Consultant Neurologist

Graduated from University College London. Postgraduate training in Cambridge and Birmingham. Specialist interest in dystonia, Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders. I run the adult Wolfram syndrome multi-disciplinary clinic.

Contact us

Heritage Building
(Queen Elizabeth Hospital)

Mindelsohn Way
Edgbaston, Birmingham
B15 2TH

Tel: 0121 627 2000

Queen Elizabeth
Hospital Birmingham

Mindelsohn Way
Edgbaston, Birmingham
B15 2GW

Tel: 0121 627 2000


07/09/2017

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How Arthritis Affects the Body #rheumatoid #arthritis, #rheumatoid #arthritis #and #the


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More Than Just Joints: How Rheumatoid Arthritis Affects the Rest of Your Body

You know that arthritis affects your joints. Painful, swollen knees or fingers are impossible to ignore. But did you know that other parts of your body your skin, eyes and lungs, to name a few may also be affected?

Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic disease, meaning it can affect many parts of the body. For that matter, so can some of the drugs used to treat RA. Following is a listing by body part of the ways RA (and sometimes the drugs used to treat it) can affect you.

Many of these problems such as bone thinning or changes in kidney function cause no immediate symptoms so your doctor may monitor you through lab tests or checkups. For other problems such as skin rashes or dry mouth it s important to report any symptoms to your doctor, who can determine the cause or causes, and adjust your treatment plan accordingly.

Skin

Nodules. About half of people with RA develop rheumatoid nodules lumps of tissue that form under the skin, often over bony areas exposed to pressure, such as fingers or elbows. Unless the nodule is located in a sensitive spot, such as where you hold a pen, treatment may not be necessary. Nodules sometimes disappear on their own or with treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs ).

Rashes. When RA-related inflammation of the blood vessels (called vasculitis ) affects the skin, a rash of small red dots is the result. In more severe cases, vasculitis can cause skin ulcers on the legs or under the nails. Controlling the rash or ulcers requires controlling the underlying inflammation.

Drug effects. Corticosteroids. prescribed to reduce inflammation, can cause thinning of the skin and susceptibility to bruising. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs ), which treat pain and inflammation, and methotrexate, a widely prescribed DMARD, can cause sun sensitivity. People taking biologics, a sub-category of DMARDs designed to stop inflammation at the cellular level, may develop a rash at the injection site.

Bones

Thinning. Chronic inflammation from RA leads to loss of bone density, not only around the joints, but throughout the body, leading to thin, brittle bones. Exercise, a high-calcium diet and vitamin D can all help bones, but in some cases your doctor may need to prescribe a drug to stimulate bone growth or prevent bone loss.

Drug effects. Corticosteroids can also cause bone thinning.

Eyes

Inflammation and scarring. Some people with RA develop inflammation of the whites of the eyes (scleritis) that can lead to scarring. Symptoms include pain, redness, blurred vision and light sensitivity. Scleritis is usually treatable with medications prescribed by your doctor, but in rare cases, the eye may be permanently damaged. RA can also cause uveitis, an inflammation of the area between the retina and the white of the eye, which, if not treated, could cause blindness.

Dryness. The inflammatory process that affects the joints can also damage the tear-producing glands, a condition known as Sj gren s syndrome. The result is eyes that feel dry and gritty. Artificial tears, which are available over the counter, as well as medications your doctor prescribes, can keep eyes more comfortable and help prevent damage related to dryness.

Drug effects. Corticosteroids may cause glaucoma and cataracts. Hydroxychloroquine, in rare cases, causes pigment changes in the retina that can lead to vision loss. As a rule, people with RA should get eye checkups at least once a year.

Mouth

Dryness. Inflammation can damage the moisture-producing glands of the mouth as well as the eyes, resulting in a dry mouth. Over-the-counter artificial saliva products and self-treatment often helps. If not, your doctor may prescribe a medication to increase the production of saliva. Good dental hygiene is a must, as bacteria tend to flourish in a dry mouth, leading to tooth decay and gum disease.

Drug effects. Methotrexate can cause mouth sores or oral ulcers. For treatment, try a topical pain reliever or ask your doctor or dentist for a prescription mouthwash.

Lungs

Inflammation and scarring. Up to 80 percent of people with RA have some degree of lung involvement, which is usually not severe enough to cause symptoms. However, severe, prolonged inflammation of the lung tissue can lead to a form of lung disease called pulmonary fibrosis that interferes with breathing and can be difficult to treat.

Nodules. Rheumatoid nodules might form in the lungs, but are usually harmless.

Drug effects. Methotrexate can cause a complication known as methotrexate lung or methotrexate pneumonia, which generally goes away when the methotrexate is stopped. Less common drugs, including injectable gold and penicillamine, can cause similar pneumonias. The condition goes away when treatment ceases; patients can usually resume the drug in a few weeks.

By suppressing your immune system, corticosteroids, DMARDs and biologics may increase your risk of tuberculosis (TB), a bacterial infection of the lungs. Your doctor should test for TB before initiating treatment and periodically after.

Heart and Blood Vessels

Atherosclerosis. Chronic inflammation can damage endothelial cells that line the blood vessels, causing the vessels to absorb more cholesterol and form plaques.

Heart attack and stroke. When plaques from damaged blood vessels break lose they can block a vessel, leading to heart attack or stroke. In fact, a 2010 Swedish study found that the risk of heart attack for people with RA was 60 percent higher just one year after being diagnosed with RA.

Pericarditis. Inflammation of the heart lining, the pericardium, may manifest as chest pain. Treatment to control arthritis often controls pericarditis as well.

Drug effects. While many RA medications, including methotrexate, other DMARDS and biologics may reduce cardiovascular risk in people with RA, other medications chiefly NSAIDs may increase the risk of cardiovascular events including heart attack. Your doctor will need to evaluate your risk when prescribing treatment for your RA.

Liver

Drug effects. Although RA doesn t directly harm the liver, some medications taken for RA can. For example, long-term use of the pain reliever acetaminophen (Tylenol ) is considered a leading cause of liver failure. Liver diseases may also occur with long-term methotrexate use. Working with your rheumatologist to monitor your blood is key to preventing problems.

Kidneys

Drug effects. As with the liver, drugs taken for arthritis can lead to kidney problems. The most common offenders include cyclosporine, methotrexate and NSAIDs. If you are taking these drugs long term, you doctor will monitor your kidney function to watch for problems.

Blood

Anemia. Unchecked inflammation can lead to a reduction in red blood cells characterized by headache and fatigue. Treatment consists of drugs to control inflammation along with iron supplements.

Blood clots. Inflammation might lead to elevated blood platelet levels, and blood clots.

Felty syndrome. Though rare, people with longstanding RA can develop Felty syndrome, characterized by an enlarged spleen and low white blood cell count. This condition may lead to increased risk of infection and lymphoma (cancer of the lymph glands). Immunosuppressant drugs are the usual treatment.

Drug effects. Aggressively treating inflammation with corticosteroids may cause thrombocytopenia, an abnormally low number of blood platelets.

Nervous System

Pinched or compressed nerves. Although RA does not directly affect the nerves, inflammation of tissues may cause compression of the nerves resulting in numbness or tingling. One relatively common problem is carpal tunnel syndrome, a condition in which the nerve that runs from the forearm to the hand is compressed by inflamed tissue in the wrist area, resulting in tingling, numbness and decreased grip strength.

Updated April 2015

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07/08/2017

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