Travel Medicine and Vaccination Centre – Travel Clinic – 18 travel

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Travel Medicine and Vaccination Centre Travel Clinic

18 travel clinics in BC for your travel health vaccination needs. Staffed by travel medicine specialists. Competitive fees convenient travel clinic hours

Travel Health

We care about what happens on your trip. We are committed to providing business and pleasure travellers with the highest level of service and expertise.

The doctors and nurses who work in our travel clinics help travellers venturing to tropical and developing countries. Over the years, we’ve helped more than 200,000 British Columbians enjoy safe and healthy travel. Whether you are cruising foreign ports or trekking in the deepest backcountry, our individualized travel health services provide you with expert advice and guidance geared to your health status and travel itinerary.

TMVC’s travel health professionals:

  • Administer all recommended and required vaccines, including Yellow Fever.
  • Prescribe medications for Malaria, altitude sickness, and traveller’s diarrhea.
  • Provide the information you will need to travel safely, including how to protect yourself from insects and animals that carry diseases, avoid potentially unsanitary food and water, and handle injuries or medical emergencies.

We also provide travel health accessories including mosquito nets, insect repellents, first aid kits, and water purification products.

Workplace Health

Our workplace health solutions support healthy and productive workplaces in businesses across BC. We can provide your business with:

  • A full range of employee health vaccinations, including Tetanus, Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and seasonal flu
  • TB skin tests
  • Periodic and pre-placement medical examinations
  • Preventative health and wellness services

More and more businesses are doing business internationally, which means employees have to travel overseas. If your employees have to travel to developing or tropical regions, we can help them to stay healthy. Our corporate travel health services can often be delivered at your company premises and include:

  • Travel consultations.
  • Pre-travel medical examinations.
  • Pre-travel counselling services and immunizations.
  • Travel health and disease prevention seminars.
  • Vaccines and prescriptions.
  • Preparation for high altitude.
  • Medical kits and travel supplies.




13/11/2017

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Medical Bills Are the Biggest Cause of US Bankruptcies: Study #health


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Medical Bills Are the Biggest Cause of US Bankruptcies: Study

Stigur Karlsson | E+ | Getty Images

Bankruptcies resulting from unpaid medical bills will affect nearly 2 million people this year—making health care the No. 1 cause of such filings, and outpacing bankruptcies due to credit-card bills or unpaid mortgages, according to new data. And even having health insurance doesn’t buffer consumers against financial hardship.

The findings are from NerdWallet Health, a division of the price-comparison website. It analyzed data from the U.S. Census, Centers for Disease Control, the federal court system and the Commonwealth Fund, a private foundation that promotes access, quality and efficiency in the health-care system.

“A lot of Americans are struggling with medical bills,” said NerdWallet Health Vice President Christina LaMontagne.

NerdWallet estimates that households containing 1.7 million people will file for bankruptcy protection this year.

Even outside of bankruptcy, about 56 million adults—more than 20 percent of the population between the ages of 19 and 64—will still struggle with health-care-related bills this year, according to NerdWallet Health.

And if you think only Americans without health insurance face financial troubles, think again. NerdWallet estimates nearly 10 million adults with year-round health-insurance coverage will still accumulate medical bills that they can’t pay off this year.

High-deductible insurance plans requiring consumers to pay more out-of-pocket costs are a challenge for many households.

“With an average American family bringing home $50,000 in income, a high medical bill and a high-deductible insurance plan can quickly become something they are unable to pay,” LaMontagne said. “If you have an out-of-pocket maximum of $5,000 or $10,000, that’s really tough,” he said.

The analysis of rising health costs is the first of its kind for NerdWallet.

Medical Bankruptcy by Age

Source: NerdWallet Health Analysis

Obamacare ‘Not a Panacea’

With millions buried under medical bills, more insured under the Affordable Care Act will not completely solve that problem, LaMontagne said. While the ACA’s reforms will indeed give more people coverage, NerdWallet’s data shows that millions of people with year-round, full coverage are still overwhelmed by medical bills, she said.

“I don’t think Obamacare is going to get rid of the situation,” LaMontagne said. “The data suggests that already-insured Americans are struggling. With the expansion of insurance, it doesn’t seem like that problem will go away entirely. It’s not a panacea.”

The number of medically related bankruptcies is slightly less than the rate of recent years. Despite the anticipated 2013 dip, such bankruptcies represent about three out of every five filings.

“A lot of Americans probably think about bankruptcy as coming from unpaid credit-card debt or mortgages,” LaMontagne said. “But the root cause of all those troubles may well be medical bills.”

Handling High Medical Costs Friday, 6 Feb 2009 | 10:16 PM ET

Not surprisingly, more than 11 million people will take on additional credit-card debt to cover mounting medical bills, LaMontagne said. Because credit cards often charge high interest rates for unpaid balances, debt only mounts, creating a vicious cycle for consumers.

Meanwhile, NerdWallet found, 1 5 million people will deplete their savings to cover medical bills. Another 10 million will be unable to pay for necessities such as rent, food and utilities because of those bills.

Skipping Prescription Medications

When their savings are gone and their credit cards are maxed out, stretched consumers take the drastic step of cutting back on prescription medications.

More than 25 million people are skipping doses, taking less medication or delaying refilling prescriptions to save money, NerdWallet found.

“That statistic is actually quite troubling,” LaMontagne said. Delaying needed medication is a short-term fix that only triggers more health problems in the long term, she said.


14/10/2017

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IUPUI Registrar – Course Offerings #iupui, #registrar, #student #records, #records, #iupui


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Office of the Registrar

Course Offerings

The list of scheduled courses offered at IUPUI for a given term is typically released one month prior to the beginning of priority registration. Spring courses are available in October, Fall courses in late January or February, and Summer courses in December.

Viewing Course Offerings via One.IU:
A real-time display of course availability and the open or closed status of individual classes is publicly accessible from One.IU using two different search tools – the SIS Class Search and the iGPS Course Search. Both tools offer a variety of filtering options to narrow search results.

  • SIS Class Search
  • 1. Navigate to: one.iu.edu .
  • 2. Click in the Search box and type schedule of classes and press ENTER.
  • 3. Click the schedule of classes task icon
  • iGPS Course Search
  • 1. Navigate to: one.iu.edu .
  • 2. Click in the Search box and type search courses and press ENTER.
  • 3. Click the Search Courses (Public) task icon

Course Listings By Department
If you are accustomed to reviewing the list of classes by subject that has historically posted on this website, please know this information is still available to you through the Class/Course Search tools above.

Using SIS Class Search.
Select the Institution, Term, and Course Career. Then insert the Department Code listed below that corresponds with your area of interest into the Course Subject field within the Class Search page. Click Search.

Using the iGPS Course Search :
Select the Campus. Degree Level. and Term Offered. Then enter the Department Code listed below into the Search field and click GO.


21/09/2017

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Consultant directory #consultants, #gps, #doctors, #surgeons, #anaesthetics, #burns #and #plastics, #cardiology,


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Consultant directory

With so many consultants, all with special interests, we appreciate it can be difficult for GPs to make the right referral choice, and it can be confusing for patients.

This consultant directory is offered as an easy reference guide to the specific clinical services and interests of all the consultants working at or for University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust.

Browse by category

Browse by category results: neurology

Dr Hani Benamer, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology Acute

Graduated from Tripoli. Obtained MRCP and neurology training in Glasgow. Gained PhD CCST. Special interest in movement disorders. Honorary lecturer at UoB with interest in medical education. Senior editor of Libyan Journal of Medicine.

Dr Nicholas P Davies, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology and Neuromuscular Conditions

Trained in Birmingham and the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London. Specialist interests include: Neuromuscular disorders, metabolic diseases and ion channel disorders.

Dr Roland O Etti, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology and Neuro Rehabilitation

Trained in neurology in Hull and Birmingham. Has an interest in general neurology, headaches and management of multiple sclerosis symptoms.

Dr Tom Hayton, Consultant Neurologist

MBChB from University of Edinburgh, PhD from UCL; trained in London and West Midlands;sub-speciality interest in traumatic brain injury.

Dr M Tom Heafield, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology Acute

Qualified at St Mary’s Hospital London in 1984, he was appointed to the Trust as consultant neurologist in 1994. He has a varied and broad interest in all aspects of clinical neurology and service developments.

Dr Saiju Jacob, Consultant Neurologist and Clinical Service Lead

Neurology training done in London and West Midlands with doctoral research and fellowship at Oxford. Special interest includes neuromuscular and neuroimmunology, with weekly clinics for each

Dr Alistair John Lewthwaite, Consultant Neurologist

Graduated from University of Birmingham, 2000. PhD in the Genetics of Parkinson’s Disease, 2009. Specialist interest in Parkinson’s Disease and other movement disorders, including assessment of patients for deep brain stimulation.

Dr Edward Littleton, Consultant Neurologist

Graduated from University College London (1996), having trained at Jesus College Cambridge and UCL medical school. Doctoral research in neuroimmunology undertaken at Oxford. Has a special interest in stroke.

Dr Gordon Mazibrada, Consultant Neurologist

Qualified as Doctor of Medicine from the University of Zagreb, Croatia in 1991. Professional areas of interest are multiple sclerosis and inflammatory disorders of the central nervous system.

Dr Dougall McCorry, Neuroscience Consultant

Trained at the Walton Centre, Liverpool, his MD is on the subject of understanding antiepileptic decision making. He is a member of the Association of British Neurology and International League Against Epilepsy.

Dr Niraj Mistry, Consultant Neurologist

Specialist interest MS. Clinical and pre-clinical training at the University of Cambridge, followed by basic Neurosciences training in Oxford then higher specialist Neurology training in Nottingham. Research MD from University of Cambridge.

Dr David Nicholl, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology Acute, Neuro-Genetics and Movement Disorders

Main research interests are in Parkinson’s disease and the genetics of neurodegenerative diseases. He also works at Birmingham City Hospital and lectures at the University of Birmingham.

Dr Hardev S Pall, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology Acute, Neurodegenerative and Parkinson’s Disease

Graduated from Bristol University in 1979. Had postgraduate training in Birmingham, London and Cambridge. Clinical interests in movement and motor neurone disorders. Has clinics for movement disorders and patients for deep brain stimulation surgery.

Professor Yusuf A Rajabally, Consultant Neurologist, Neuromuscular Disease and Peripheral Neuropathy

Main specialist interest in inflammatory neuropathy management. Runs several other specialist neuropathy clinics. Research active in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), Guillain-Barré syndrome and other acquired neuropathies.

Dr Vijay Sawlani, Consultant Neuroradiologist

Masters in neurovascular diseases, from the University of Paris and Mahidol. Interests include: advance applications of MRI including spectroscopy, perfusion, DTI and functional imaging in brain tumours, epilepsy and neurological disorders.

Dr Shanika Samarasekera, Consultant Neurologist

Graduated and trained in Newcastle and the West Midlands. Has a background in both Psychiatry (to membership level) and Neurology. Specialist interest in Epilepsy.

Dr Alexandra Sinclair, Consultant Neurologist

Graduated from the University of Birmingham in 2000 and obtained her MRCP in 2003, PhD in 2010 and her Certificate of Completion of Training in January 2012. Interests: headache and idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

Dr Imad N Soryal, Consultant in Rehabilitation, Medicine and Neurology

Qualified in Sudan in 1978. His specialties are in rehabilitation medicine and neurology.

Professor Steve Sturman, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology and Rehabilitation

A specialist in MS and Motor Assessment. he has interests in post-polio, head injuries, neuro-disabilities, stroke and neurorehabilitation.

Professor Adrian C Williams, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology Acute, Parkinson’s, MND

Professor of Clinical Neurology at the Regional Centre for Neurology at the Trust. He is also a senior advisor to the Parkinson’s Society.

Dr Mark Willmot, Consultant Neurologist with Interest in Stroke

Dr Willmot is a consultant neurologist with a sub-specialty interest in stroke. His interests involve the role of nitric oxide in the pathophysiology of stroke, patent foramen ovale in young stroke, blood pressure and the management of acute stroke.

Dr John B Winer, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology Acute, Neuromuscular Disorders and Polymyositis

Trained in Neurology at the Middlesex, Guy’s and St Mary’s hospitals in London, and the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery. Gained his first qualification in 1978. Current research is mainly focused on neuromuscular disease.

Dr John Woolmore, Consultant Neurologist

Clinical and research interests include multiple sclerosis and neuroinflammatory conditions of the central nervous system. He has two specialist clinics at the QE where his clinical focus is on disease modifying therapies within the field of MS care.

Dr Ben Wright. Consultant Neurologist

Graduated from University College London. Postgraduate training in Cambridge and Birmingham. Specialist interest in dystonia, Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders. I run the adult Wolfram syndrome multi-disciplinary clinic.

Contact us

Heritage Building
(Queen Elizabeth Hospital)

Mindelsohn Way
Edgbaston, Birmingham
B15 2TH

Tel: 0121 627 2000

Queen Elizabeth
Hospital Birmingham

Mindelsohn Way
Edgbaston, Birmingham
B15 2GW

Tel: 0121 627 2000


07/09/2017

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Department of Neurology at Miller School of Medicine #university #of #miami


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exp:news_feed:department site=”neurology” category_id=”291″ parse=”inward” year=”” month=”” count=”3″

Monoclonal antibodies could be a whole new class of therapies to treat debilitating episodic or chronic cluster headaches. For this reason, researchers are actively recruiting patients for an international, multicenter and randomized trial to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of one of these agents, galcanezumab, through the Department of Neurology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

Ralph L. Sacco, M.D. M.S. professor and chairman of neurology and Olemberg Family Chair in Neurological Disorders at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, was elected president of the American Academy of Neurology, the world’s largest professional association of neurologists.

Ralph L. Sacco, M.D. M.S. professor and chairman of Neurology and Olemberg Family Chair in Neurological Disorders at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, served as senior author of a companion editorial to a study that associates artificially sweetened beverages with stroke and dementia. The study findings and Sacco’s editorial were published in the American Heart Association journal Stroke.

Related Links


23/08/2017

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Orthopedic Center in Providence, East Greenwich, Middletown, Barrington – University Orthopedics


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PHYSICAL THERAPY

The Physical Therapists at University Orthopedics are important members of the multidisciplinary health care team. Upon referral to physical therapy at our Rhode Island offices, each patient receives a thorough assessment of his or her impairment and the physical therapist will plan a treatment regimen best suited to the individual problem. Read more.

SPINE THERAPY

One of the key features that differentiates us from other Rhode Island centers that treat back pain, including low back pain and sciatica, and neck pain is the spine-specialized therapy department at the University Orthopedics Spine Center. Read more.

HAND THERAPY

Our hand therapy department provides specialized rehabilitation services for patients with upper extremity dysfunction due to trauma or medical conditions. Services are provided by registered occupational therapists that have obtained specialized knowledge of the upper extremity through advanced training, continuing education courses, and independent study. Read more.

HOME THERAPY

A home exercise program is typically customized for an individual’s specific back problem. These exercises can be done on the living room rug while watching TV. Other stretching exercises can be done throughout the day to increase flexibility. Read more.

INJECTION THERAPY

Injection therapy is intended to be a means to an end. The goal is to provide the patient with enough pain relief to bridge from inactivity to physical therapy, where orthopedic problems can be better treated with special exercises. Read more.

WHY CHOOSE US?

The orthopedic center includes more than 25 board-certified orthopedic surgeons who are fellowship-trained, the highest level of medical training in the U.S. These specialists are clinical professors on the faculty of Brown University’s medical school as teachers of other new physicians, and leading the way with clinical research of the latest advances in orthopedic surgery and injury prevention.

HEALERS

Our specialists use advanced surgical instrumentation to correct the injury, enables the patient to go home the same day to the comfort of their home. Every medical specialty has become “sub-specialized” with super specialists that have the most advanced expertise in their particular niche.

INNOVATORS

University Orthopedics directs many clinical research efforts intended to innovate new orthopedic surgery techniques; new surgical implant devices that improve the success of various procedures; and new ways to prevent orthopedic injury.

TEACHERS

The physicians at University Orthopedics believe that just as they benefited from the educational training they received early on in their careers, they should return the expertise they gain through private practice by educating those coming out of medical schools who in turn take their expertise into the community.

I can’t say enough great things about Dr. Mark Palumbo. I injured my back at work, had some disc issues with horrible pain to the point I could barely walk. When other doctors said I would not ever be able to work my very physical job again, Dr. Palumbo proved them wrong. I have been back to work for over a year now.”

“I broke my left humerus in September 2013, I saw Dr. Got and he operated on me in October, it was a smooth recovery for me with the great team he had. I was back to work and back in the gym in four months. I would recommend anyone who experiences any bone break to go see Dr. Got.”

Dr. Bliss is awesome. I’m so grateful to have a doctor who cares about me. He listens and is genuinely concerned about my injury. The facility is well kept and staff is wonderful. I’d recommend them in a heartbeat.”

Amazing doctors, physical therapists, and facilities. The doctors are all very well educated and their staff are friendly as well. They also do a very good job of matching their patients to the physical therapists both in specialty and personality.”


02/08/2017

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Alternative Psoriasis Treatments – BodyTalk and EFT #, #alternative #medicine, #bodytalk,


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Posts may contain affiliate links, which allow me to earn a commission to support the site at no extra cost to you. Thank you!

Alternative Psoriasis Treatments BodyTalk and EFT

One of the most fundamental alternative psoriasis treatments I used was to change my state of mind .

When my skin went crazy last year, I was filled with a sense of hopelessness and despair. I knew that my mom’s skin had become inflamed and caused her over 10 years of misery, and some of the best doctor’s in the country had been able to do nothing lasting for her. I have always been told how much alike my mom and I were, and I *knew* I was likely to endure the same fate. After all, if over 20 doctors at Mayo Clinic couldn’t solve the problem, what chance did I have? This mindset contributed to my misery, as I saw no future but one filled with suffering.

When I believed it was impossible for me to heal, I created a feedback loop in my body, cranking up my level of problematic neurotransmitters and hormones inhibiting the healing process. (It’s also been shown that unhealthy gut bacteria further contribute to this feedback loop, which makes the dietary changes I outline in My Anti-Candida, Anti-Psoriasis Diet – 9 Steps Towards Healing even more important.)

There were two primary techniques that I used to address my mental health and get me on a path to healing EFT (Emotional Freedom Technique) and BodyTalk.

EFT (Emotional Freedom Technique) as an Alternative Psoriasis Treatment

I was introduced to EFT (also known as tapping ) last year by a friend of mine who said they used it for stress relief and to help them stay focused. I ordered a copy of The Tapping Solution for Pain Relief: A Step-by-Step Guide to Reducing and Eliminating Chronic Pain in July 2015 and used it to eliminate my nagging lower back pain.

There are a series of exercises in the book that help you work through emotional and physical baggage that’s accumulated over the years, let go of what’s not serving you well, and rewire your brain for healing.

How Does EFT tapping work?

Tapping uses gentle taps on a series of meridian points around the body (the same ones used for acupuncture, reflexology, etc) to rewire your body’s energy system. I know this may sound a little strange to many of you, but tens of thousands of people have used it with good results myself included. At the very least, it should do no harm.

The concept isn’t quite as odd as one might think initially, since quantum physics has shown that when you take things down to a subatomic levels, we (and all matter) is made up of high energy particles.

I found that I had a number of old wounds that weren’t really healed anger towards my stepdad and other’s who have been rotten to me, guilt that I didn’t do more, survivor’s guilt most of us manage to cram a lot of skeletons in the closet.

To go through a tapping sequence, you first start by choosing a problem to focus on and select a setup statement.

A setup statement is something such as, Even though I have (this problem), I love myself wholly and completely. You then tap the karate chop point the fleshly area on the side of the hand, and repeat this statement three times.

Now, tap 5-7 times each on the meridian points in the following sequence.

  • Start of the eyebrow, near the bridge of your nose
  • Side of the eye, near your temple
  • Under the eye
  • Under the nose
  • The crease between the chin and lip
  • The collarbone
  • Underneath the arm
  • Top of the head

As you tap each point, you say additional brief supporting statements, wrapping up at the top of the head. Jessica Ortner demonstrates below:

In my case, when addressing my psoriasis, I might start with a statement like, In spite of the inflammation of my skin, I love myself wholly and completely , and continue on with:

  • the inflammation is leaving my face
  • the inflammation is leaving my elbows
  • the inflammation is leaving my torso
  • my body is healing
  • the candida is dying back
  • my gut is healing
  • the healthy bacteria are thriving
  • my body is healing and I love myself completely

It sounds awkward, but I can tell the difference since I started using the technique. It’s also simple and quick and you can do it almost any time and anywhere.

BodyTalk as an Alternative Psoriasis Treatment

For this one you need a trained BodyTalk practitioner. (You can find a BodyTalk practitioner here. ) I’ve been blessed to have a dear friend who is also trained in a variety of healing modalities, including BodyTalk, MaryJean Bretton. (For the local folks, you can find Miss MaryJean at Feeling Much Better .)

BodyTalk takes a whole person approach to healing, looking at physical, mental, emotional and spiritual aspects of the individual. With MaryJean, no two sessions have been the same, because she sometimes uses the BodyTalk as a diagnostic tool and then uses other healing methods, and sometimes uses BodyTalk for the whole session. I have been to another practitioner, and their approach was also slightly different.

A brief medical history is taken, identifying particular symptoms, pains or chronic health issues. Fully clothed you will be asked to rest face up, on a massage table. You will be kept informed of the formulas being used. Most people feel relaxed as they are asked to breathe deeply while the BodyTalk practitioner gently taps on the head and sternum (heart complex). The duration of a session is not indicative of the quality of the session or the results that occur. Because your innate wisdom is dictating the session, you can be assured of receiving exactly what is needed at that particular time for the enhanced communication and balancing to take place. A BodyTalk session itself usually lasts between 15-45 minutes. Your innate wisdom will dictate when the session is complete and establish a time when you need to return for a follow-up session.

This a complementary healing treatment, working to enable the body to help heal itself. It is used in combination with other treatments for acute conditions.

You can view a BodyTalk demonstration below:

In my case, over these past few months we’ve worked on connections between the body systems, as well as emotional and spiritual problems. Although it was difficult to work through my problems at times, I feel like a burden has been lifted from me.

Have you used EFT or BodyTalk in your life? I’d love to hear about your experience.

Other posts in the series:


31/07/2017

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Stanford Addiction Medicine Fellowship Program #center #for #addiction #medicine


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Assistant Professor
Program Director
Stanford University Addiction Medicine Fellowship

Dr. Lembke received her undergraduate degree in Humanities from Yale University and her medical degree from Stanford University. She continued on at Stanford to complete a residency in psychiatry. She is currently Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine, where she also serves as Program Director of the Stanford University Addiction Medicine Fellowship; Chief of the Stanford Dual Diagnosis Clinic; and Chief of the Stanford Addiction Psychiatry Initiative. As a member of the Stanford faculty, Dr. Lembke sees patients, teaches, and does research. Her current work focuses on understanding the socioeconomic and cultural factors driving addiction. In April 2016, Dr. Lembke was elected as the inaugural President of the Addiction Medicine Fellowship Directors Association (AMFDA).

Clinical Assistant Professor, Associate Division Chief of Education and Associate Program Director, Pain Medicine

Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative Pain Medicine

Addiction Medicine Program, Department of Psychiatry Behavioral Sciences (by courtesy)

Jordan Newmark, MD, is a Clinical Assistant Professor and the Associate Division Chief of Education within the Division of Pain Medicine of the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative Pain Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. Additionally, he is the Associate Program Director of the Pain Medicine Fellowship. Dr. Newmark has long standing interested in the opioid related public health crisis facing the United States, specifically related to health provider and public education. His academic work involves the use of simulation and immersive learning to teach and study opioid prescribing pattern, as well as developing novel and innovative educational tools and techniques surrounding opioid safety and education. Dr. Newmark’s work in this space has led to a by courtesy appointment within the Addiction Medicine Program, Department of Psychiatry Behavioral Sciences.

Nicholas Ney, Ph.D.

Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor

Nicholas Ney, Ph.D. is a licensed psychologist in private practice in Redwood City, CA. He received his undergraduate degree from Hampshire College in creative writing/cultural anthropology. He continued his education at the California School of Professional Psychology, Berkeley, where he received both his masters and doctorate degrees. Dr. Ney completed his post-doctoral work at the Stanford Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science in the Alcohol Clinic, where he trained with Stephanie Brown, Ph.D. He was appointed the founding Coordinator of the Stanford Alcohol and Drug Treatment Center’s Structured Outpatient Program (S.O.P.), which he led for 4 ½ years, leading/co-leading over 1000 groups. He has taught in the field at local graduate programs, and helped develop a statewide California Psychological Association clearing house program for impaired psychologists. Dr. Ney has served as adjunct clinical faculty in the Stanford Psychiatry department for twenty-five years.

Tracy Chesler, MSW

LCSW, Psychiatric Social Worker, Complex Care Manager

Tracy Chesler received her undergraduate degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder, and went on to receive her Masters degree in Social Work from the University of California at Berkeley, graduating in 2003, and received her Licensed Clinical Social Work degree in 2006. Following graduate school, she worked in community mental-health agencies specializing in women’s health and addiction. She joined Stanford in 2004, at first working in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, and then moving to in-patient psychiatry in 2007. For the past 8 years, Tracy has specialized in psychiatric social work, joining the Dual Diagnosis Clinic in Stanford’s out-patient psychiatric department in 2014. In addition to her work in the Dual Diagnosis clinic, Tracy works in Stanford’s Early Psychosis clinic, sits on the hospital’s Shared Governance Committee, and provides clinical supervision for Stanford’s MSW staff.

Benefits

  • Moving allowance (new hires only) $3,000
  • Annual educational allowance $2,000
  • Cell phone allowance $1,000 *
  • Food allowance $10 per day (shifts of 12 hours or longer)
  • Housing stipend $6,000 per year (paid as $500 monthly)
  • Cost of initial CA MD license and renewals*
  • Cost of initial DEA and renewals*
  • Cost of USMLE III* s
  • Medical, dental, vision, and long term disability insurance provided.
  • 1% annual bonus based on completion of a Quality Improvent Project

* Please see House Staff Policies and Procedures for full details.
Subject to appropriate taxes

Related Links

Stanford Library

Stanford GME

Stanford Department of Medicine

American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM)

American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM)

California Society of Addiction Medicine (CSAM)

Research in Addiction Medicine Scholars (RAMS)

Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA)


24/07/2017

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Cerebral Palsy #cp, #cerebral #palsy, #wheelchair, #crutches, #congenital #disorder, #birth #defect,


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Cerebral Palsy

Maybe someone at your school has cerebral palsy — or perhaps you have it and you’ve been dealing with it your whole life. As we become more aware of appearance and body image. it can be tough to be in a wheelchair or to have people tease you about the way you walk. But lots of teens with CP don’t let it hold them back. They do just what everyone else does.

What Is Cerebral Palsy?

Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the brain. Normally, the brain tells the rest of the body exactly what to do and when to do it. Because of how CP affects the brain, a person might not be able to walk, talk, eat, or move the way most people do.

CP affects a person’s muscle tone and ability to coordinate body movements. People with CP have trouble controlling their muscles. How a person is affected all depends on what part of the brain is involved.

How Does Cerebral Palsy Affect People?

The three types of cerebral palsy are:

  1. Spastic (pronounced: SPASS-tik) CP is the most common type of CP. People with spastic CP can’t relax their muscles or the muscles may be stiff.
  2. Athetoid (pronounced: ATH-uh-toid) CP affects the ability to control the muscles of the body. A person’s arms or legs may flutter and move suddenly.
  3. Ataxic (pronounced: ay-TAK-sik). People with ataxic CP have problems with balance and coordination. Their movements may seem shaky.

People with CP can have mild cases or more severe cases. It all depends on how much of the brain is affected and which parts of the body that section of the brain controls. If CP affects both arms and both legs, a person might need to use a wheelchair. If CP only affects the legs, someone may walk in an unsteady way or have to wear braces or use crutches.

If CP affects the part of the brain that controls speech, a person with CP might have trouble talking clearly or not be able to speak at all. Some people with CP also have learning disabilities or behavior problems, though many don’t have these issues. Others can have medical problems like seizures or epilepsy. or hearing impairment.

What Causes It?

In most cases, doctors don’t know exactly what causes CP. They do know that it’s the result of damage to the brain — either while a baby is in the womb or in the first few months or years after the baby is born.

Babies have a higher chance of having CP if they are born early or if they’re very underweight at birth. Babies who don’t get enough oxygen during or right after birth also have a higher chance of having CP. So do babies who need to be on a ventilator (a machine to help with breathing) for several weeks or more after birth.

CP is not contagious, so people can’t catch it from other people. Even a mother with CP can’t pass it on to her unborn baby.

What Do Doctors Do?

Doctors diagnose CP when kids are young, so by the time people reach their teens, they usually know they have CP and are used to living with it.

With CP, the problem with the brain will not get any worse as people get older. For example, someone who has CP that affects only the legs won’t develop CP in the arms or have problems with speech later on.

Although CP doesn’t get worse over time, how it affects someone’s body can change as the person grows or develops. For example, some teens with CP may develop dislocated hips (when the bones that meet at the hips move out of their normal position) or scoliosis (curvature of the spine).

Because CP affects people differently, there are lots of ways to treat and manage it. Some teens have only mild problems with movement. Others need crutches or wheelchairs to get around. Doctors, parents, teachers, therapists, and the person with CP all work together to develop the best treatment plan.

Teens with CP may work with these experts:

  • a pediatric orthopedist
  • a developmental pediatrician who looks at how the person is growing or developing compared with other teens
  • a pediatric physiatrist (or rehabilitation physician), who helps kids with disabilities of many kinds
  • therapists, like physical therapists to help with movement, occupational therapists to help with skills like handwriting, and speech therapists

Some teens with CP take medicines to relax their muscles (in the case of spastic CP) or to help control seizures. And some might have special surgeries to keep their arms or legs straighter and more flexible.

Coping With Cerebral Palsy

Puberty can be especially challenging for people with CP. Rapid growth can cause weight gain and clumsiness in any teen, but can make it even more difficult for someone with CP to move around. A person’s muscles can become tighter as the bones grow, which can restrict movement even more.

If you have CP, what you’ll do depends on your CP. One thing you can do is to get more involved in your medical care wherever possible. Keep up with your appointments, including any physical or other therapy visits. This is a time when your medical team will want to keep an eye on you and adapt your treatment or therapy as you grow.

Many guys and girls with CP can do the same sorts of things that other teens do, like enjoying extracurricular activities, listening to or playing music, hanging out with friends, reading, going to the mall, and dating, to name just a few.

Helping a Friend Who Has CP

If you know someone who has CP and you’re wondering how to help, just treat that person the way you would anyone else. Some people with CP might need extra assistance once in a while, like when reaching for something. Help out — just as you would with anyone else — without making a big deal about it. If you can’t understand what a person with CP is saying or if it takes longer to do things, give him or her extra time to speak or move.

And don’t be afraid to talk to a friend about what it’s like to live with CP. Everyone wants to fit in, and being in a wheelchair or having other physical problems can make someone self-conscious or feel left out. So if you know someone with CP, try to be welcoming and include him or her in what you’re doing.

Date reviewed: August 2015


06/07/2017

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