MnSCU Farm Business Management – Welcome to Farm Business Management #minnesota,

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Welcome to Farm Business Management

In today s world, farming is a complex business with many facets. From the traditional family owned farm to the corporate farm, bookkeeping, profitability, tax planning and many other skills are required to complement traditional farming duties.

Agriculture is the number two industry in Minnesota, and Minnesota State Colleges and Universities offers many programs for farm owners and employees.

This site will help you explore the many possibilities that await.

Farm Business Management Education Programs

Minnesota State Colleges and Universities farm business management education programs are administered through eight college campuses at 46 different sites across the state. There are a total of 62 farm business management instructors.

Farm business management programs are designed to provide education to farm owners and operators or persons interested in farming. The purpose of the program is to assist students in meeting their business and personal goals. This is best accomplished through the use of quality records and sound business decisions. Effective financial management in the business is the best way for the business to maintain that competitive edge.

Instructors in Minnesota s farm business management education programs deliver the program using a variety of methods. The primary delivery method is through individualized instruction at the student s farming business. Instructors meet with the students on a regular basis to evaluate the business and develop individual educational plans. Instruction is also delivered in the traditional classroom, small group meetings, field trips and tours.

Farm business management education is managed at the state level by the senior system director for workforce development and customized training. The state of Minnesota is divided into six regions which are managed by five regional deans of management education.





27/08/2017

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Midwest Akita Rescue Society – Available Orphans #akita, #rescue, #mars #akita

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Midwest Akita Rescue Society

AVAILABLE ORPHANS

Are all equal in our eyes young or old, show quality or pet
We see them through the eyes of rescue
Beyond physical apperance, beyond age, beyond judgment
Each one deserving of love, compassion and a forever home
We see their spirit and love them equally
We kindly ask that you do the same.

MARS has Akitas available for fostering and adoption at several midwest locations. See additional information on the breed and our application .

Many of the Akitas we rescue require extended veterinary and foster care before they become available for adoption. Our adoption fee covers only a very small portion of these expenses. We rely heavily on generous donations from our fellow Akita lovers.

Hi, my name is Dakota. I�m 6 years old, 78 lbs and a Virgo. I love butt rubs, knucklebones, walks, hotdogs and lying outside in the fenced backyard. I don�t care much for baths, cats, other dogs and strangers � as you can tell, I�m a pretty typical Akita.

I would love to have a REAL forever home. I have had two since I arrived in a kennel in Cleveland, Ohio as a MARS foster dog in 2011 and both of them failed me. The people at the kennel were really nice and I was able to go for fun walks with them but then they told me I was getting adopted and going to my “forever home” with my new Dad. I was very happy for almost a year but then Dad’s new wife brought home a little dog and I had to go since my new “Mom” didn�t want a big dog so Dad sent me back to MARS in November of 2012.

This time I ended up in Menomonie Wisconsin in another kennel. I enjoyed myself there – played a lot, went to obedience class and became “kennel buddies” with another foster Akita, Addie. But then, my dreams came true and my next “forever family” came and adopted me in July of 2013. I was so happy. I had a Mom, Dad, a teenage sister and best of all � I was the only pet. I finally found where I was supposed to be! Then, my “forever family” had some personal issues and though I tried living with my “Dad”, it wasn’t working with his schedule. “Mom” had already gone out and gotten a cat so I wasn’t welcome there either. Back to MARS I went, again. I waited with my “not-so-forever” parents in a parking lot for my foster Mom to come and get me. I couldn’t understand what I did wrong but my foster Mom said it wasn’t my fault. She cried while I looked out that back window for a long time, even though I couldn’t see my “family” anymore.

I was really sad for the first couple of weeks but my “kennel buddy”, Addie, was still there and my foster parents showed me lots of love (even though they put me on a diet!!) so I felt better soon. Things were great for a while, I even started going for walks with Addie, got to run in the HUGE backyard, got lots and lots of “butt rubs” and knuckle bones. But then, I started to have trouble getting up and it hurt to run. My foster parents took me to see Dr. Margaret and after some x-rays she told them that I have hip dysplasia. Now I get these yummy fish oil pills (I save them for dessert after my breakfast), something called “Cosequin DS” sprinkled on my food (I don�t like the chewable pills) and a anti-inflammatory pill (my foster Mom says it’s only a very small dose). I also go to see Dr. Margaret every 10 weeks for a chiropractic adjustment and I FEEL GREAT. I run so fast and have soooo much energy – who would guess that I was going to be 6 this year. I love my foster parents and my “kennel buddy” Addie but I would really like a home and family of my own where I can be the only 4 legged princess of the house. But for now, until my REAL FOREVER FAMILY finds me, I will wait patiently.

Luna is healthy chunk of brindle female Akita. She is spayed and current with shots, and in all ways healthy and active.

Luna was born with some congenital vision issues that have impaired her now, but will ultimately result in blindness. Her ophthalmological specialist says she has vision in both eyes that is reduced by juvenile cataracts, which at some point in the future may warrant removal to extend her time with serviceable vision. But sadly, there is no treatment that will prevent the inevitable loss of her vision.

She knows the basics commands: Sit, Shake, and “get out of the kitchen.” She has proven to be quite smart and resilient, as she quickly has adapted to her foster surroundings. She thunders up and down stairs and it is impossible to tell there is a vision issue at all. In unfamiliar surroundings it is more easily observed as she occasionally bumps into things in her peripheral areas. She thrives out in the world so long as her companion is there to lookout for her. Confident even off-leash, when in a new place she prefers to stay close and relies on her friends for navigational clues.

Luna is charming and enthusiastically greets people. She’s extremely playful towards the two large male Akitas with whom she fosters. Luna is assertive when seeking attention, walks, or rides in the car. She sleeps in the same bed as a cat and has never shown a hint of aggression towards anything. She’s always willing to share her food, toys, and treats. Luna loves being outside and is fascinated by the geese, squirrels, and golfers that pass by.

The ideal situation would be to get Luna settled into a stable forever home that understands the future challenges and is sensitive to the needs of a visually impaired member of the family. It would be best for her to acclimate to the new environment and routine while young and her vision is fairly functional. She is a 6 month-old baby who will brighten the lives of those around her and a very special girl who needs just a little help to have an active and happy life.

Meet Our New Orphan � Handsome Hank! “I used to walk in the shade with my blues on parade, but I’m not afraid-this rover’s crossed over”. to rescue!

Here’s Hank on his way out of the shelter in Louisville, and on his way to the safety and security of rescue. Hank is in a temporary foster home with MARS and would love to leave his worries on the doorstep of a more permanent foster home, or even better, a forever home.

PS: Our sincere thanks to our wonderful friends at the Metro Louisville Shelter who always look beyond the stereotypes and see the dog that is in front of them and to all those helping Hank to safety.

Joy is a very gorgeous 6 1/2 year old female who is not having a lot of joy in her life at the present time. Joy’s life long caregivers went into a nursing home due to age and poor health and the remaining family members took Joy to a shelter. She not only lost her home but found herself in a kill shelter. MARS, upon being notified of her predicament, evaluated her and found her to be a very well-behaved beautiful Akita who really needed to be back in someone’s home and heart. She is trained and fully vetted now and is a perfect example of Akita endurance.

Akitas are wonderful, but they are not for everyone. If you are thinking of getting an Akita, we strongly urge you to research the breed thoroughly. Education and preparation are the foundations to a long, loving relationship. Finding a reputable rescue organization or breeder is the first step. For further information on the breed please read the literature under Akita Information at the top of this screen or visit the Akita Club of America website at http://www.akitaclub.org





06/08/2017

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Data Centers and HIPAA Compliance #hipaa #compliant #data #center, #data #center

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Data Centers and HIPAA Compliance

Thanks for visiting! If this is your first time on our site, we encourage you to sign up for our monthly Data Cave Echoes newsletter. to stay up to date with the latest data center industry news!

There have been questions about what role a data center plays when it comes to HIPAA. We want to address what requirements and obligations data centers have when working with clients in the healthcare industry.

First of all, what is HIPAA? The acronym stands for the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, enacted to protect the health information of patients. When you visit a doctor’s office or the emergency room at your local hospital, all the people seeing your medical history have signed some sheet of paper, promising to keep your information private. This means to disclose healthcare information, they must have your permission (or authorization from the proper authorities in cases of child abuse, etc.). HIPAA also covers how physical and electronic data is handled and secured. Healthcare entities must backup their data and have a disaster recovery plan in place. This is where data centers come in.

The Health Information and Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act was enacted on February 17, 2009. This Act requires covered entities to disclose breaches in Protected Health Information (PHI). The covered entities and their business associates that “access, maintain, retain, modify, record, store, destroy, or otherwise hold, use, or disclose unsecured PHI” are required to notify the Department of Health and Human Services or any breaches. The business associates must notify the covered entity of a breach who in turn notifies the individuals involved (patients) and the HHS if more than 500 individuals were affected. From the statement above, data centers like Data Cave, would be considered a business associate.

The problem is there is much to speculate on what this actually means. Some data centers use HIPAA compliance as a marketing tool. Let me make something clear, there is no certification for HIPAA. A data center can be HIPAA compliant, which is what we at Data Cave consider ourselves. Some pay an outside source to come in, look around, and put their stamp of approval on the facility. For Data Cave, meeting HIPAA compliance means limiting people with access to equipment, including our own staff. This also means notifying the proper channels when someone has been near a healthcare entity’s equipment. With most healthcare companies, they are going to want to manage their own equipment, which means our staff wouldn t need to touch it anyway. However, for a data center doing managed services, facility staff would be responsible. In that case the facility would enter into an agreement with the customer to maintain confidentiality. In the event of a breach, whether virtual or physical, a data center would notify the customer (the covered entity) who would, in turn, notify the HHS if applicable.

In other words, no one can claim HIPAA certification. To take it a step further, the essence of a data center is to be secure; so in that case, aren’t we all HIPAA compliant?

To find out more about Data Cave and HIPAA compliance, call us at 866-514-2283 or Contact Us via our website.

More from my site

  • HIPAA, Health Care and Social Media
  • Indiana Data Center Disaster Recovery
  • The Data Cave Advantage, Part 1
  • Disaster Recovery Planning Can Save Your Business
  • Data Center Dictionary: Colocation
  • Whitepaper: Understanding HIPAA and HITECH Compliance




03/08/2017

Posted In: NEWS

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