New Low-Cost Airline: PEOPLExpress Tickets Go on Sale – NBC News

#price of airline tickets
#

New Low-Cost Airline: PEOPLExpress Tickets Go on Sale

The days of the airline stewardess joke — coffee, tea, or me? — are gone in more ways than one.

Tickets from $59 went on sale Wednesday afternoon for PEOPLExpress. the new airline that seeks to capitalize on the goodwill for the name of one of the first low-budget airlines that disappeared decades ago amid industry consolidation. But with its new a la carte pricing for everything from overhead bin space to coffee, tea and water, unprepared fliers may be in for sticker shock.

All of the airline’s flights will be in and out of its hub at Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport in Virginia, with only three destinations when it starts flying June 30. The airline’s two daily round-trip flights to Newark, New Jersey, will start with base fares from $76 each way; a daily round-trip to Boston will cost $76 each way; and its daily round-trip to Pittsburgh will cost $59 each way.

Service to West Palm Beach, Florida, will start July 15 with one daily round-trip flight and fares priced from $89 each way.

Flights to Atlanta will start Aug. 1 with one-way fares priced at $79. The Atlanta route will offer round-trip service once a day, except Tuesdays.

On Aug. 28, service will start to New Orleans for $119 each way as well as to St. Petersburg/Clearwater, Florida, from $89 each way. Only three weekly round-trips will be offered to St. Petersburg and New Orleans.

All those fares come with a serious restrictions apply asterisk as fliers will have to pay extra for services that many other airlines still offer for free.

On board, coffee or tea will sell for $1; soft drinks water and juice will cost $2; beer will be $5; and a proper cocktail will set you back $7.

Carry-on bags in overhead bins will cost $25 per bag per flight segment while a single checked bag will cost $20, and a second will add $25 more and if you must, $75 for a third. If you have to check a bag at the gate, that’s $50, and if it’s overweight, an extra $75 fee will apply. An exit-row seat will cost an extra $25 each way while more comfortable Living Large seats will cost an extra $59 per flight segment. Advance seat assignments cost $15 each way.

On board, coffee or tea will sell for $1; soft drinks water and juice will cost $2; beer will be $5; and a proper cocktail will set you back $7. The good news comes on the snacks pricing: Complimentary.

Carry-on bags will be free if they fit under your seat, a company spokesman said.

This past Friday, the airline announced it would launch. and technically will be known as Vision Airlines, dba PEOPLExpress while it gets its full certification from the Federal Aviation Administration. It will fly leased 150-seat Boeing 737-400 aircraft operated by Las Vegas-based Vision Airlines.

PEOPLExpress hopes to expand to 24 cities within five years, with hubs in Pittsburgh; New Orleans; San Antonio, Texas; and Atlantic City, New Jersey, CEO Jeff Erickson told CNBC in an interview last week.

At its first hub, the airline will operate two gates on Concourse A at Newport News. Tickets can only be purchased through its website or its call center, which is open daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Eastern time.

The original PEOPLExpress began flying in 1981 and was based at Newark. It was later acquired by Continental, which was then acquired by United. The new airline has adopted the old logo, but with a new green scheme rather than the old brown, burgundy and orange. Otherwise the new airline is not affiliated with the old airline of the same name, Erickson said, except that some of the executives worked for the old airline.

PEOPLExpress isn’t the only new airline with plans to take off this year. An all-business class airline, tentatively called Dream Jet, has announced plans to fly between Paris and New York. And Eastern Air Lines Group has filed its initial application with the U.S. Department of Transportation to begin operations.





06/12/2017

Posted In: NEWS

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Comment

Comcast in new york #comcast #corp,nbc #universal,mergers #acquisitions #and #divestitures,national #broadcasting


#

G.E. Makes It Official: NBC Will Go to Comcast

The Comcast Center, second from left, in Philadelphia on Thursday. Credit Matt Rourke/Associated Press

After nearly nine months of negotiations, Comcast. the nation’s largest cable operator, announced an agreement on Thursday to acquire NBC Universal from the General Electric Company .

The deal valued NBC Universal at about $30 billion.

The agreement will create a joint venture, with Comcast owning 51 percent and G.E. owning 49 percent. Comcast will contribute to the joint venture its stable of cable channels, which includes Versus, the Golf Channel and E Entertainment, worth about $7.25 billion, and will pay G.E. about $6.5 billion in cash, for a total of $13.75 billion. For now, the network will remain NBC Universal, but ultimately Comcast could decide to change the name.

Almost immediately, the transaction reshapes the nation’s entertainment industry, giving a cable provider a huge portfolio of new content, even as it raises the sector’s anxieties about the future.

In a joint statement announcing the agreement. Brian L. Roberts, the chief executive of Comcast, said the deal was “a perfect fit for Comcast and will allow us to become a leader in the development and distribution of multiplatform ‘anytime, anywhere’ media that American consumers are demanding.” The deal’s genesis lies in frequent flirtations over the last several years between Comcast and General Electric, although serious talks began in March. For Comcast, the purchase is the realization of its long-held ambition to be a major producer of television shows and movies.

News of the negotiations broke in late September, and in the ensuing weeks G.E. worked to resolve details with Comcast, while simultaneously negotiating to buy out a 20 percent stake in NBC Universal held by Vivendi, the French telecommunications conglomerate. It was this last part that proved difficult. G.E. and Comcast’s part of the transaction has essentially been complete for weeks, but the final step was held up by the negotiations between G.E. and Vivendi. Vivendi will receive about $5.8 billion for its stake.

Jeff Zucker, the current head of NBC Universal, will stay on as chief executive and report to the chief operating officer of Comcast, Steve Burke. In a statement released by the companies Thursday morning, Mr. Zucker called the deal the “start of a new era” for NBC .

The deal could take up to 18 months to pass regulatory muster. Although Comcast is based in Philadelphia, NBC’s headquarters will remain in New York, the joint release said.

Most of NBC’s value is in its lucrative cable channels — USA, Bravo, SyFy, CNBC and MSNBC. These networks, along with the channels that Comcast will contribute to the joint venture, will compose 82 percent of the company’s cash flow. The NBC network and Universal Studios will account for only a small portion of the joint venture’s cash flow.

In some respects, G.E.’s decision to sell reflects a desire to exit a business that never quite meshed with its industrial side. “It’s something I always thought about,” said Jeffrey R. Immelt, G.E.’s chief executive, in an interview. “In some ways my thinking gets shaped by the totality of G.E.”

He said that the economic recession also affected his thinking, adding, “you never have an epiphany.”

NBC’s headquarters will remain in New York, the companies said. Credit Mark Lennihan/Associated Press

NBC has been mired in fourth place among the major broadcast networks, and the economics of the broadcast television business has deteriorated in recent years amid declining overall ratings and a decline in advertising. By contrast, cable channels have continued to thrive because they rely on a steady stream of subscriber fees from cable companies like Comcast.

Mr. Roberts, the Comcast chief executive, failed in 2004 with a hostile takeover bid for the Walt Disney Company. Since then, the company has taken a less ambitious approach to content, buying a stake in MGM and building up smaller cable channels and regional sports networks. On Thursday, Mr. Roberts said, “I believe our company is strategically complete.”

Shortly after news of the deal leaked in September, G.E. and Comcast signed a standstill agreement, which effectively blocked other bidders from entering the fray. Previously, G.E. had sought to entice Time Warner. More recently Rupert Murdoch, who controls the News Corporation, considered making an offer for NBC Universal.

Newsletter Sign Up

Thank you for subscribing.

An error has occurred. Please try again later.

You are already subscribed to this email.

On Capitol Hill, a number of lawmakers said they would hold hearings to examine the deal in detail. Herb Kohl, Democrat of Wisconsin and the chairman of the Senate Antitrust, Competition Policy and Consumer Rights Subcommittee, said he would convene a hearing about the deal “so that consumers can get a better sense of how this deal could affect their access to diverse programming and information, especially as they more often look to the Internet for such services.”

Michael J. Copps, a commissioner of the Federal Communications Commission who regularly opposes media consolidation, said in a statement that “every citizen has a stake here,” given the size of the combined entity. “The lodestar for this review must be the public interest,” he said.

Foreseeing a long regulatory fight, Comcast published a letter on Thursday that outlined commitments to enrich and extend programming for children and minority groups. It also said policies would remain in place to ensure independence for NBC’s news division.

Asked about the NBC broadcast network and its affiliate structure, Mr. Roberts said in an interview, “We’re committed to free, over-the-air broadcast television continuing.” But he and other Comcast executives acknowledged that broadcasters faced continuing threats to their business model.

Mr. Zucker reassured employees of NBC Universal that given the regulatory hurdles ahead, “for now, it remains business as usual.”

Mr. Immelt said G.E. may consult its future partners on occasion over certain deals. G.E. will still be managing the company when certain significant television rights deals come open for bid within the next year. Under G.E. NBC has become the exclusive rights holder to every summer Olympics since 1988 and every winter Olympics since 2002.

Referring to the coming games in Vancouver and London, which NBC already owns the rights to, Mr. Zucker said, “We’re excited for next year and 2012,” and stressed the company would remain in the bidding for the games in 2014 and 2016.

Mindful of past deals that failed on their promise of synergies, Comcast made sure to point out that the financial projections underlying the deal took no account of any potential cost savings from combining the various assets.

For the thousands of employees of both companies, that is good news. Comcast has about 100,000 employees, while NBC Universal employs about 30,000. Mr. Burke, the Comcast executive who will oversee the joint venture, said, “99.9 percent of those employees are in businesses that don’t overlap.”

Bill Carter and Brian Stelter contributed reporting.

A version of this article appears in print on December 4, 2009, on Page B3 of the New York edition with the headline: G.E. Makes It Official: NBC Will Go to Comcast. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe


30/09/2017

Posted In: NEWS

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Comment

New Low-Cost Airline: PEOPLExpress Tickets Go on Sale – NBC News

#price of airline tickets
#

New Low-Cost Airline: PEOPLExpress Tickets Go on Sale

The days of the airline stewardess joke — coffee, tea, or me? — are gone in more ways than one.

Tickets from $59 went on sale Wednesday afternoon for PEOPLExpress. the new airline that seeks to capitalize on the goodwill for the name of one of the first low-budget airlines that disappeared decades ago amid industry consolidation. But with its new a la carte pricing for everything from overhead bin space to coffee, tea and water, unprepared fliers may be in for sticker shock.

All of the airline’s flights will be in and out of its hub at Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport in Virginia, with only three destinations when it starts flying June 30. The airline’s two daily round-trip flights to Newark, New Jersey, will start with base fares from $76 each way; a daily round-trip to Boston will cost $76 each way; and its daily round-trip to Pittsburgh will cost $59 each way.

Service to West Palm Beach, Florida, will start July 15 with one daily round-trip flight and fares priced from $89 each way.

Flights to Atlanta will start Aug. 1 with one-way fares priced at $79. The Atlanta route will offer round-trip service once a day, except Tuesdays.

On Aug. 28, service will start to New Orleans for $119 each way as well as to St. Petersburg/Clearwater, Florida, from $89 each way. Only three weekly round-trips will be offered to St. Petersburg and New Orleans.

All those fares come with a serious restrictions apply asterisk as fliers will have to pay extra for services that many other airlines still offer for free.

On board, coffee or tea will sell for $1; soft drinks water and juice will cost $2; beer will be $5; and a proper cocktail will set you back $7.

Carry-on bags in overhead bins will cost $25 per bag per flight segment while a single checked bag will cost $20, and a second will add $25 more and if you must, $75 for a third. If you have to check a bag at the gate, that’s $50, and if it’s overweight, an extra $75 fee will apply. An exit-row seat will cost an extra $25 each way while more comfortable Living Large seats will cost an extra $59 per flight segment. Advance seat assignments cost $15 each way.

On board, coffee or tea will sell for $1; soft drinks water and juice will cost $2; beer will be $5; and a proper cocktail will set you back $7. The good news comes on the snacks pricing: Complimentary.

Carry-on bags will be free if they fit under your seat, a company spokesman said.

This past Friday, the airline announced it would launch. and technically will be known as Vision Airlines, dba PEOPLExpress while it gets its full certification from the Federal Aviation Administration. It will fly leased 150-seat Boeing 737-400 aircraft operated by Las Vegas-based Vision Airlines.

PEOPLExpress hopes to expand to 24 cities within five years, with hubs in Pittsburgh; New Orleans; San Antonio, Texas; and Atlantic City, New Jersey, CEO Jeff Erickson told CNBC in an interview last week.

At its first hub, the airline will operate two gates on Concourse A at Newport News. Tickets can only be purchased through its website or its call center, which is open daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Eastern time.

The original PEOPLExpress began flying in 1981 and was based at Newark. It was later acquired by Continental, which was then acquired by United. The new airline has adopted the old logo, but with a new green scheme rather than the old brown, burgundy and orange. Otherwise the new airline is not affiliated with the old airline of the same name, Erickson said, except that some of the executives worked for the old airline.

PEOPLExpress isn’t the only new airline with plans to take off this year. An all-business class airline, tentatively called Dream Jet, has announced plans to fly between Paris and New York. And Eastern Air Lines Group has filed its initial application with the U.S. Department of Transportation to begin operations.





22/07/2017

Posted In: NEWS

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Comment

Nomadic Retirees – Sell Home to Travel the World – NBC

#travel the world
#

Nomadic Retirees Sell Home to Travel the World

Carefree travel has long been the province of backpackers, 20-somethings and other free spirits without mortgages, jobs and other worldly concerns.

But if retired couple Lynne and Tim Martin have their way, there will be a new model for the wave of aging baby boomers nearing retirement: Hit the road, travel around the world, and live like locals in cities and villages for extended periods of time, with no permanent home.

Lynne, 73, and Tim, 68, began their adventure in 2010, when they realized they shared a deep desire to travel and yearned for something a bit different for retirement. So soon after they sold their California home and set out to live abroad, one country at a time.

Lynne calls it the “home free” movement, a term she lays claim to coining when she named the blog she created, “Home Free Adventures ,” to keep family and friends in the loop.

Lynne’s new memoir Home Sweet Anywhere: How We Sold Our House, Created a New Life, and Saw The World, released Tuesday, recounts the couple’s journey — from details of how they downsized most of their belongings and pared down expenses to vivid encounters of living in diverse regions of the world. The book, organized chronologically, is sprinkled with stories, tips and advice, aimed to inspire.

Home Sweet Anywhere book Sourcebooks

Over the past four years, the Martins have lived in nine countries. It’s a dream they feel that is within reach for others — with proper planning.

The Martins, who like to call themselves “nomadic retirees” or “senior gypsies,” currently are based in a colorful neighborhood on Staten Island, which is much cheaper than Manhattan, while they promote the book. “It’s like its own little country,” she said, with many people from Haiti and other Caribbean islands. “We discovered a beautiful promenade along the river. It’s gorgeous, with trees and flowers about to bloom. It looks like Paris.”

Travel is good medicine. Because it challenges the brain with new and different experiences and environments, it is an important behavior that promotes brain health and builds brain resilience across the lifespan.

The couple said their experiences resonate, and not just with older adults. “A lot of mail comes from people in their 30s, even in their 40s, who traveled as students,” said Lynne, in response to her blog posts and a Wall Street Journal article she wrote in 2012. “They will tell us they thought their traveling years were all over, so they are thrilled.”

Desire for a more mobile retirement may be a good thing, according to AARP, a nonprofit membership organization for people age 50 and older that recently launched AARP Travel. a new website to help older people manage travel planning.

“Travelers tend to be in a better place physically, emotionally, and financially than non-travelers,” said Sami Hassanyeh, chief digital officer for AARP. “As one expert put it, ‘Travel is good medicine. Because it challenges the brain with new and different experiences and environments, it is an important behavior that promotes brain health and builds brain resilience across the lifespan.’”

The Martins’ tone may be lighthearted, but their message is serious. “Our big mantra is ‘postpone nothing,’” said Tim. Anytime is a good time to travel, “as long as you are healthy,” which can be unpredictable as people age, he said, “so postponing is a mistake.”

The couple also stresses the importance of making practical decisions.

“We didn’t spend all of the money from the sale of a house traveling around the world. That’s not what we’re doing,” Tim said. “We still live on the same stipend as we did before we sold the house. Nothing has changed. We are being fiscally conservative,” he said, budgeting carefully and working closely with a financial adviser.

It hasn’t all been easy. In Buenos Aires, for example, detailed in chapter four of the book, Lynne recounts problems that made them leave early. “It made us question our tolerance and flexibility, and if we were able to live this life,” she said. There were mistakes along the way, too, but they were learning experiences. When they started out, there was no blueprint or road map, and they relied on trial and error. “Everything has been valuable,” she said.

After the book promotion, the couple will head to Paris for a few months, beginning in June, followed by a visit to family in California in September. October will find them back in San Miguel de Allende, where their travels began nearly four years ago, and then off to Ecuador. In 2015, they plan a big trip to South Asia. They plan to travel to less challenging locations, like within the U.S. as they age.

“It’s isn’t all pretty, but it’s all been rewarding,” Tim said, noting that their richest experiences have been personal encounters along the way. “It always comes down to people.”

“This has been quite a journey,” Lynne said. “It’s been fun. It’s been really fun.”





22/07/2017

Posted In: NEWS

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Comment

Nomadic Retirees – Sell Home to Travel the World – NBC

#travel the world
#

Nomadic Retirees Sell Home to Travel the World

Carefree travel has long been the province of backpackers, 20-somethings and other free spirits without mortgages, jobs and other worldly concerns.

But if retired couple Lynne and Tim Martin have their way, there will be a new model for the wave of aging baby boomers nearing retirement: Hit the road, travel around the world, and live like locals in cities and villages for extended periods of time, with no permanent home.

Lynne, 73, and Tim, 68, began their adventure in 2010, when they realized they shared a deep desire to travel and yearned for something a bit different for retirement. So soon after they sold their California home and set out to live abroad, one country at a time.

Lynne calls it the “home free” movement, a term she lays claim to coining when she named the blog she created, “Home Free Adventures ,” to keep family and friends in the loop.

Lynne’s new memoir Home Sweet Anywhere: How We Sold Our House, Created a New Life, and Saw The World, released Tuesday, recounts the couple’s journey — from details of how they downsized most of their belongings and pared down expenses to vivid encounters of living in diverse regions of the world. The book, organized chronologically, is sprinkled with stories, tips and advice, aimed to inspire.

Home Sweet Anywhere book Sourcebooks

Over the past four years, the Martins have lived in nine countries. It’s a dream they feel that is within reach for others — with proper planning.

The Martins, who like to call themselves “nomadic retirees” or “senior gypsies,” currently are based in a colorful neighborhood on Staten Island, which is much cheaper than Manhattan, while they promote the book. “It’s like its own little country,” she said, with many people from Haiti and other Caribbean islands. “We discovered a beautiful promenade along the river. It’s gorgeous, with trees and flowers about to bloom. It looks like Paris.”

Travel is good medicine. Because it challenges the brain with new and different experiences and environments, it is an important behavior that promotes brain health and builds brain resilience across the lifespan.

The couple said their experiences resonate, and not just with older adults. “A lot of mail comes from people in their 30s, even in their 40s, who traveled as students,” said Lynne, in response to her blog posts and a Wall Street Journal article she wrote in 2012. “They will tell us they thought their traveling years were all over, so they are thrilled.”

Desire for a more mobile retirement may be a good thing, according to AARP, a nonprofit membership organization for people age 50 and older that recently launched AARP Travel. a new website to help older people manage travel planning.

“Travelers tend to be in a better place physically, emotionally, and financially than non-travelers,” said Sami Hassanyeh, chief digital officer for AARP. “As one expert put it, ‘Travel is good medicine. Because it challenges the brain with new and different experiences and environments, it is an important behavior that promotes brain health and builds brain resilience across the lifespan.’”

The Martins’ tone may be lighthearted, but their message is serious. “Our big mantra is ‘postpone nothing,’” said Tim. Anytime is a good time to travel, “as long as you are healthy,” which can be unpredictable as people age, he said, “so postponing is a mistake.”

The couple also stresses the importance of making practical decisions.

“We didn’t spend all of the money from the sale of a house traveling around the world. That’s not what we’re doing,” Tim said. “We still live on the same stipend as we did before we sold the house. Nothing has changed. We are being fiscally conservative,” he said, budgeting carefully and working closely with a financial adviser.

It hasn’t all been easy. In Buenos Aires, for example, detailed in chapter four of the book, Lynne recounts problems that made them leave early. “It made us question our tolerance and flexibility, and if we were able to live this life,” she said. There were mistakes along the way, too, but they were learning experiences. When they started out, there was no blueprint or road map, and they relied on trial and error. “Everything has been valuable,” she said.

After the book promotion, the couple will head to Paris for a few months, beginning in June, followed by a visit to family in California in September. October will find them back in San Miguel de Allende, where their travels began nearly four years ago, and then off to Ecuador. In 2015, they plan a big trip to South Asia. They plan to travel to less challenging locations, like within the U.S. as they age.

“It’s isn’t all pretty, but it’s all been rewarding,” Tim said, noting that their richest experiences have been personal encounters along the way. “It always comes down to people.”

“This has been quite a journey,” Lynne said. “It’s been fun. It’s been really fun.”





18/04/2017

Posted In: NEWS

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Comment