Portugal: Travel Leisure’s 2016 Destination of the Year, Travel Leisure, portugal

Why Portugal is Travel + Leisure’s 2016 Destination of the Year

The small European country captured our attention this year—economic growth and diversity of landscape were just a few reasons it was at the top of every traveler’s list. Read on to find out why Travel + Leisure has named Portugal its 2016 Destination of the Year.

Just a few years ago, Portugal’s future was looking dim. At the peak of Europe’s debt crisis, the country teetered on the edge of bankruptcy, its economy more crippled than it had been in almost 40 years. State funding for the arts was slashed; the Portuguese ministry of culture was so hard-hit by budget cuts it all but disappeared. In one painfully symptomatic moment, the government was inches away from auctioning off a collection of works by the Catalan artist Joan Miró to pay off state debts.

But in the wake of the crash, Portugal has managed to flourish anew. Austerity measures dried up government funding for cultural initiatives, so artists and entrepreneurs turned to their communities to drum up support. As buildings and factories closed, art collectives and locally run businesses opened up in their place, and the world slowly started to take note. In some small way, the crash may even have helped the nation’s tourism industry: The country remained markedly less expensive for travelers than most of its European neighbors, a contrast that’s particularly evident in Portugal’s resort towns and cultural capitals, which have seen a growing number of visitors in recent years.

When it’s time to choose our Destination of the Year, we here at Travel + Leisure look to the places that feel exciting, that warrant rediscovery, that have come into their own and stepped onto the international stage in some new way. In 2016, Portugal was a natural fit. As our editor, Nathan Lump, writes in the December issue, Portugal is “exhibiting a dynamism that feels fresh and distinctive.” The nation’s bounceback has long been underway, but the past couple of years seem to have been a turning point, and the data proves it. According to the Portugal News, foreign tourism to Portugal grew by a record-breaking 10 percent in 2015, and 2016 is expected to improve even further. U.S. travel to the country grew 22 percent in 2016, outpacing even the overall growth in international tourism. Flights have increased—you can now travel nonstop from eight U.S. cities—and this October, a 119 percent growth in North American bookings helped Portuguese airline TAP to achieve the best October in its 60-year history. More than 40 new hotels opened in 2016, most of them catering to high-end travelers—a staggering amount of growth for a country the size of Maine. Economically and politically, Portugal finally feels back on solid ground.

For visitors just discovering the nation, the allure is clear. It’s easy to access—a mere seven hour flight from much of the Eastern seaboard—and unlike its northern neighbors, Portugal has year-round temperate weather, so there’s no such thing as a bad time to visit.The country remains relatively affordable, making it a magnet for those who want luxury without the sticker shock of Europe’s more well-trod capitals. There are one-of-a-kind hotels popping up everywhere, as well as a growing eco-tourism scene.

In this package celebrating Portugal’s abundant natural resources and rich heritage, we’ve pulled together everything you need to plan a trip there. For those that may have visited the country previously, we dug through the Time/Life photo archives for a look at how much the nation has changed in just the past few decades. And since nothing stokes wanderlust like a good photograph, we’ve also pulled together some visual inspiration: check out our collection of stunning images to help figure out where you want to start your travels. And whether you prefer to hit the road in search of food, wine, or adventure, we’ve got a checklist of can’t-miss experiences and attractions.

Regardless of your reason for traveling, no trip to Portugal is complete without a stop in Lisbon—most international flights go into the capital—so we’ve updated our Lisbon travel guide with the best places to eat, shops to visit, attractions to see, and bars to hang out in. And of course, you’ll need a great place to stay. There are five-star hotels like the Four Seasons Hotel Ritz Lisbon and the family-friendly Martinhal Lisbon Chiado Family Suites, but soccer fans will want to check out Cristiano Ronaldo’s new hotel, the Pestana CR7, which unsurprisingly has a subtle soccer theme throughout (though Ronaldo superfans should instead visit the outpost in the futbol giant’s island hometown of Funchal, Madeira). We’ve also highlighted Belem, a neighborhood just outside Lisbon—perfect for a day trip and home to the famous pasteis de Belem, also known as Portuguese egg tarts.

For those who prefer a more bucolic vacation experience, there’s plenty to see and do beyond the city limits of Lisbon. For beachcombers, the seaside town of Comporta, just a couple hours south of the capital on the Troia Peninsula. Once a sleepy fishing port, the area is now a magnet for Lisbon’s fashion crowd, but still has the uncrowded beaches and laid-back vibe that places like Ibiza and St. Tropez haven’t seen for decades. Stop for fresh seafood at one of the many roadside restaurants, or stay in style at one of the area’s pared-down luxury beach huts.

In the country’s northwest corner, the Douro Valley’s terraced vineyards draw in-the-know wine lovers, and are now even more approachable for travelers seeking a high-end getaway. Last year, the Douro Valley saw the opening of the first Six Senses in Europe (the wellness-focused brand is known for its incredibly designed properties, mostly in Asia and the Middle East, and its spa program). The property here leans in to the oenophile appeal, offering vinotherapy with wine-inspired treatments and an extensive library of bottles to choose from.

Follow the Douro River downstream and you’ll eventually wind up at another place made famous by wine: the oceanfront city of Porto, the namesake of port wine and a must-visit destination for design lovers. Portugal’s second largest city is only a three-hour drive (or an even shorter flight) from Lisbon, with an ambiance that’s more laid-back than the capital city but with no shortage of cosmopolitan attractions. There, you’ll find stunning Art Deco architecture, wonderful museums, and memorable design boutiques.

Even adrenaline junkies can find their dream vacation in Portugal. About 800 miles off the country’s Atlantic Coast, the nine tiny islands that make up the Azores archipelago are a bucket-list-worthy destination for adventure travelers. In addition to sailing, hiking, rock-climbing, surfing, and wildlife-spotting, the islands have a surprisingly stellar culinary tradition to help fuel your high-energy pursuits. Most Americans don’t realize the Azores are a mere four-hour flight from Boston, with daily direct flights from TAP that make this an ideal place to stop over on your way home—or just a long weekend.

There’s something for everyone in this little country—and there’s never been a better time to go.

Graphs by Mara Sofferin and Louie Mansour





14/07/2018

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Portugal – Algarve – Travel – Towns of Algarve, portugal travel.#Portugal

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Due to the importance of its position on the world map this province has been invaded and fought over by the Phoenicians, Romans and Moors. Closely associated with the sea throughout its history this was the base of the famous Henry the Navigator who, from the point at Sagres organized the successful 15th Century exploration of the New World.

The Algarve is composed of 5.411 square kilometres with approximately 420,000 (Year 2004) permanent inhabitants. This figure can swell to well over a million people in the height of the summer. The Algarve administrative centre is Faro with its control over 16 Municipalities, which in turn govern a total of 77 Parishes.

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14/07/2018

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Portugal Travel Guide

Whether you’re looking for a jam-packed city stopover in Lisbon or to spend a week village hopping along the coast, a visit to Portugal has much to offer the curious traveler. For wine enthusiasts seeking the road less traveled, a drive through the Douro Valley is a must. Beach bums can spend their vacation soaking up the summer sun in the South, while dining on fresh fish plucked straight from the clear blue waters of the Mediterranean. The old and the new collide in a mish-mash of culture and design on the streets and meeting squares, or pracas, of Lisbon. Flanked by the Douro River, the medieval capital of the north, Porto offers any history buff a plethora of sightseeing opportunities. Consult Travel and Leisure’s Portugal travel guide, to pack in the best of Portugal’s many delights.

Things Not to Miss in Portugal

• Visit the Santos neighborhood to brush shoulders with the capital’s hippest residents or play the tourist in Belem, Lisbon’s cultural epicenter.

• Grab a snack in the historic Pasteis de Belem and sample their famous custard tarts

• Take a streetcar up the winding streets of the Bairro Alto (or high neighborhood) and stop for a beer and some traditional Fado live music.

• Sip local Vino Porto from the Douro Valley

• Visit the 17th century Nicolau Nasoni built Clerigos Tower, and take in a panoramic view of the city.

• Visit the romantic manor homes in this mountain village of Sintra just north of Lisbon.

• See the crystal blue waters of the Algarve coast

When to Go to Portugal

Portugal boasts a Mediterranean climate year round, but the cooler months – November through February – are best avoided for those who seek the sunny weather. Rainfall peaks in March and April, but gives way to a glorious May. This is a great time to visit Portugal before the summer peak rates jump up.

Those who travel to Portugal from June through September can enjoy traditional festivals like the São João in Porto and the Santo António in Lisbon. Beach dwellers can rest easy on the coast with balmy 85-degree heat and a faint ocean breeze. Those who find the summer too hot should take in the sights in October when cities are cooler and less crowded.





14/07/2018

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Portugal Register Travel insurance Destinations

Last updated: November 29, 2017 11:00 ET

Still valid: December 3, 2017 15:09 ET

Latest updates: An editorial change was made.

Risk level(s)

Portugal – Take normal security precautions

Safety and security

Crime

Violent crimes toward tourists are rare in Portugal. Non-violent petty crimes, such as pickpocketing and bag snatching, however, are on the rise. The petty thieves are very skilled, and often work in groups. Be vigilant in public areas, all tourist attractions, beaches, restaurants, hotel lobbies, bus stations, train stations and airports.

In Lisbon, exercise caution at all train and underground stations, and particularly on electric trams numbered E28, to Castelo de S o Jorge; E25, to Prazeres; and E15, to Bel m.

Exercise caution when travelling to Queluz and Sintra, to visit the castles and palaces, as well as to the Costa da Caparica beach, south of Lisbon. If visiting the Estoril coast and the village of Cascais, be especially careful at Guincho Beach, Cabo da Roca and Boca do Inferno (Mouth of Hell).

In Porto, do not walk alone after dark, especially along the waterfront of the Douro River.

Do not let your guard down outside of the main cities, as thieves may be watching and can strike anywhere. Be especially careful in the Algarve region in such towns as Lagos and Albufeira, as well as in small coastal towns along and up to the north side of the country, such as Aljezur, Nazar , Ericeira and Peniche, where petty crimes have been reported.

If you are robbed, go to the nearest police station to report the crime and obtain a police report. There are tourist police stations in Lisbon, Porto, Portim o and Cascais.

Spiked food and drinks

Never leave your drinks unattended or in the care of strangers. Be wary of accepting snacks, beverages, gum or cigarettes from new acquaintances. Drugs may be present that could put you at risk of sexual assault and robbery.

Terrorism

There is a threat of terrorism in Europe. Terrorist attacks have occurred in a number of European cities and there is a potential for other violent incidents, which could target areas frequented by expatriates and foreign travellers. Continue to exercise normal security precautions.

Road safety

Rental cars and vehicles with foreign licence plates are frequently targeted for break-ins. Avoid leaving personal items and documents (especially passports) in plain sight in a vehicle.

If you experience car trouble, stop at a gas station or rest stop, if possible. If you must stop unexpectedly, be aware of your immediate surroundings and keep a careful watch on bystanders, including those who offer to help.

Be suspicious of anyone signalling you to stop on roads or highways. Thieves have been known to use this tactic to steal valuables, unattended bags and even the vehicle.

Incidents of thieves on motorcycles slashing rental car tires when the car is stopped at an intersection have been reported. This forces the vehicle to stop on the side of the road and allows for the thieves to approach and distract the passengers by offering assistance, while another steals belongings that are within reach. If this occurs, when possible, lock your doors and call your rental car agency or emergency services from within the car. Avoid opening your window, unlocking the car or stepping out of the vehicle. Official assistance and road monitoring vehicles are present on Portuguese highways and will come to your assistance. When possible, wait for the police to arrive.

Do not open the trunk before you finish parking when you arrive at your destination; this prevents thieves from knowing what is hidden in the trunk.

Whenever possible, use secure parking facilities, especially overnight. Do not leave your vehicle unattended and ensure that windows are closed and doors are locked at all times.

Excessive speeds, unpredictable driving habits and reckless motorcyclists create hazards. Be aware that slow-moving machinery may be found travelling on rural and national roads.

Public transportation

Local and inter-city train and bus services are good.

Taxis are widely available. Confirm the fare prior to getting into the taxi or ensure that the meter is used.

A ferry runs between the islands of Madeira and Porto Santo.

Air travel

We do not make assessments on the compliance of foreign domestic airlines with international safety standards.

A tourism information kiosk in the arrivals area of the Lisbon airport offers a wide range of tourism information, including expected taxi fares, and sells taxi vouchers at standardized prices for many locations in the city and metro area. Use a taxi from the queue or kiosk and do not accept rides from someone who approaches you.

Daily domestic flights link the mainland to the islands of the Azores, as well as to Madeira.

Demonstrations

Demonstrations occur frequently in larger urban centres and have the potential to suddenly turn violent. They can lead to significant disruptions to traffic and public transportation. Avoid all demonstrations, follow the advice of local authorities and monitor local media.

Beaches and water activities

While beaches are generally considered safe, do not leave your personal belongings unattended.

During the summer months, deaths by drowning have occurred on beaches and in swimming pools. Take warning flags on beaches seriously. The Portuguese Maritime Police have the authority to fine bathers who disobey the lifeguard s warning flags. Don t swim at beaches that link to/from rivers, as the water currents can be very strong. Don t dive into unknown water as hidden rocks or shallow depths can cause serious injury or death.

In the fall and winter months, be cautious when walking along beaches close to the water s edge because waves can be very unpredictable in size and may come onto shore further than expected and with strong undertows. Do not visit beaches or coastal areas during periods of severe weather warnings. Exercise caution and follow the advice of the local authorities.

Look out for signs warning of cliff erosion. Falling rocks are a hazard and authorities can fine those who ignore warning signs.

In marine areas, coral, jellyfish and other ocean life found along reefs can poison, sting or cause infection if touched or stepped on. Ask local authorities about the presence of such species and whether they are dangerous.

General safety information

You must carry identification at all times. Keep a photocopy of your passport in case of loss or seizure.

Exercise normal safety precautions. Ensure that your personal belongings and passport and other travel documents are secure at all times. Pay attention to your surroundings, avoid showing signs of affluence and do not carry large sums of cash. If possible, carry only the documents, cash and belongings you will need for the day, and leave all other items in a hotel safe.

Entry/exit requirements

Every country or territory decides who can enter or exit through its borders. The Government of Canada cannot intervene on your behalf if you do not meet your destination s entry or exit requirements.

We have obtained the information on this page from the Portuguese authorities. It can, however, change at any time.

Customs officials may ask you to show them a return ticket.

Upon entry into Portugal, non-European Union (EU) foreign nationals that will be staying in non-commercial accommodation and have transited through another Schengen country by air en route to Portugal must register their entry at any immigration office, or police station if entering by a land border, within three business days of arriving in the country.

Passport

Portugal is a Schengen area country. Upon arrival, Canadians are required to present a passport that must be valid for at least three months beyond the date of expected departure from the Schengen area. Prior to travelling, ask your transportation company about its requirements related to passport validity, which may be more stringent than the country’s entry rules.

Temporary passport holders may be subject to different entry requirements. Check with diplomatic representatives for up-to-date information.

Official (special and diplomatic) passport holders must consult the Official Travel page, as they may be subject to different entry requirements.

Visas

Tourist visa: Not required for stays up to 90 days*

Business visa: Not required for stays up 90 days*

Work visa: Required

Student visa: Required

* The 90-day period begins upon initial entry into any country of the Schengen area. Stays are cumulative and include visits to any Schengen area country within any 180-day period.

Schengen area

Canadian citizens do not need a visa for travel to countries within the Schengen area. However, visa-free travel only applies to stays of up to 90 days in any 180-day period. Stays are cumulative and include visits to any Schengen area country.

If you plan to stay in the Schengen area for a longer period of time, you will need a visa. You must contact the high commission or embassy of the country or countries you are travelling to and obtain the appropriate visa(s) prior to travel.





05/03/2018

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Portugal: Travel Leisure’s 2016 Destination of the Year, Travel Leisure, portugal

Why Portugal is Travel + Leisure’s 2016 Destination of the Year

The small European country captured our attention this year—economic growth and diversity of landscape were just a few reasons it was at the top of every traveler’s list. Read on to find out why Travel + Leisure has named Portugal its 2016 Destination of the Year.

Just a few years ago, Portugal’s future was looking dim. At the peak of Europe’s debt crisis, the country teetered on the edge of bankruptcy, its economy more crippled than it had been in almost 40 years. State funding for the arts was slashed; the Portuguese ministry of culture was so hard-hit by budget cuts it all but disappeared. In one painfully symptomatic moment, the government was inches away from auctioning off a collection of works by the Catalan artist Joan Miró to pay off state debts.

But in the wake of the crash, Portugal has managed to flourish anew. Austerity measures dried up government funding for cultural initiatives, so artists and entrepreneurs turned to their communities to drum up support. As buildings and factories closed, art collectives and locally run businesses opened up in their place, and the world slowly started to take note. In some small way, the crash may even have helped the nation’s tourism industry: The country remained markedly less expensive for travelers than most of its European neighbors, a contrast that’s particularly evident in Portugal’s resort towns and cultural capitals, which have seen a growing number of visitors in recent years.

When it’s time to choose our Destination of the Year, we here at Travel + Leisure look to the places that feel exciting, that warrant rediscovery, that have come into their own and stepped onto the international stage in some new way. In 2016, Portugal was a natural fit. As our editor, Nathan Lump, writes in the December issue, Portugal is “exhibiting a dynamism that feels fresh and distinctive.” The nation’s bounceback has long been underway, but the past couple of years seem to have been a turning point, and the data proves it. According to the Portugal News, foreign tourism to Portugal grew by a record-breaking 10 percent in 2015, and 2016 is expected to improve even further. U.S. travel to the country grew 22 percent in 2016, outpacing even the overall growth in international tourism. Flights have increased—you can now travel nonstop from eight U.S. cities—and this October, a 119 percent growth in North American bookings helped Portuguese airline TAP to achieve the best October in its 60-year history. More than 40 new hotels opened in 2016, most of them catering to high-end travelers—a staggering amount of growth for a country the size of Maine. Economically and politically, Portugal finally feels back on solid ground.

For visitors just discovering the nation, the allure is clear. It’s easy to access—a mere seven hour flight from much of the Eastern seaboard—and unlike its northern neighbors, Portugal has year-round temperate weather, so there’s no such thing as a bad time to visit.The country remains relatively affordable, making it a magnet for those who want luxury without the sticker shock of Europe’s more well-trod capitals. There are one-of-a-kind hotels popping up everywhere, as well as a growing eco-tourism scene.

In this package celebrating Portugal’s abundant natural resources and rich heritage, we’ve pulled together everything you need to plan a trip there. For those that may have visited the country previously, we dug through the Time/Life photo archives for a look at how much the nation has changed in just the past few decades. And since nothing stokes wanderlust like a good photograph, we’ve also pulled together some visual inspiration: check out our collection of stunning images to help figure out where you want to start your travels. And whether you prefer to hit the road in search of food, wine, or adventure, we’ve got a checklist of can’t-miss experiences and attractions.

Regardless of your reason for traveling, no trip to Portugal is complete without a stop in Lisbon—most international flights go into the capital—so we’ve updated our Lisbon travel guide with the best places to eat, shops to visit, attractions to see, and bars to hang out in. And of course, you’ll need a great place to stay. There are five-star hotels like the Four Seasons Hotel Ritz Lisbon and the family-friendly Martinhal Lisbon Chiado Family Suites, but soccer fans will want to check out Cristiano Ronaldo’s new hotel, the Pestana CR7, which unsurprisingly has a subtle soccer theme throughout (though Ronaldo superfans should instead visit the outpost in the futbol giant’s island hometown of Funchal, Madeira). We’ve also highlighted Belem, a neighborhood just outside Lisbon—perfect for a day trip and home to the famous pasteis de Belem, also known as Portuguese egg tarts.

For those who prefer a more bucolic vacation experience, there’s plenty to see and do beyond the city limits of Lisbon. For beachcombers, the seaside town of Comporta, just a couple hours south of the capital on the Troia Peninsula. Once a sleepy fishing port, the area is now a magnet for Lisbon’s fashion crowd, but still has the uncrowded beaches and laid-back vibe that places like Ibiza and St. Tropez haven’t seen for decades. Stop for fresh seafood at one of the many roadside restaurants, or stay in style at one of the area’s pared-down luxury beach huts.

In the country’s northwest corner, the Douro Valley’s terraced vineyards draw in-the-know wine lovers, and are now even more approachable for travelers seeking a high-end getaway. Last year, the Douro Valley saw the opening of the first Six Senses in Europe (the wellness-focused brand is known for its incredibly designed properties, mostly in Asia and the Middle East, and its spa program). The property here leans in to the oenophile appeal, offering vinotherapy with wine-inspired treatments and an extensive library of bottles to choose from.

Follow the Douro River downstream and you’ll eventually wind up at another place made famous by wine: the oceanfront city of Porto, the namesake of port wine and a must-visit destination for design lovers. Portugal’s second largest city is only a three-hour drive (or an even shorter flight) from Lisbon, with an ambiance that’s more laid-back than the capital city but with no shortage of cosmopolitan attractions. There, you’ll find stunning Art Deco architecture, wonderful museums, and memorable design boutiques.

Even adrenaline junkies can find their dream vacation in Portugal. About 800 miles off the country’s Atlantic Coast, the nine tiny islands that make up the Azores archipelago are a bucket-list-worthy destination for adventure travelers. In addition to sailing, hiking, rock-climbing, surfing, and wildlife-spotting, the islands have a surprisingly stellar culinary tradition to help fuel your high-energy pursuits. Most Americans don’t realize the Azores are a mere four-hour flight from Boston, with daily direct flights from TAP that make this an ideal place to stop over on your way home—or just a long weekend.

There’s something for everyone in this little country—and there’s never been a better time to go.

Graphs by Mara Sofferin and Louie Mansour





05/03/2018

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Portugal

Top 10: the best five-star hotels in Lisbon

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EXPERT GUIDE TO PORTUGAL

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05/03/2018

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Portugal travel, portugal travel.#Portugal #travel

Portugal

Top 10: the best five-star hotels in Lisbon

Portugal travel

EXPERT GUIDE TO PORTUGAL

Algarve nightlife

Algarve drives

Algarve restaurants

Make the world your own.

The Best Hotels in Portugal

Portugal travel

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8 Telegraph expert rating

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Verride Palácio Santa Catarina

8 Telegraph expert rating

Portugal travel

Vila Joya

9 Telegraph expert rating

Belmond Reid s Palace

9 Telegraph expert rating

More articles

Top 10: the best hotels in Lisbon city-centre

The best Lisbon airport hotels

Top 10: the best boutique hotels in Lisbon

Europe s best beach holiday hotels for summer

19 reasons why Lisbon should be your next city break

The 10 best beaches for children in Europe

The top 5 cultural holidays in Portugal for 2017

The top 5 villa holidays in Portugal for 2017

The top 5 beach holidays in Portugal for 2017

The ultimate holiday villa and cottage guide for families

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Why you should take a ski holiday in the Bernese Oberland this winter

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Telegraph Media Group Limited 2017

Portugal travel

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14/01/2018

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Portugal travelAlbufeira

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Portugal travelAlvor

Portugal travelArmaзгo de Pera

Portugal travelCarvoeiro

Portugal travelFaro

Portugal travelLagoa

Portugal travelLagos

Portugal travelLoulй

Portugal travelMonchique

Portugal travelOlhгo

Portugal travelPortimгo

Portugal travelPraia da Luz

Portugal travelQuarteira

Portugal travelQuinta do Lago

Portugal travelSagres

Portugal travelSilves

Portugal travelTavira

Portugal travelVale do Lobo

Portugal travelVilamoura

Portugal travelVila Real de Santo Antуnio

Portugal travelGeneral Index

Portugal travelGuest Manor Houses

Portugal travelHoliday Apartments

Portugal travelHoliday Rentals

Portugal travelHoliday Resorts

Portugal travelHotels

Portugal travelHotels Spa

Portugal travelInns

Portugal travel Luxury Hotels

Portugal travelPousadas

Portugal travelAccommodation

Portugal travelCommerce

Portugal travelEntertainment

Portugal travelFaro Airport Transfers

Portugal travelProperty

Portugal travelSports

Portugal travelVehicle Hire

Portugal travelPortugal – Home

Portugal travel Sunny Algarve Transfers

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Portugal travel Distances between each Tourist Town in Kms.

Portugal travel Algarve – History

Due to the importance of its position on the world map this province has been invaded and fought over by the Phoenicians, Romans and Moors. Closely associated with the sea throughout its history this was the base of the famous Henry the Navigator who, from the point at Sagres organized the successful 15th Century exploration of the New World.

The Algarve is composed of 5.411 square kilometres with approximately 420,000 (Year 2004) permanent inhabitants. This figure can swell to well over a million people in the height of the summer. The Algarve administrative centre is Faro with its control over 16 Municipalities, which in turn govern a total of 77 Parishes.

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14/01/2018

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Portugal: Travel Leisure’s 2016 Destination of the Year, Travel Leisure, portugal

Why Portugal is Travel + Leisure’s 2016 Destination of the Year

The small European country captured our attention this year—economic growth and diversity of landscape were just a few reasons it was at the top of every traveler’s list. Read on to find out why Travel + Leisure has named Portugal its 2016 Destination of the Year.

Just a few years ago, Portugal’s future was looking dim. At the peak of Europe’s debt crisis, the country teetered on the edge of bankruptcy, its economy more crippled than it had been in almost 40 years. State funding for the arts was slashed; the Portuguese ministry of culture was so hard-hit by budget cuts it all but disappeared. In one painfully symptomatic moment, the government was inches away from auctioning off a collection of works by the Catalan artist Joan Miró to pay off state debts.

But in the wake of the crash, Portugal has managed to flourish anew. Austerity measures dried up government funding for cultural initiatives, so artists and entrepreneurs turned to their communities to drum up support. As buildings and factories closed, art collectives and locally run businesses opened up in their place, and the world slowly started to take note. In some small way, the crash may even have helped the nation’s tourism industry: The country remained markedly less expensive for travelers than most of its European neighbors, a contrast that’s particularly evident in Portugal’s resort towns and cultural capitals, which have seen a growing number of visitors in recent years.

When it’s time to choose our Destination of the Year, we here at Travel + Leisure look to the places that feel exciting, that warrant rediscovery, that have come into their own and stepped onto the international stage in some new way. In 2016, Portugal was a natural fit. As our editor, Nathan Lump, writes in the December issue, Portugal is “exhibiting a dynamism that feels fresh and distinctive.” The nation’s bounceback has long been underway, but the past couple of years seem to have been a turning point, and the data proves it. According to the Portugal News, foreign tourism to Portugal grew by a record-breaking 10 percent in 2015, and 2016 is expected to improve even further. U.S. travel to the country grew 22 percent in 2016, outpacing even the overall growth in international tourism. Flights have increased—you can now travel nonstop from eight U.S. cities—and this October, a 119 percent growth in North American bookings helped Portuguese airline TAP to achieve the best October in its 60-year history. More than 40 new hotels opened in 2016, most of them catering to high-end travelers—a staggering amount of growth for a country the size of Maine. Economically and politically, Portugal finally feels back on solid ground.

For visitors just discovering the nation, the allure is clear. It’s easy to access—a mere seven hour flight from much of the Eastern seaboard—and unlike its northern neighbors, Portugal has year-round temperate weather, so there’s no such thing as a bad time to visit.The country remains relatively affordable, making it a magnet for those who want luxury without the sticker shock of Europe’s more well-trod capitals. There are one-of-a-kind hotels popping up everywhere, as well as a growing eco-tourism scene.

In this package celebrating Portugal’s abundant natural resources and rich heritage, we’ve pulled together everything you need to plan a trip there. For those that may have visited the country previously, we dug through the Time/Life photo archives for a look at how much the nation has changed in just the past few decades. And since nothing stokes wanderlust like a good photograph, we’ve also pulled together some visual inspiration: check out our collection of stunning images to help figure out where you want to start your travels. And whether you prefer to hit the road in search of food, wine, or adventure, we’ve got a checklist of can’t-miss experiences and attractions.

Regardless of your reason for traveling, no trip to Portugal is complete without a stop in Lisbon—most international flights go into the capital—so we’ve updated our Lisbon travel guide with the best places to eat, shops to visit, attractions to see, and bars to hang out in. And of course, you’ll need a great place to stay. There are five-star hotels like the Four Seasons Hotel Ritz Lisbon and the family-friendly Martinhal Lisbon Chiado Family Suites, but soccer fans will want to check out Cristiano Ronaldo’s new hotel, the Pestana CR7, which unsurprisingly has a subtle soccer theme throughout (though Ronaldo superfans should instead visit the outpost in the futbol giant’s island hometown of Funchal, Madeira). We’ve also highlighted Belem, a neighborhood just outside Lisbon—perfect for a day trip and home to the famous pasteis de Belem, also known as Portuguese egg tarts.

For those who prefer a more bucolic vacation experience, there’s plenty to see and do beyond the city limits of Lisbon. For beachcombers, the seaside town of Comporta, just a couple hours south of the capital on the Troia Peninsula. Once a sleepy fishing port, the area is now a magnet for Lisbon’s fashion crowd, but still has the uncrowded beaches and laid-back vibe that places like Ibiza and St. Tropez haven’t seen for decades. Stop for fresh seafood at one of the many roadside restaurants, or stay in style at one of the area’s pared-down luxury beach huts.

In the country’s northwest corner, the Douro Valley’s terraced vineyards draw in-the-know wine lovers, and are now even more approachable for travelers seeking a high-end getaway. Last year, the Douro Valley saw the opening of the first Six Senses in Europe (the wellness-focused brand is known for its incredibly designed properties, mostly in Asia and the Middle East, and its spa program). The property here leans in to the oenophile appeal, offering vinotherapy with wine-inspired treatments and an extensive library of bottles to choose from.

Follow the Douro River downstream and you’ll eventually wind up at another place made famous by wine: the oceanfront city of Porto, the namesake of port wine and a must-visit destination for design lovers. Portugal’s second largest city is only a three-hour drive (or an even shorter flight) from Lisbon, with an ambiance that’s more laid-back than the capital city but with no shortage of cosmopolitan attractions. There, you’ll find stunning Art Deco architecture, wonderful museums, and memorable design boutiques.

Even adrenaline junkies can find their dream vacation in Portugal. About 800 miles off the country’s Atlantic Coast, the nine tiny islands that make up the Azores archipelago are a bucket-list-worthy destination for adventure travelers. In addition to sailing, hiking, rock-climbing, surfing, and wildlife-spotting, the islands have a surprisingly stellar culinary tradition to help fuel your high-energy pursuits. Most Americans don’t realize the Azores are a mere four-hour flight from Boston, with daily direct flights from TAP that make this an ideal place to stop over on your way home—or just a long weekend.

There’s something for everyone in this little country—and there’s never been a better time to go.

Graphs by Mara Sofferin and Louie Mansour





14/01/2018

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Termas Portuguesas, Portugal Hotel & Travel Guide, Maisturismo, portugal travel.#Portugal #travel

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Portugal travel

MAISTURISMO EDIÇÕES E PUBLICIDADE, S.A.

Rua General Ferreira Martins, 10 – 2Вє A – EdifГ­cio Fernando Pessoa – 1495-137 AlgГ©s – Portugal

Tel.: (+351) 213 190 210

FOUNDER: Maria Helena BarГЈo

VICE-PRESIDENT / COMMERCIAL MANAGER: JosГ© Pedro Costa | [email protected]

WEB-MASTERING: KIMUS.NET – Web Solutions | [email protected]

The publisher is not liable for any changes made to the material or for any material provided by third parties.

Portugal travel

Established in 1985, Maisturismo is one of Portugal’s leading travelpublishing companies.

We are best known for the annual Portugal Hotel Guide, number one in the market and available here on the Internet and CD-ROM in six languages and as a glossy full-colour A4 directory. It contains details of over 2,000 accommodation units located in Portugal, including the Atlantic islands of Madeira and the Azores.

Due to a distribution agreement signed with the Portuguese tourist board (Turismo de Portugal), Maisturismo’s main publications are delivered free of charge to travel agents, tour operators and other travel trade executives all over the world. As part of this agreement, they are also freely distributed from the Portugal stand at all the main international travel trade fairs such as World Travel Market in London and ITB in Berlin.

Adopted by the Portuguese Hotel Industry Association (AHP) as its ocial source of information, the Portugal Hotel Guide is one of the most concise and accurate directories of its kind. Maisturismo also publishes the Portugal Meeting Guide, an annual publication dedicated to the meetings, incentives, congresses and events sector in Portugal. Unique in the market, it is also available on CD-ROM and on the Internet in six languages and provides clear and concise information about the country’s wide-ranging conference and exhibition facilities, making it an essential working tool for the international meetings industry.

Additionally, the company’s webzine, the Portugal Travel Guide, is another useful source of maps, photographs and the best tips on what to see and do while visiting Portugal.

Portugal travel

Rua General Ferreira Martins, 10 – 2Вє A

EdifГ­cio Fernando Pessoa

1495-137 AlgГ©s – Portugal

Tel.: (+351) 213 190 210

Fax: (+351) 213 525 144

Portugal travel





14/01/2018

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Portugal

Summary

Summary – there have been some large forest fires in central and northern Portugal this summer that have claimed lives. There has been very little rainfall this autumn and while the weather remains dry, there is always a risk of forest fires; you should check the situation with the local authorities if you’re considering travelling through woodland areas

The airline and tour operator Monarch went into administration on 2 October 2017; the repatriation flights for non-ATOL protected passengers have now ceased. You can find information and advice on flights, accommodation and reimbursement for expenses incurred on the dedicated website, or by calling the hotline on 0300 303 2800 (if calling from the UK) or +44 1753 330 330 (if calling from outside the UK).

If you need consular assistance above and beyond information on replacement flights or accommodation, please contact your nearest British embassy or consulate.

There have been some large forest fires in central and northern Portugal this summer that have claimed lives. There has been very little rainfall this autumn and while the weather remains dry, there is always a risk of forest fires. Check the situation with the local civil protection authority if you’re considering travelling through woodland areas. Report any fires immediately to the emergency services on 112. See Natural disasters

There have been reports of an increase in holidaymakers being encouraged to submit a claim for personal injury if they have experienced gastric illness during their stay. You can find more information about the action you can take if you have suffered a personal injury on the Citizens Advice website. You should only consider pursuing a complaint or claim if you have genuinely suffered from injury or illness. If you make a false or fraudulent claim, you may face legal proceedings in the UK or Portugal.

Around 2.6 million British nationals visited Portugal in 2015. Most visits are trouble-free.

Beware of street crime. Thieves tend to target money and passports so don’t keep them all in one place. See Crime

Walking the levadas (ancient irrigation channels) is a popular activity in Madeira, but the walks can be challenging if you are inexperienced. See Local travel – Madeira

Terrorist attacks in Portugal can’t be ruled out. See Terrorism

You can contact the emergency services by calling 112.

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission.

The Overseas Business Risk service offers information and advice for British companies operating overseas on how to manage political, economic, and business security-related risks.

Take out comprehensive travel and medical insurance and get a free European Health Insurance Card before you travel. See Health





14/01/2018

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Contents

Portugal shares the Iberian peninsula at the south-western tip of Europe with Spain. Geographically and culturally somewhat isolated from its neighbour, Portugal has a rich, unique culture, lively cities and beautiful countryside. Although it was once one of the poorest countries in Western Europe, the end of dictatorship and introduction of Democracy in 1974, as well as its incorporation into the European Union in 1986, has meant significantly increased prosperity. It may now be one of the best value destinations on the Continent. This is because the country offers outstanding landscape diversity, due to its North-South disposition along the western shore of the Iberian peninsula. You can travel in a single day from green mountains in the North, covered with vines and all varieties of trees to rocky mountains, with spectacular slopes and falls in the Centre, to a near-desert landscape in the Alentejo region and finally to the glamorous beach holidays destination Algarve. The climate, combined with investments in the golfing infrastructure in recent years, has also turned the country into a golfing haven. Portugal was recently named “Best Golf Destination 2008” by readers of Golfers Today, a British publication. Fourteen of Portugal’s courses are rated in the top 100 best in Europe. If you want a condensed view of European landscapes, culture and way of life, Portugal might very well fit the bill.

Understand [ edit ]

Portugal is 900 years old, and even though it has a relatively small area, it played a crucial role in world history. As of today, it is the oldest country in Europe with the same borders. During the 15th and 16th centuries Portugal started a major chapter in world history with the New World Discoveries (“Descobrimentos”). It established a sea route to India, and colonized areas in Africa (Angola, Mozambique, Cape Verde. ), South America (Brazil), Asia (Macau. ), and Oceania (East-Timor. ) creating an empire. The Portuguese language continues to be the biggest connection between these countries.

In 1910, the Republic was established, abolishing the monarchy. However, this Republic was fragile and a military dictatorship was implemented, which lasted for 46 years, plunging the country into a marked stagnation. In 1974, Portugal became a free democracy, and in 1986 it joined the current European Union, quickly approaching European standards of development.

Climate [ edit ]

Portugal is one of the warmest European countries. In mainland Portugal, yearly temperature averages are about 15°C (55°F) in the north and 18°C (64°F) in the south. Madeira and Azores have a narrower temperature range as expected given their insularity, with the former having low precipitation in most of the archipelago and the latter being wet and rainy. Spring and Summer months are usually sunny and temperature maximum are very high during July and August, with maximums averaging between 35°C and 40°C (86°F – 95°F) in the interior of the country, 30°C and 35°C in the north. Autumn and Winter are typically rainy and windy, yet sunny days are not rare either. Temperatures rarely fall below 5°C (41°F) nearer to the sea, averaging 10°C (50°F), but can reach several degrees below 0°C (32°F) further inland. Snow is common in winter in the mountainous areas of the north, especially in Serra da Estrela but melts quickly once the season is over. Portugal’s climate can be classified as Mediterranean (particularly the southern parts of the Algarve and Alentejo, though technically on Atlantic shore).

Time zone [ edit ]

Portugal is regulated by the Western European Time Zone (WET), the same time as in the United Kingdom and Ireland.





04/12/2017

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Cheap flights to Portugal #travels

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Cheap flights to Portugal

Roaring resorts, picturesque beaches, idyllic cliffs with staggering views, that s what Portugal has to offer, right? Of course you re right, but take a look inside any Portugal travel guide and you ll see you re barely scratching the surface.

Portugal is home to all these things and more, and offers an Aladdin s cave of lesser-known wonders that will captivate you and leave you counting the days until your next holiday. For those looking for some Portugal travel tips we recommend taking a short trip away from the hubbub of the tourist centres where you ll discover medieval castles, hillside villages, hidden coastline coves and meadows full of flowers. And that s not mentioning the World Heritage towns like Sintra and Evora, with their mind-blowing historic architecture enough to keep even the most enthusiastic of culture vultures entertained. But it s with its charming cities that Portugal really beats the competition. The stylish cities of Lisbon and Porto wow the crowds with their medieval alleys, Baroque churches and Neoclassical squares during the day, only to put on a party to remember at night.

Of course, for those who like to mix their dancing with a bit of sand and sea there s always the Algarve with its mile after mile of pristine beaches. Take a flight to Faro and choose between the multitudes of family-friendly beach resorts that dot Portugal s southern coast. Whether you re after a pint of good old Newcastle Brown Ale, or a cold glass of Vinho Verde you re sure to find something that suits your taste in the Algarve. And then, of course, for those who want to get away completely there is always the paradise island of Madeira with its outstanding natural beauty, world-class resorts and year-round good weather. Fancy a winter holiday anyone?

Whatever your reason to get away, Portugal won t disappoint. Great days out in the sun, or walks in the mountains; all night parties in the capital or boozy afternoons on the coast of the Algarve, there s a lot more to Portugal than you think. If you need some travel advice, the best available is to go and see it for yourself!

Portugal weather

Portugal s weather is one of its main attractions with the sun showing its face for much of the year. If it s a sunny break you re after, then you can t get much better than Portugal. Its hottest season extends from mid-June to mid-September when you ll find average temperatures around a pleasant 28 degrees. The climate in Portugal is hottest in July and August when average temperatures in the Algarve can reach the mid-30s. But if the heat just isn t your thing then you may be more suited to Portugal s spring climate. And with weather temperatures in the south staying around a mild 17 degrees during winter, why not enjoy Portugal when the crowds have gone and the hotels are cheap?





03/09/2017

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Portugal Travel Tips

Portugal has been popular with European vacationers for years, and it’s easy to see why. The country is blessed with excellent sandy beaches and rugged coastline, as well as cosmopolitan and architecturally-stunning cities. Throw in great food, lots of wine, and cheap prices, and it makes for a perfect holiday spot. Because it is on the tip of Europe and isn t as centrally-connected as other countries, not a lot of people visit. Fewer crowds mean a better experience. I fell in love with Portugal when I went and I can t wait to get back. It s a very underrated country.

Destination Guides for Portugal

Typical Costs

Accommodation Overall, you ll find accommodation very affordable in Portugal, especially if you are staying in hostels. Most dorm rooms cost around 15 EUR per night (sometimes as low as 10 EUR). Double rooms with a private bathroom cost around 50 EUR in a hostel. A double room in a hotel begins at 40 EUR for a cheap, two star hotel.

Food You can find snacks in bakeries for around 2 EUR, light meals and sandwiches for around 7 EUR, and fast food for around the the same price. If you want sit-down meal with drinks, you re looking at spending closer to around 18 EUR per a meal. After that, the skies the limit. However, that being said, you can find some great bargains. I once had a full meal with wine for 13 EUR! If you re cooking, groceries will cost around 36 EUR for a week s worth of food.

Transportation A city metro ticket will generally start from 1.50 EUR. Inter-country trains and buses are inexpensive. For example, the train between Porto and Lisbon is starts at only 24 EUR. A taxi in one of Portugal’s cities should cost no more than 12 EUR.

Activities Activities are not that expensive in Portugal. Museums and UNESCO sites charge about 6-11 EUR entrance fees. Wine tours are about 50 EUR for a whole day tour.

Money Saving Tips

For the most part, Portugal is an incredibly affordable destination. Food, accommodation, wine it s all very cheap, especially when compared to other EU countries. As long as you re not splurging on a ton of booze or eating at the overpriced tourist restaurants, you ll find it easy to save big while still enjoying yourself.

Free museum visits Most museums are free on Sundays.

Skip the taxis Taxis are super expensive in Portugal, often adding fees for luggage and airport pick ups. Simply use the metro or bus system to go where you need to.

Top Things to See and Do

Be amazed by Lisbon Portugal’s capital is a gem of a city. It s a city I instantly fell in love with when I visited. It s got mystique, history, beautiful and friendly locals, and great food. It is compact so it is easier than other cities walk around. Take a trip to the Castle of St Jorge. Explore the churches. Listen to Fado. Enjoy Lisbon. I came for a few days and spent a week.

Visit Batalha Built in 1388 and protected as a World Heritage Monument, Batalha is one of Europe s greatest Gothic masterpieces and is a popular day trip from Lisbon. On walking through the gigantic and impressive gothic doorway, you ll see that the interior of the church features 16th-century stained-glass windows. The building has seven chapels that are unfinished and therefore roofless.

Wander the Abbey of Santa Maria The Abbey of Santa Maria is Europe’s largest building of the Cistercian order. You can wander around the abbey at your leisure and find out more about the different parts of the building: its five cloisters, seven dormitories, a library, and huge kitchen.

Journey to Evora Another one of Portugal’s World Heritage sites is Evora, a small town that offers an array of beautiful and historic buildings. Its most famous landmark is the Temple of Diana but there is also the Praça do Giraldo, the town’s main square. This is small-town Portugal at its best.

Kick back on the Azores islands These nine islands lie about 930 miles from Lisbon (a two-hour flight) in the Atlantic Ocean. Each of the islands offer a peaceful and slow-paced way of life, unique wildlife, and stunning beaches. These islands are very off the beaten track and a good out of the way place to go.

See the Religious Monuments in Braga The beautiful city of Braga provides many Baroque monuments, including one of the country s best-known sights, the Bom Jesus Sanctuary. The old and the new city are connected by the main square, Praça da Republica. The city’s cathedral is also very much worth a visit, as it is the country’s oldest!

Party in Lagos Lagos, a small town on the Algarve is the place people go to party rather than see historic sites or sit in pretty squares. It is an excellent place to soak up the sun and truly relax on the beaches and then go out for dinner and on to a bar. During the summer months, this is one of Europe s premier party destinations with young travelers coming here to take part in bar crawls that last until the morning.

Head to Sintra Lord Byron, writing in the 18th century, said that the town was perhaps in every respect the most delightful in Europe. If you are visiting Lisbon you should definitely make an effort to come here with its palaces, wonderful views, and museum collections.

Sample Port in Porto Porto is where the world famous port wine orginates so take the opportunity to visit Cais De Gaia’s port wine cellars as well as taking in some of the cities beautiful architecture by renowned architects before taking a stroll along the port to admire the boats. For even more wine, visit the surrounding Duoro Valley and its many vineyard. I spent a boozy week traveling through the region.

Learn about the Knights Templar in Tomar The big attraction in the town of Tomar is the Templar Castle and Convent of Christ on the hill. It was the headquarters for the Knights Templar in the 12th century and contains one of the country’s most impressive monuments, the Convent of Christ.

Get in your watersports   Aveiro, around 45 miles south of Porto, lies on what s known as the silver coast. This is a small university town, and part of the historic center is built on canals, giving rise to the name the Venice of Portugal. The winds here create good opportunities for windsurfing and surfing.

Lose yourself in Coimbra   Another university city, Coimbra is home to the world s ninth-oldest campus. There is a famous, beautiful old library that you can tour, but the real thing to do in Coimbra is just to wander through the many old streets. There are many churches and gardens to visit. Tuesdays and Thursdays are the student party nights here.

Attend a Fado Performance   Whether in Lisbon or somewhere else, you shouldn t leave Portugal without getting a sense of the country s musical culture. Fado is a very important Portuguese tradition, with at least 200 years of history. It s very haunting and emotional music, sung by an individual. Most of the songs follow a theme of loss and mourning. Performances normally take place in restaurants during dinner.

Check out Faro   Faro is a common starting point for tours of the Algarve region, which is an area full of great beaches, seafood, and plenty of tourists. Faro itself isn t a beach city, but has a lovely old town and is a great place to spend a day before you hit the real resort areas.

Stand at the edge of Europe Cape Sagres is the most southwestern point on the European continent. It was here that Henry the Navigator had his famous navigation school, which gave birth to the careers of some of the most famous explorers in history.





23/08/2017

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Entry requirements

Going to Portugal

Airlines

International commercial airports are: Lisbon (LIS), Porto (OPO), Faro (FAO), Funchal (FNC) (Madeira island), Ponta Delgada (PDL) (Azores islands), and Lajes (TER) (Terceira, Azores islands). The national Portuguese airlines are TAP-Air Portugal and SATA. SATA also connects all nine Azores islands. There are also air links between Funchal (Madeira) and Porto Santo (Madeira). Portugalia airlines operate scheduled flights to and from Portugal in Europe.

Train

International trains run between Paris and Lisbon (Sud Express); Lisbon-Madrid (Lusitânia Train), and Porto-Vigo.

Regional lanes are operated by Comboios de Portugal (CP). Express trains connect Lisbon with the Norht and South via the Alfa Pendular ran by CP.

Customs

Residents or non-residents who leave or enter Portugal territory are free to take with them national and foreign currency in coins and notes, travelers checks and other securities intended to pay for the travel expenses, but are obligated to inform the customs authorities if the values involved exceed 12,000 Euros (approximately US$13,000.00).

Travelers over 17 years old, may bring in the following items, duty free: 2 bottles of table wine, 1 bottle of hard liquor, 200 cigarettes or 250 grams of tobacco, 1.75 ounces of perfume, and small quantities of tea or coffee for personal use. Bringing fresh meat into Portugal is forbidden. For further information, contact the Embassy Services or the Portuguese Consulates.

Time

Continental Portugal and Madeira Island are on Greenwich time five hours ahead of Eastern Time USA and eight ahead of Pacific Time USA. The Azores Islands  are GMT-1, one hour behind the Portuguese mainland. Daylight savings time begins the last Sunday in March (clocks are turned one hour ahead) and ends the last Sunday in October (clocks go back one hour).

Climate

Weather in coastal Portugal is mild year round with Mediterranean average temperatures. Summers are dry and clear, with warm sunshine extending long into Autumn. Winters are moderately cool and are the rainiest time of year, except in subtropical Madeira, where there is little rain. Mid-Summer temperatures range in the 70 s °F, while Winter temperatures range from the low to mid-50 s.

Weather in the interior can reach negative temperatures in the winter and snow is abundant in the middle-east and middle-north part of the country.

Getting Around

Urban public transport in the main towns, there is a complete public transport network. In Lisboa there are buses, the underground, and trams. One may also use public elevators (lifts). Tourism Information Centers at Carris (Lisboa) and STCP (Porto) sell tourist tickets every business day from 8 am to 8 pm.

Taxis are painted mostly cream with a roof-light to identify them. However, there are still some taxis which keep the old colors, green and black. In towns, they use taximeters, but once outside urban boundaries the service is charged by the kilometer, and includes the price of the driver s return trip to his starting point. From 10 pm to 6 am, the rate increases by 20%. It is normal to give a tip of 10% on top of the fare. Luggage is charged according to a fixed rate. All taxis have an updated chart in two languages.

Express trains run between Lisbon and Porto stopping in Coimbra (Alfa trains), while regional trains (Inter-cidades and Inter-regional) connect the different parts of Portugal. These trains have first and second class carriages, except for local and suburban trains, where there is only one class. Special tickets are available, including tourist tickets valid for 7, 14 or 21 days. There are special return ticket discounts on blue days for trips exceeding 100 km.

Business Hours

Banks are open from 8:30 am to 3 pm on Monday to Friday and are closed on bank holidays. Shops are open from 9 am to 1 pm and from 3 pm to 7 pm (working days). On Saturdays, most shops close at 1 pm. In the shopping malls located in larger towns, shops are normally open 7 days a week and on holidays from 10 am to 11 pm.

Museums open from 10 am to 12:30 am and from 2 pm to 5 pm. Closed on Mondays. Some palaces also close on Wednesdays.

Pharmacies open from 9 am to 1 pm and from 3 pm to 7 pm, Monday to Friday, and Saturday mornings. There are also 24 hour pharmacies which operate according to an official chart displayed on Pharmacy windows.





23/08/2017

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Portugal Travel Coverage – The New York Times #smithsonian #travel

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Restaurant Report: Bastardo in Lisbon

The best dishes from the chef, Luis Miguel Rodrigues, are grounded in traditional cuisine, with only subtle twists.

Restaurant Report: Cantina 32

At a friendly bistro on the pedestrian Rua das Flores, there are two rules: do not refuse the bread, and order the cheesecake.

10 Hotels in Europe That Make You Feel at Home

More than just places to rest your head, these properties in Paris, Vienna and other cities offer a sense of community.

36 Hours in Lisbon

From old townhouses filled with chic shops to docklands harboring night clubs, the city is undergoing a remarkable rebirth.

In Portugal, a Land Finely Aged Like Wine

A road trip through the whitewashed villages of the Alentejo, the southern Portuguese wine country.

Restaurant Report: Mini Bar in Lisbon

Avant-garde cooking is served at gentle prices at the latest venture from the prolific young chef José Avillez.

Sweet Dreams in Seven Heavenly European Inns

Hop from the coast of England to an island in Germany to an olive orchard in Italy, exploring a suite of moderately priced properties.

Outside Lisbon, a Verdant World of Castles and Palaces

Sintra, about 20 miles west of the capital, is one of Portugal’s crown jewels.

Finding a Global Groove in Lisbon

A spin around the city’s music scene reveals far more than fado, from indie jazz to African beats to American retro rock.





23/08/2017

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Portugal – Lonely Planet #airline #tickets

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Introducing Portugal

Medieval castles, cobblestone villages, captivating cities and golden beaches: the Portugal experience can be many things. History, great food and idyllic scenery are just the beginning…

Why I Love Portugal

By Regis St Louis, Writer

Portugal is full of surprises and I never tire of exploring this small but endlessly fascinating country. I’m enamoured by the scenery, the old-fashioned traditions of village life and Portugal’s outstanding, very affordable seafood. I love taking in the stunning views along the coast, going for mountain treks and bumping into shepherds in the Serra da Estrela, and wandering the pretty towns of the Minho .

Ghosts of the Past

Celts, Romans, Visigoths, Moors and Christians all left their mark on the Iberian nation. Here, you can gaze upon 20,000-year-old stone carvings in the Vila Nova de Foz Côa, watch the sunset over mysterious megaliths outside Évora or lose yourself in the elaborate corridors of Unesco World Heritage Sites in Tomar. Belém, Alcobaça or Batalha. You can pack an itinerary visiting palaces set above mist-covered woodlands, craggy clifftop castles and stunningly preserved medieval town centres.

Rhythms of Portugal

Festivals pack Portugal’s calendar. Drink, dance and feast your way through all-night revelries like Lisbon’s Festa de Santo António or Porto’s Festa de São João. There are kick-up-your-heels country fairs in the hinterlands, and rock- and world-music fests all along the coast. Any time of year is right to hear the mournful music of fado in the Alfama. join the dance party in Bairro Alto or hit the bars in Porto. Coimbra and Lagos.

Cinematic Scenery

Outside the cities, Portugal’s beauty unfolds in all its startling variety. You can go hiking amid the granite peaks of Parque Nacional da Peneda-Gerês or take in the pristine scenery and historic villages of the little-explored Beiras. Over 800km of coast offer more places to soak up the splendour. Gaze out over dramatic end-of-the-world cliffs, surf stellar breaks off dune-covered beaches or laze peacefully on sandy islands fronting calm blue seas. You’ll find dolphin-watching in the lush Sado Estuary, boating and kayaking along the meandering Rio Guadiana and memorable walks and bike rides all across the country.

The Portuguese Table

Freshly baked bread, olives, cheese, red wine or crisp vinho verde, chargrilled fish, cataplana (seafood stew), smoked meats – the Portuguese have perfected the art of cooking simple, delicious meals. Sitting down to table means experiencing the richness of Portugal’s bountiful coastline and fertile countryside. Of course, you don’t have to sit, you can take your piping-hot pastel de nata (custard tart) standing up at an 1837 patisserie in Belém, or wander through scenic vineyards sipping the velvety ports of the Douro valley. You can shop the produce-filled markets, or book a table in one of the country’s top dining rooms.





21/07/2017

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Portugal Travel Guide – Travel to Portugal #flight #and #hotel #deals

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Portugal Travel Guide – Travel to Portugal

Lisbon is perhaps Europe�s most pleasant and affordable city. Its fantastic architecture, diverse population, delicious seafood, intriguing tile-work and non-stop night-life bring together the best elements of Portuguese life. Don�t miss an evening bar-hopping in the Bairro Alto listening to contemporany hip music and Portuguese blues-fado!

Places to see

Tour beautifully restored towns and well-preserved architecture of UNESCO�s World Heritage sites in Evora. Batalha and Alcoba�a. If you are interested in monuments, Evora and Coimbra are must-sees.

The most beautiful natural areas lie in the Minho. Lima, and Douro valley. You can explore the verdant beauty and rural customs of the Minho Valley, or check out the spectacular gorge in the Douro valley.

The city of Oporto is located at the end of the Douro Valley, on the sea, and is famous for its port wine. It is an excellent base for exploring the region.

Enjoying the Portuguese Lifestyle

If it�s the beach you are after, the Algarve coast offers highly developed stretches of beach. The rest of the coast (with the exception of the area near Lisbon and Porto) remain relaxing, totally Portuguese and isolated. Great stretches of sand are there for the relaxing, especially along the northern Costa Verde. near Viano do Castelo. The beaches near southern Alentejo are the most remote and least populated.

Transports

Transportation and accommodation are excellent and very reasonable, perhaps the cheapest in Europe. The wine is excellent and don�t forget to try some vinho do Porto (port), Portugal�s most famous export. If you are interested click here.

Climate

Summer might be the most popular time to visit the town of Portugal, but for the traveler who can chart his or her own course, spring and autumn are the most delectable seasons.

Habitually there are only slight fluctuations in temperature between summer and winter; the overall mean ranges from 25�C in summer to about 14�C in winter. The rainy season begins in November and usually lasts through January.





28/05/2017

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Portugal – Lonely Planet #buy #airline #tickets

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Introducing Portugal

Medieval castles, cobblestone villages, captivating cities and golden beaches: the Portugal experience can be many things. History, great food and idyllic scenery are just the beginning…

Why I Love Portugal

By Regis St Louis, Writer

Portugal is full of surprises and I never tire of exploring this small but endlessly fascinating country. I’m enamoured by the scenery, the old-fashioned traditions of village life and Portugal’s outstanding, very affordable seafood. I love taking in the stunning views along the coast, going for mountain treks and bumping into shepherds in the Serra da Estrela, and wandering the pretty towns of the Minho .

Ghosts of the Past

Celts, Romans, Visigoths, Moors and Christians all left their mark on the Iberian nation. Here, you can gaze upon 20,000-year-old stone carvings in the Vila Nova de Foz Côa, watch the sunset over mysterious megaliths outside Évora or lose yourself in the elaborate corridors of Unesco World Heritage Sites in Tomar. Belém, Alcobaça or Batalha. You can pack an itinerary visiting palaces set above mist-covered woodlands, craggy clifftop castles and stunningly preserved medieval town centres.

Rhythms of Portugal

Festivals pack Portugal’s calendar. Drink, dance and feast your way through all-night revelries like Lisbon’s Festa de Santo António or Porto’s Festa de São João. There are kick-up-your-heels country fairs in the hinterlands, and rock- and world-music fests all along the coast. Any time of year is right to hear the mournful music of fado in the Alfama. join the dance party in Bairro Alto or hit the bars in Porto. Coimbra and Lagos.

Cinematic Scenery

Outside the cities, Portugal’s beauty unfolds in all its startling variety. You can go hiking amid the granite peaks of Parque Nacional da Peneda-Gerês or take in the pristine scenery and historic villages of the little-explored Beiras. Over 800km of coast offer more places to soak up the splendour. Gaze out over dramatic end-of-the-world cliffs, surf stellar breaks off dune-covered beaches or laze peacefully on sandy islands fronting calm blue seas. You’ll find dolphin-watching in the lush Sado Estuary, boating and kayaking along the meandering Rio Guadiana and memorable walks and bike rides all across the country.

The Portuguese Table

Freshly baked bread, olives, cheese, red wine or crisp vinho verde, chargrilled fish, cataplana (seafood stew), smoked meats – the Portuguese have perfected the art of cooking simple, delicious meals. Sitting down to table means experiencing the richness of Portugal’s bountiful coastline and fertile countryside. Of course, you don’t have to sit, you can take your piping-hot pastel de nata (custard tart) standing up at an 1837 patisserie in Belém, or wander through scenic vineyards sipping the velvety ports of the Douro valley. You can shop the produce-filled markets, or book a table in one of the country’s top dining rooms.





16/04/2017

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