Peru Travel Safety Recommendations #airfare #cheap

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Peru Travel Safety Recommendations

Peruvian flag (Photo: peru flag button image by Andrey Zyk from Fotolia.com )

Overview

Using common sense and seeking advice is key when it comes to travel safety. Uninformed travelers stand a much greater chance of ending up in a dangerous situation or losing their valuables. Tourists heading to Peru should know that while this South American country is a beautiful destination with lots to enjoy, it’s also a third-world country with a unique set of safety and security issues for travelers to be aware of.

Getting Around Town

The quickest way to get around cities and towns in Peru is by taxi. Most taxis are operated by individuals rather than reputable companies. While uncommon, you may be robbed by an unknown taxi driver and/or his accomplices if you take an unofficial cab ride. Avoid this risk by always taking officially licensed taxis recommended by hotel, airport or tourist office staff. You’ll encounter swarms of taxis waiting outside the main airport in the capital of Lima and near bus terminals around the country. Do not take these taxis. Instead, ask an employee with official identification to help you arrange a ride from a licensed operator you can trust. If you can’t avoid taking an unknown taxi, make a point of noting the registration number and concealing all valuables before you get in.

Long-Distance Bus Travel

Bus transportation is one of the primary methods of traveling between cities and towns in Peru. Avoid traveling at night, as many of the roads and highways in Peru are narrow and curvy which leads to a high rate of accidents. Hijacking is also more common at night along dark stretches of roads between towns. Schedule your trip so that you are traveling during daylight hours if possible. Try not to arrive in a new city or town at night, especially if you do not already have arrangements for a place to stay and direct transportation to the hotel. Keep valuables on your person at all times. Tuck backpack straps around your arms or feet, and check for your bags every time cargo is unloaded from the storage space below the bus. Things tend to go missing when you are careless or fail to pay close attention to your surroundings.

Money and Valuables

Never carry large sums of cash with you. Use a credit or debit card to withdraw the money you need at ATMs or banks. All cities and towns have ATMs and bank offices. Smaller villages and remote locations may not have these facilities, so plan in advance to take along the necessary currency. Make sure you have completely closed a transaction at an ATM after withdrawing money. Most ATMs are equipped with English on-screen prompts.

Keep your passport with you or leave it in a secure safe at your hotel. Print a copy of your passport to keep on your person at all times and another to store with your personal items in case the original passport is lost or stolen.

Avoid taking valuables with you when you travel. If you do take valuables, make an effort to be discreet. For instance, don’t talk loudly on your fancy cell phone or look at pictures on your digital camera while on a public bus or walking around town at night. Be aware of your surroundings when carrying a backpack or purse. Thieves sometimes snatch bags or cut holes in bags while the victim remains unaware. Staying alert is the easiest way to negate this threat.

Nightlife

Peruvian nightlife can be a blast but always put safety first. Never let a stranger buy you a drink. Purchase your own drinks and pay close attention to ensure no one slips anything into your glass. Tourists as well as locals have been drugged and robbed in Peru when accepting drinks from new acquaintances, so be careful.

Get back to your hotel or hostel safely. You should ask your hotel concierge for the number of an official taxi company that can be called to pick you up when you are ready to leave a disco or any other location around town. Travel in groups, and avoid drinking to the point of intoxication in order to keep your wits about you.





05/12/2017

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Costa Rica Travel Guide #costa #rica #itinerary, #costa #rica #tourist #information,


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Costa Rica Travel Guide

Why Go to Costa Rica

To many, Costa Rica’s charm lies in its lush rainforests, unspoiled beaches and abundance of wildlife. With breathtaking landscapes and a myriad of creatures from toucans to monkeys to jaguars it’s easy to see why. Where else can you hike active volcanoes, zip line through cloud-covered rainforests and surf warm turquoise waters within the span of just a few days? In this compact but diverse tropical paradise, exhilarating outdoor activities are abundant. Nature-seekers will roam thick jungles while beachgoers will sprawl across the powdery sands. It’s hard not to admire all the splendors this “Rich Coast” has to offer.

However, for others, this small Latin American country has a different appeal: it’s a relaxed way of life. Residents known as Ticos often recite the catchphrase “pura vida ” (or “pure life”). This guiding philosophy can be observed from Costa Rica’s central cosmopolitan capital of San Jos all the way to the sandy Atlantic and Pacific coasts. To truly immerse yourself in the good life, kick-back and admire the awe-inspiring scenery. Surround yourself with graceful butterflies at La Paz Waterfall Gardens. hike along the monumental Arenal Volcano. mingle with locals at Puerto Viejo de Talamanca. or simply sit in a hammock under a palm tree along the Nicoya Peninsula. We have a strong feeling you’ll discover the pure life, too.

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Rankings

The U.S. News World Report travel rankings are based on analysis of expert and user opinions. Read more about how we rank vacation destinations.

Costa Rica is ranked as:

Best of Costa Rica

Costa Rica

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Best Things to Do

Find out which sites and activities not to miss

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Best Hotels

What You Need to Know

  • Pack an umbrella Even if you’re planning to visit during Costa Rica’s dry season, don’t count on continuous sunshine. Showers can occur year-round.
  • Bring small bills The U.S. dollar (USD) is widely accepted in Costa Rica. It’s to your advantage to bring American money, particularly small bills for purchasing souvenirs and tipping.
  • Look out for “Golden Beans” Costa Rica has perfected a cup of java. Coffee enthusiasts can get their fix and learn about the planting and growing process at a variety of plantations across the country.

How to Save Money in Costa Rica

  • Don’t rent a car at the airport Most car rental companies at Costa Rica’s airports add a 12 percent charge to their rates. It’s best to reserve a car ahead of time from a company located in the heart of town rather than the airport.
  • For better rates, exchange at the airport The exchange rate is generally better in Costa Rica for American dollars (USD). While you’ll want to bring a few Costa Rican col ns (CRC) with you for small purchases upon arrival, exchange the bulk of your cash once you’re in the country.
  • Make sure the meter is running Taxi drivers have a reputation for charging extra by not switching the meter on. As soon as you step into a taxi, either check that the meter is running or negotiate a flat rate with the driver to avoid a scam.

Culture Customs

Costa Rican residents (los Costarricenses or “Ticos “) are known for their pleasant and easygoing nature. Always warm, welcoming and living life to the fullest, Ticos often greet each other with a hearty “Pura Vida! ” (meaning “pure life”). Don’t be alarmed by their benevolence and eagerness to please guests. To blend in, just reciprocate with kindness and embrace their positive philosophy.

The official language here is Spanish; however, you’ll find English-speakers in popular tourist areas. But using some key phrases, such as “por favor ” (“please”) and “gracias ” (“thank you”), is a polite gesture that goes a long way.

Dressing in casual clothing coincides with the laid-back Costa Rican lifestyle. You’ll want to pack loose fitting clothing and sturdy hiking shoes if you’re planning to explore the country’s rustic wildlife reserves, volcanoes and parks. You’ll also want to lather up with sunscreen and insect repellent, as mosquitoes and other critters swarm Costa Rica’s damp rainforests.

Coffee beans are commonly associated with the “Gold Coast.” You’re also likely to spot coffee plantations in the Central Plains; many travelers enjoy taking tours here. However, high-end coffee beans are hard to come by since they are commonly exported rather than sold locally.

Costa Rica’s official currency is the Costa Rica Col n (CRC). Since the CRC to U.S. dollar exchange rate fluctuates, be sure to check what the exchange rate is before you go. Major credit cards are accepted at most restaurants and shops.

As far as dining goes, travelers should note that restaurants add gratuity onto the bill. However, tipping extra is not uncommon; if the service is stellar, leave an additional tip. For tour guides and drivers, plan to dole out about $10 USD per day.

Costa Rica’s official religion is Catholicism. More than 90 percent of Costa Rica’s population identifies as Catholic; however, the Catholic Church’s presence is not readily visible to the unsuspecting traveler, except during patron saint celebrations when locals flock to the streets outside churches for dancing, music and scrumptious cuisine.

In Costa Rica, you’ll face few safety concerns. However, in congested San Jos . you’ll want to keep an eye on your belongings and your rental car. Pickpocketing and car theft are common in heavily trafficked tourist areas.

Getting Around Costa Rica

The best way to get around Costa Rica is by bus, which is reliable, navigable, inexpensive and frequently runs through San Jos . Driving on your own is not highly recommended as some roads are tricky (speckled with potholes and ambiguously marked intersections). A better alternative to renting your own set of wheels is hiring a car-and-driver service recommended from your hotel. so you can enjoy the country’s gorgeous scenery without having to tackle challenging roads with confusing signage. For a hassle-free means of getting to downtown San Jos from the Juan Santamar a International Airport (SJO), you’ll want to flag a taxi. If you’re planning to explore Guanacaste and the Nicoya Peninsula in the northwest part of Costa Rica, you can easily hail a taxi from the Daniel Oduber Quir s International Airport (LIR).

Check Flights to Costa Rica

Search for the best flight deals across Orbitz, Expedia, Kayak and more.

Entry Exit Requirements

U.S. citizens traveling to Costa Rica will need a passport that is valid for the length of their stay in Costa Rica. Many airlines also require travelers to have a round-trip ticket before boarding flights to Costa Rica to ward off fines imposed by Costa Rican Immigration. Travelers should expect to pay a $29 USD airport departure tax. Visitors can pay the fee upon arrival in Costa Rica or before departure at the Bancr dito counter in the airport. However, it is highly recommended to pay in advance as lines can get long at the airport. If you’re planning to stay longer than 90 days, you are required to apply for an extension to the Office of Temporary Permits. To learn more, visit the U.S. State Department website .

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01/10/2017

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Stock trade online #msft, #msft #analyst #estimates, #msft #earnings #estimates, #msft


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Microsoft Corp.

  • Jul. 21, 2017 at 6:09 a.m. ET
  • by Nigam Arora

Microsoft Corp. produced much better profit in its fiscal fourth quarter than expected, and shares rose to prices that would be records in late trading Thursday. The company reported net income of $6.5 billion, or 83 cents a share, on sales of $23.3 billion. After adjusting for Windows revenue deferrals and other effects, the company claimed earnings of 98 cents a share on sales of $24.7 billion. Analysts on average expected adjusted earnings of 71 cents a share on sales of $24.3 billion, according to FactSet. Microsoft shares hit an intraday record price of $74.30 and closed at an all-time high of $74.22 Thursday, then gained as much as 2% in immediate trading following the report s release.

  • Jul. 20, 2017 at 4:18 p.m. ET
  • by Jeremy C. Owens

Microsoft reports adjusted earnings of 98 cents a share on sales of $23.3 billion

Microsoft reports adjusted earnings of 98 cents a share on sales of $23.3 billion

  • Jul. 20, 2017 at 4:06 p.m. ET
  • by MarketWatch

U.S. stocks ended a quiet session with slight moves on Thursday, although the the Nasdaq extended its recent winning streak to close at a record. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 21 points, or 0.1%, to 21,619, with Home Depot among its biggest decliners. The stock lost 4.1%. The S P 500 ended essentially unchanged on the day, dropping less than 0.1% to end at 2,473.72. The benchmark index hit an intraday record in early trading. The Nasdaq Composite Index rose 5 points, or 0.1%, to 6,390 and ended higher for a tenth straight session, its longest such streak since February 2015. The index also closed at a record, having been supported by Microsoft Corp. which rose 0.5% ahead of its results.

  • Jul. 20, 2017 at 4:05 p.m. ET
  • by Ryan Vlastelica
  • Jul. 20, 2017 at 2:57 p.m. ET
  • by Jeremy C. Owens
  • Jul. 24, 2017 at 2:01 p.m. ET
  • on Seeking Alpha

Analysts are shrugging off worries over Applied Optoelectronics (AAOI) customer concentration amid a report that one of its primary customers, Amazon (AMZN), is testing new ways to order fiber-optic components for use in data center communications. [ibd-display-video id=2057696 width=50 float=left autostart=true]Needham Co. on Monday hiked its price target on Applied to 115 from 100, and shares in the company jumped nearly 7% to 96.35 in

  • Jul. 24, 2017 at 9:35 a.m. ET
  • on Investors Business Daily
  • Jul. 24, 2017 at 1:39 p.m. ET
  • on Motley Fool

Microsoft s Office 365 Is The New Windows

  • Jul. 24, 2017 at 1:19 p.m. ET
  • on Seeking Alpha

Alphabet Inc (GOOGL) Stock Is a No-Brainer, Buy Ahead of Earnings

  • Jul. 24, 2017 at 12:45 p.m. ET
  • on InvestorPlace.com

The Next Driver of Microsoft Corporation (MSFT) Stock: AI?

  • Jul. 24, 2017 at 12:52 p.m. ET
  • on InvestorPlace.com

Meag Munich Ergo Kapitalanlagegesellschaft Mbh Buys UnitedHealth Group Inc, Micron Technology Inc, Coca-Cola Co, Sells UBS Group AG, Cisco Systems Inc, International Business Machines Corp

  • Jul. 24, 2017 at 12:38 p.m. ET
  • on GuruFocus.com

Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (AMD) Is an Innovation Machine

  • Jul. 24, 2017 at 12:16 p.m. ET
  • on InvestorPlace.com

29/08/2017

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It support companies #xom, #xom #analyst #estimates, #xom #earnings #estimates, #xom


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Exxon Mobil Corp.

  • Jul. 21, 2017 at 4:56 a.m. ET
  • by Samuel Rubenfeld

Exxon Mobil was fined $2 million by the Treasury Department for violating Ukraine-related sanctions – when the company s CEO was Rex Tillerson, now the U.S. secretary of state. The Office of Foreign Assets Control said the presidents of its U.S. subsidaries signed legal contracts with Igor Sechin, the president of Rosneft. Exxon says the fine was fundamentally unfair and that it followed the clear guidance from the White House and Treasury Department because the activity related to Rosneft s business and not Sechin s personal business. (Updates to include Exxon s reaction.)

  • Jul. 20, 2017 at 10:56 a.m. ET
  • by Steve Goldstein

Exxon shares steady after Treasury fine, up 0.4% in early trade

Exxon shares steady after Treasury fine, up 0.4% in early trade

  • Jul. 20, 2017 at 10:25 a.m. ET
  • by Mark DeCambre
  • Jul. 12, 2017 at 4:28 p.m. ET
  • by Sara Sjolin

U.S. stocks opened higher on Wednesday, after Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen, in prepared congressional testimony, said interest rate increases would be gradual and that they wouldn t need to rise much further. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 82 points, or 0.4%, to 21,497. The S P 500 added 10 points to 2,436, a gain of 0.4%. The Nasdaq Composite Index rose 46 points to 6,240, a rise of 0.8%. Stocks have been supported by low rates over the past several years, and abrupt changes to that environment could lead to volatility in equities. Also boosting stocks was the energy sector, which gained alongside a 2% jump in the price of crude oil. Among the biggest gainers, Chesapeake Energy Corp. added 1.7% while Exxon Mobil Corp. was up 0.8%.

  • Jul. 12, 2017 at 9:31 a.m. ET
  • by Ryan Vlastelica

Exxon Mobil coverage resumed at sector perform, down from previous outperform at RBC Capital

Exxon Mobil coverage resumed at sector perform, down from previous outperform at RBC Capital

  • Jul. 6, 2017 at 7:20 a.m. ET
  • by Tomi Kilgore
  • Jul. 5, 2017 at 4:31 p.m. ET
  • by Sara Sjolin

U.S. stocks ended mostly higher Wednesday in post-holiday trade, powered by gains in technology, health-care and financial shares. Trading marked the first full session in July and follows holiday-shortened trade on Monday, with markets closed Tuesday in observance of Independence Day. The Dow Jones Industrial Average finished flat at 21,479, the S P 500 index climbed 0.2% to finish at 2,433. Meanwhile, the Nasdaq Composite Index. enjoyed the best performance among the benchmarks on the day, advancing 0.7% at 6,150, after closing in the red in the past three sessions. A popular tech-fund, the Technology Select Sector SPDR ETF. ended 0.9% higher. Bears have fretted that brisk gains in the tech sector have left it vulnerable to a selloff. Wednesday s moves follow a release of minutes at 2 p.m. Eastern from the Federal Reserve, which signaled the central bank s intention to start to shrink its $4.5 trillion balance sheet as early as September. Reducing its balance sheet, accumulated during the 2008- 09 financial crisis, can serve as an additional tightening as the Fed aims to normalize monetary policy. Meanwhile, U.S. crude-oil prices settled more than 4% lower, snapping an 8-session rally. Lower oil prices weighed on energy-related stocks, including Chevron Corp. and Exxon Mobil Corp. In corporate news, shares of Tesla Inc. tumbled into correction territory in the wake of downbeat deliveries data. Shares ended down 7.2%.

  • Jul. 5, 2017 at 4:07 p.m. ET
  • by Mark DeCambre
  • Jul. 4, 2017 at 5:02 p.m. ET
  • by Bradley Olson

A popular exchange-traded fund used to bet on the energy sector on Tuesday was looking at its worst daily decline in more than three months, according to FactSet data. The Energy Select Sector SPDR ETF was down 2.2% in recent trade, putting it on pace to log its steepest drop since March 8, when it plunged 2.6%. The slump in the energy-focused ETF was led by sharp drops in Transocean Ltd. Hess Corp. and Marathon Oil Corp. which were down at least 4%. All of the index s components were trading in the red, in early trade. The decline for the sector comes as crude-oil prices sink to a seven-month low and are flirting with a close in bear-market territory, defined as a fall of at least 20% from a recent peak. Crude s slump was putting pressure on the S P 500 index. with the energy sector the worst performer among the benchmark s 11 sectors, while the Dow Jones Industrial Average was lower, weighed by a 1.6% decline in shares of Chevron Corp. and a 1.3% fall in shares of Exxon Mobil Corp.

  • Jun. 20, 2017 at 10:41 a.m. ET
  • by Mark DeCambre
  • Jun. 18, 2017 at 5:25 p.m. ET
  • by Jeff Reeves

24/08/2017

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Jetsetter Moves Beyond Flash Sales: Recommendations Now A Third Of Its

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Jetsetter Moves Beyond Flash Sales: Recommendations Now A Third Of Its Business

Walmart Buys Facebook s Birthday And Holiday Reminder App Social Calendar

Jetsetter. the exclusive travel community for globetrotters, seems to be on a roll. In recent days, the company has announced a dozen some new corporate partners, a handful of new sale formats to entice customers, and new distribution partnerships with high-profile sites like Kayak. The Economist  and the vacation rental service HomeAway .

But while many think of Jetsetter as a flash sales for travel site, it’s been finding growth in other verticals: curated recommendations and personal service.

Launched back in September 2009, Jetsetter was the first flash sales site for travel, and has now outlasted much of its earlier competition. Unlike online travel bookings sites aimed at helping users find the cheapest flights and hotel rooms, Jetsetter’s angle is different. It targets not the everyday traveler, but the affluent one.

“Jetsetter customers tend to be six-figure incomes, college-educated professionals, and they tend to come from major urban markets – New York, San Francisco, L.A. Boston, Chicago,” explains Jetsetter CEO and founder Drew Patterson. “These are people for whom travel, and their experiences in travel, are an important part of their sense of self,” he says.

Targeting the elite customer has, so far, paid off. Jetsetter now has 2.2 million members, and has sold over half a million room nights worldwide. On the company’s website, members can take advantage of flash sales on travel, which offer savings of up to 50% off. The site runs anywhere from 20 to 40 of these sales per week. There’s also an online concierge service for bookings to help customers with travel planning.

The available inventory for travelers now includes over 650 hotels and resorts in Jetsetter 24/7, its full-price retail offering, which today accounts for over 30% of the company’s revenue. There are also nearly 300 homes in Jetsetter Homes, an increasingly popular vertical for the company, with 500 more in the process of being added.

“The non-hotel category of lodging has been exploding,” says Patterson, noting consumers’ interest in companies like Airbnb and Inspirato, for example. “Consumers are hungry for something other than hotels. It’s nice to have common space, a kitchen and living room versus bedroom,” he adds. But Patterson says that it’s still hard to book vacation homes online, not only because there aren’t many systems that support online booking, but also because of security issues.

“There are concerns and risks around financial settlement,” he says. “Typically you’re wiring funds with a homeowner, and you’ve never met this person before. You haven’t seen the product before. There’s a fair amount of risk and uncertainty involved in that.”

Jetsetter wants to step in to be the middleman for those transactions, taking on the financial risk, he says. They curate and vet the properties, even going onsite to visit them. That helps to establish trust with their users.

In addition to vacation rentals, Jetsetter’s personal travel planning offering executed 600 trips last year, despite having only launched in June. Today, there are approximately 400 trips in progress, which consumers booked thanks to the recommendations from Jetsetter’s network of over 200 correspondents – experienced travel experts and writers who visit the hotels and partners on Jetsetter’s behalf.

It’s this focus on curation, personalization and recommendation that’s proving to be a growing part of Jetsetter’s business. One third of the company’s revenue came from retail in January, as customers seem willing to pay full price when recommendations are involved.

Jetsetter is also going after customers through other verticals, specifically through new distribution partnerships like travel site Kayak.com  which will see all 650 Jetsetter hotels made available for bookings, as well as with the vacation rental website HomeAway. which is testing Jetsetter integration  with 150 homes. The company is also working with The Economist  on an exclusive 6-week campaign of flash sales curated for the outlet’s readers, which includes distribution through The Economist’s homepage, newsletters, social media and mobile.

New sales formats have been recently introduced to provide a variety of experiences for Jetsetter customers. One, the “Mystery Monday” model, will provide deeper discounts to customers willing to book before learning the hotel’s name. It’s not all that unlike the blind bookings Priceline offers, but the hotels selected are of high quality, like The Ritz-Carlton, the Four Seasons, and The Surrey, all of which made an appearance in January.

There are also two-to-three night getaways called Jetsetter Weekends, focused on a collection of inns and B B’s outside of Jetsetter’s top seven markets (N.Y. Boston, D.C. Miami, L.A. San Francisco, and Seattle). Meanwhile, new “Style Steals” offer discounted rooms at hip, boutique hotels. Jetsetter also says it occasionally runs sales for properties that prefer the voucher format like the Trump Hotel Collection, The Peninsula Hotels, Marquis Jets, and Groundlink, for example.

With all these sales formats combined, it seems that you can no longer call Jetsetter just a “flash sales site” for travel, even though it has an association with sister site Gilt Groupe. known for its flash sale properties.

“We obviously have a flash sale part of the business. That’s hugely important because that was our roots,” says Patterson. “But we also found that customers would write us early on and say, ‘I missed the sale. You emailed me something last week and it seemed great, but it’s not up there anymore. Just tell me what it was. It looked great and I want to go buy it.’”

“We said, Huh?’” he laughs. “But we had enough of these that it seemed like consumers really seemed to trust our judgment. That judgment is an important part of our business and our brand.”

And flash sales?

“Flash sales can inspire consumers and give them ideas for where they should go,” he says.





06/08/2017

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San Antonio Travel Guide #san #antonio #itinerary, #san #antonio #travel #guide,


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San Antonio Travel Guide

Why Go to San Antonio

Davy Crockett may have perished at the Alamo. but San Antonio clings to the Texan pride shown by the “King of the Wild Frontier” and his compatriots in 1836. This modern city’s history especially rears its noble head throughout downtown. In addition to the Alamo, you’ll find several other famous missions, all of which are now a part of the San Antonio Missions National Historic Park. And amongst the gleaming skyscrapers, the austere San Fernando Cathedral still stands as a testament to the city’s religious past. But, don’t be fooled: You don’t need a hankering for history to enjoy this city. With theme parks, top-notch museums, professional sports teams and the famous River Walk. you might have too much to do to “Remember the Alamo.”

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Rankings

The U.S. News World Report travel rankings are based on analysis of expert and user opinions. Read more about how we rank vacation destinations.

San Antonio is ranked as:

What You Need to Know

  • An educated city San Antonio boasts several institutions of higher education, including Trinity University, San Antonio College and UT-San Antonio, that surround the downtown area.
  • A true taste of Texas Fiesta San Antonio takes over the entire city for 10 days in April to honor Texan heroes of the past. Visit during the fiesta to get a dose of Texas pride.
  • Mexican influences Although Texas gained independence from Mexico long ago, Mexican influences abound. The current Mexican-American population is proud of its ancestry and you’ll find frequent displays of it in the form of parades, artwork and local cuisine.

How to Save Money in San Antonio

  • Be a weekend warrior An influx of business travelers cause hotel room rates to surge during the week. Stay on the weekend and you could save big.
  • Check the calendar Conventions lead to sold-out hotels across town. These travelers have probably booked their accommodations months before San Antonio popped into your head as a viable vacation spot. Check the city’s tourism bureau website and try to avoid convention-heavy weeks and weekends.
  • Eat around the corner Restaurants around the River Walk and other touristy areas will have higher prices than those only a few blocks away.

Culture Customs

San Antonio is a mix of the old and the new: the Alamo stands strong among contemporary skyscrapers and the banks of the San Antonio River are populated with the River Walk ‘s burgeoning businesses and restaurants. San Antonio residents are proud of their history, with many shops selling memorabilia engraved with the words “Remember the Alamo.”

But this city isn’t just about the Wild West anymore. San Antonio has been heavily influenced by Mexican culture. Travel experts recommend stopping by Market Square (or El Mercado ) to find a variety of tasty Mexican foods, homemade goods and south of the border crafts. Mexican art is displayed everywhere you turn and Spanish widely spoken. For a more festive taste of Tex-Mex culture, head to the Mexican Rodeo or plan your trip during Fiesta in April.

What to Eat

San Antonio dining primarily revolves around two types of food: Tex-Mex and meat. Those craving spicy enchiladas or cheesy chimichangas from below the border are encouraged to dine in Southtown or South Side. Recent visitors highly recommend Rosario’s. which receives top marks for its prompt service and delectable plates like ceviche and chicken flautas.

However, the large influx of business and recreational travelers has boosted the diversity of cuisine. Downtown restaurants cater to carnivores, offering local favorites like prime rib and chicken-fried steak, and feature some of the more upscale eateries like Bliss and Bohanan’s. When you make your way to the River Walk. consider calling the restaurant you select ahead for a reservation since this area is quite popular. Some visitor favorites along the river include Texas bistro Budro’s for its steaks and cenar for its contemporary Mexican cuisine.

Safety

Compared to other U.S. cities of similar size, San Antonio is a safe place to visit. You may see more guns than you’re used to, but gun violence does not generally affect tourists. Visitors should still use common sense. Stick to well-lit areas after dark and keep a close eye on your valuables.

Those who are not used to the Texas heat should take precautions against heat stroke and dehydration, especially during the summer months. Heat stroke and dehydration symptoms commonly include headaches, nausea, dizziness and fatigue. Drink plenty of water, apply sunscreen on a regular basis and if you are participating in more strenuous activities, such as hiking or biking, make sure to rest periodically.

Residents of Texas Hill Country often share the land with numerous creepy-crawlies, including scorpions, rattlesnakes and water moccasins. While you most likely won’t come face to face with these creatures within the city itself, those exploring the countryside surrounding San Antonio may encounter these critters or insects. Keep an eye out when walking around to avoid confrontation. If you’re bitten or stung, seek medical attention immediately.

Neighborhoods


03/08/2017

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Jetsetter Moves Beyond Flash Sales: Recommendations Now A Third Of Its

#jetsetter travel
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Jetsetter Moves Beyond Flash Sales: Recommendations Now A Third Of Its Business

Walmart Buys Facebook s Birthday And Holiday Reminder App Social Calendar

Jetsetter. the exclusive travel community for globetrotters, seems to be on a roll. In recent days, the company has announced a dozen some new corporate partners, a handful of new sale formats to entice customers, and new distribution partnerships with high-profile sites like Kayak. The Economist  and the vacation rental service HomeAway .

But while many think of Jetsetter as a flash sales for travel site, it’s been finding growth in other verticals: curated recommendations and personal service.

Launched back in September 2009, Jetsetter was the first flash sales site for travel, and has now outlasted much of its earlier competition. Unlike online travel bookings sites aimed at helping users find the cheapest flights and hotel rooms, Jetsetter’s angle is different. It targets not the everyday traveler, but the affluent one.

“Jetsetter customers tend to be six-figure incomes, college-educated professionals, and they tend to come from major urban markets – New York, San Francisco, L.A. Boston, Chicago,” explains Jetsetter CEO and founder Drew Patterson. “These are people for whom travel, and their experiences in travel, are an important part of their sense of self,” he says.

Targeting the elite customer has, so far, paid off. Jetsetter now has 2.2 million members, and has sold over half a million room nights worldwide. On the company’s website, members can take advantage of flash sales on travel, which offer savings of up to 50% off. The site runs anywhere from 20 to 40 of these sales per week. There’s also an online concierge service for bookings to help customers with travel planning.

The available inventory for travelers now includes over 650 hotels and resorts in Jetsetter 24/7, its full-price retail offering, which today accounts for over 30% of the company’s revenue. There are also nearly 300 homes in Jetsetter Homes, an increasingly popular vertical for the company, with 500 more in the process of being added.

“The non-hotel category of lodging has been exploding,” says Patterson, noting consumers’ interest in companies like Airbnb and Inspirato, for example. “Consumers are hungry for something other than hotels. It’s nice to have common space, a kitchen and living room versus bedroom,” he adds. But Patterson says that it’s still hard to book vacation homes online, not only because there aren’t many systems that support online booking, but also because of security issues.

“There are concerns and risks around financial settlement,” he says. “Typically you’re wiring funds with a homeowner, and you’ve never met this person before. You haven’t seen the product before. There’s a fair amount of risk and uncertainty involved in that.”

Jetsetter wants to step in to be the middleman for those transactions, taking on the financial risk, he says. They curate and vet the properties, even going onsite to visit them. That helps to establish trust with their users.

In addition to vacation rentals, Jetsetter’s personal travel planning offering executed 600 trips last year, despite having only launched in June. Today, there are approximately 400 trips in progress, which consumers booked thanks to the recommendations from Jetsetter’s network of over 200 correspondents – experienced travel experts and writers who visit the hotels and partners on Jetsetter’s behalf.

It’s this focus on curation, personalization and recommendation that’s proving to be a growing part of Jetsetter’s business. One third of the company’s revenue came from retail in January, as customers seem willing to pay full price when recommendations are involved.

Jetsetter is also going after customers through other verticals, specifically through new distribution partnerships like travel site Kayak.com  which will see all 650 Jetsetter hotels made available for bookings, as well as with the vacation rental website HomeAway. which is testing Jetsetter integration  with 150 homes. The company is also working with The Economist  on an exclusive 6-week campaign of flash sales curated for the outlet’s readers, which includes distribution through The Economist’s homepage, newsletters, social media and mobile.

New sales formats have been recently introduced to provide a variety of experiences for Jetsetter customers. One, the “Mystery Monday” model, will provide deeper discounts to customers willing to book before learning the hotel’s name. It’s not all that unlike the blind bookings Priceline offers, but the hotels selected are of high quality, like The Ritz-Carlton, the Four Seasons, and The Surrey, all of which made an appearance in January.

There are also two-to-three night getaways called Jetsetter Weekends, focused on a collection of inns and B B’s outside of Jetsetter’s top seven markets (N.Y. Boston, D.C. Miami, L.A. San Francisco, and Seattle). Meanwhile, new “Style Steals” offer discounted rooms at hip, boutique hotels. Jetsetter also says it occasionally runs sales for properties that prefer the voucher format like the Trump Hotel Collection, The Peninsula Hotels, Marquis Jets, and Groundlink, for example.

With all these sales formats combined, it seems that you can no longer call Jetsetter just a “flash sales site” for travel, even though it has an association with sister site Gilt Groupe. known for its flash sale properties.

“We obviously have a flash sale part of the business. That’s hugely important because that was our roots,” says Patterson. “But we also found that customers would write us early on and say, ‘I missed the sale. You emailed me something last week and it seemed great, but it’s not up there anymore. Just tell me what it was. It looked great and I want to go buy it.’”

“We said, Huh?’” he laughs. “But we had enough of these that it seemed like consumers really seemed to trust our judgment. That judgment is an important part of our business and our brand.”

And flash sales?

“Flash sales can inspire consumers and give them ideas for where they should go,” he says.





17/06/2017

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Peru Travel Safety Recommendations #travel #magazine

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Peru Travel Safety Recommendations

Peruvian flag (Photo: peru flag button image by Andrey Zyk from Fotolia.com )

Overview

Using common sense and seeking advice is key when it comes to travel safety. Uninformed travelers stand a much greater chance of ending up in a dangerous situation or losing their valuables. Tourists heading to Peru should know that while this South American country is a beautiful destination with lots to enjoy, it’s also a third-world country with a unique set of safety and security issues for travelers to be aware of.

Getting Around Town

The quickest way to get around cities and towns in Peru is by taxi. Most taxis are operated by individuals rather than reputable companies. While uncommon, you may be robbed by an unknown taxi driver and/or his accomplices if you take an unofficial cab ride. Avoid this risk by always taking officially licensed taxis recommended by hotel, airport or tourist office staff. You’ll encounter swarms of taxis waiting outside the main airport in the capital of Lima and near bus terminals around the country. Do not take these taxis. Instead, ask an employee with official identification to help you arrange a ride from a licensed operator you can trust. If you can’t avoid taking an unknown taxi, make a point of noting the registration number and concealing all valuables before you get in.

Long-Distance Bus Travel

Bus transportation is one of the primary methods of traveling between cities and towns in Peru. Avoid traveling at night, as many of the roads and highways in Peru are narrow and curvy which leads to a high rate of accidents. Hijacking is also more common at night along dark stretches of roads between towns. Schedule your trip so that you are traveling during daylight hours if possible. Try not to arrive in a new city or town at night, especially if you do not already have arrangements for a place to stay and direct transportation to the hotel. Keep valuables on your person at all times. Tuck backpack straps around your arms or feet, and check for your bags every time cargo is unloaded from the storage space below the bus. Things tend to go missing when you are careless or fail to pay close attention to your surroundings.

Money and Valuables

Never carry large sums of cash with you. Use a credit or debit card to withdraw the money you need at ATMs or banks. All cities and towns have ATMs and bank offices. Smaller villages and remote locations may not have these facilities, so plan in advance to take along the necessary currency. Make sure you have completely closed a transaction at an ATM after withdrawing money. Most ATMs are equipped with English on-screen prompts.

Keep your passport with you or leave it in a secure safe at your hotel. Print a copy of your passport to keep on your person at all times and another to store with your personal items in case the original passport is lost or stolen.

Avoid taking valuables with you when you travel. If you do take valuables, make an effort to be discreet. For instance, don’t talk loudly on your fancy cell phone or look at pictures on your digital camera while on a public bus or walking around town at night. Be aware of your surroundings when carrying a backpack or purse. Thieves sometimes snatch bags or cut holes in bags while the victim remains unaware. Staying alert is the easiest way to negate this threat.

Nightlife

Peruvian nightlife can be a blast but always put safety first. Never let a stranger buy you a drink. Purchase your own drinks and pay close attention to ensure no one slips anything into your glass. Tourists as well as locals have been drugged and robbed in Peru when accepting drinks from new acquaintances, so be careful.

Get back to your hotel or hostel safely. You should ask your hotel concierge for the number of an official taxi company that can be called to pick you up when you are ready to leave a disco or any other location around town. Travel in groups, and avoid drinking to the point of intoxication in order to keep your wits about you.





16/04/2017

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