Best cars for teen drivers #teen #drivers, #best #cars #for #teens,

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The best cars for teen drivers

*Fewer visits is better.

Choosing the right car for teens: Safety first, then price

What your teen is looking for in a car and what you want them driving are often two different things.

Boring is the way to go, according to Penny Gusner, consumer analyst with Insure.com. “Parents need to look for a boring, used car with lots of safety features. You want a car that the teen isn’t going to drive beyond their skills. Sedans are popular choices for novice drivers.”

After safety, most parents are looking for affordability. Our list includes a wide variety of price points, ranging from $9,600 up to the full $15,000 limit. The recommended vehicles range from a smaller car, like the Honda Civic, all the way up to the Hyundai Tuscan SUV.

McCartt likes the bigger cars for teen drivers. “When thinking about safety, parents may focus on features like the number of airbags, but a key part of crash protection is a vehicle’s size and weight. Bigger, heavier vehicles are more protective in crashes than smaller, lighter ones,” explains McCartt.

Sports cars are an obvious no-no. Teen drivers don’t need the horsepower. “When buying a used vehicle for a teen, there are a few things you shouldn’t compromise on,” says McCartt. “Avoid high-horsepower vehicles that can encourage risky driving.”

Now it’s time to look at one of the biggest cost factors, insuring your teen.

Teen drivers: Car insurance rates for four scenarios

While you certainly love your teen, there is a good chance your insurer will not. Car insurance for young drivers, whether you add them to your policy or they get their own, is always expensive. Teens bring stacks of risk to the table and insurance companies will charge you for that risk.

See our guides to average rates by state for every age:

According to the IIHS, a total of 2,823 teens died in car crashes in 2012. While this is a 68 percent drop from 1975 (thank airbags, ESC, and other safety features) it is still too many fatal accidents. Males are especially dangerous, accounting for two out of every three teen drivers killed.

These depressing stats are a major reason for your impending premium increase. “Parents will normally see their car insurance bill double when adding a teen,” says Gusner. “A premium increase of anywhere from 100 to 200 percent is common.”

Let’s look at the numbers and see just what a teen will do to your rates.

Meet the Smith family. Abby (the mom) is 40, has a spotless driving record and is the primary driver of a 2015 Toyota RAV 4 LE. Jack (the Dad) is a bit older at 45, also has a spotless driving record and cruises around town in a 2010 Honda Accord LX.

The best full coverage quote we could find for Jack and Abby was $1,788 a year, while the most expensive premium clocked in at $3,216. The difference is a whopping $1,428, which clearly illustrates the fact that insurers rate risk differently, and shopping your coverage on a regular basis is extremely important.

Keep in mind that while this list highlights the rate differences between cars, it does not necessarily reflect what your household will pay for car insurance. Your rates could be lower or higher. The biggest factors that affect your premium are your ZIP code and your teen’s driving record.

Watch what happens when we add Abby and Jack’s 18-year old son Steve to the policy.

Assign the teen to your policy: The best rate we could find was $3,756, more than double their previous rate. The worst rate we came across was a budget-busting $6,444, a shocking 350 percent increase from the lowest quote without Steve.

Buy the teen a late-model used car: If Jack and Abby feel that Steve needs his own car and put him in a late model-vehicle, such as a financed 2012 Toyota Corolla, the lowest yearly premium jumps to $4,800, while the highest rate was almost $8,000 a year.

Buy the teen a beater car: Now let s stick Steve in a beater. Adding a 2008 Ford Taurus (liability coverage only) to the family policy drops the rate a bit, but not as much as you would hope. The cheapest quote was $4,400.

Giving the teen his own beater car and policy: Kicking Steve off the family policy, keeping him in that 2008 Ford Taurus with only liability insurance drops his premium to $2,544. But when the original $1,788 (Jack and Abby’s insurance) is added in, the annual cost to insure the family is back up to $4,332, so not a big money saver.

All of these numbers make one thing very clear, teens are expensive to insure, and frequently shopping your coverage can save you a ton of money.

Safety and car insurance tips for teen drivers

You can’t escape the price hike that adding a teen to your policy brings, but it is possible to minimize the damage. Here are a few tips from industry experts:

Be a role model. “A well-trained driver is the most important safety feature in any car,” says Doug Herbert, founder of Put On The B.R.A.K.E.S. “Practice frequently with your teen driver and be a good role model behind the wheel.”

Teen-driver course discounts. “Ask your insurer if there are discounts for a driver’s education course or if they have a teen program,” says Gusner. “Farmers’ program is called YES and State Farm has Steer Clear,” continues Gusner.

Buy umbrella coverage. “Consider an umbrella liability policy,” says Loretta Worters, with the Insurance Information Institute (III). “In our litigious society, you may want to have an extra layer of liability protection. For about $150 to $300 per year, you can buy a $1 million personal umbrella liability policy,” explains Worters.

Good student discount . Tell Junior to keep his grades up. “Your child can garner a discount if they maintain at least a B average. The discount usually runs from 5 to 15 percent,” says Gusner.

Raise deductibles . Jacking up your deductible can also be a money saver. “Going from a $250 to $500 or $1,000 deductible can shave 10 to 20 percent off of your premium,” says Worters.

Policy adjustments for college. Finally, when your teen goes to college, your rates may finally start dropping. “When your teen heads off to college, you may be eligible for lower premiums, provided the car stays behind. Many insurers will reduce rates for students attending a school at least 100 miles away from home who do not have a car on campus,” says Worters.

Insurance rates are for an 18-year-old male in ZIP code 80104 (Castle Rock, Colorado) commuting 20 miles each way to school, with no accidents or violations. Coverage includes $100,000 bodily injury liability (up to $300,000 per accident) and $50,000 in property damage liability, $10,000 in personal injury protection and comprehensive and collision coverage with $500 deductibles.





23/09/2017

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Ethical Dilemmas – Moral Dilemmas – Classroom Discussion #ethical, #moral, #dilemma,

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This is #17 of an ongoing series of discussion starters from the case files of Charis Denison. The situations presented are very real and are changed monthly. Please try them out with your students and share your results with us. You can find the complete archive of dilemmas here.

THE SITUATION
(present this to your students)


Kevin is a talented basketball player whose high school team made it into the playoffs and all the way to the city championship game. As a result, Kevin had to miss his school s baseball tryouts and a couple of weeks of practice. So, he was grateful when the coach gave him an opportunity to come out for the team anyway. Kevin s older brother had been on the varsity team for four years, so the coach knew the family and assumed Kevin would follow in his brother s footsteps. But Kevin had never played league baseball before and had no expectation of getting a lot of playing time. Besides, the team already had a solid lineup of experienced players; he would just have to be patient and earn his position through hard work.

Which is why Kevin was shocked when the coach announced the starting lineup for the first game: Kevin was picked to start at third base.

Kevin immediately felt confused, then embarrassed, then guilty. He was confused because the coach had never seen him play. He felt embarrassed and guilty because everyone knew that the coach must have made this decision based on Kevin s athletic reputation and the coach s relationship with Kevin s older brother. Kevin considered himself a team player. He also knew the other third baseman a strong player who never missed a practice. Surely the other guy deserved to be the starter. He looked around at his teammates and saw himself through their eyes. He felt bad. He walked to his position without making eye contact with the coach or the players.

After the game, Kevin called his brother and said he was thinking about asking the coach to let him step down until he had earned the position in a way that was fair to the rest of the team. His brother said no way. Life is about seizing opportunity. That s how you achieve your dreams. Why give up your big chance? Besides, he said, I put in a good word for you, so don t blow it.

Kevin felt like he was stuck. If he kept silent, he risked the respect of his team; if he came forward, he risked the athletic opportunity and his relationship with his coach. He needed to make a decision before the next game.

haris (KAIR-iss) Denison, founder of Prajna Consulting, is an expert in Community Involvement, Human Development, and Ethics. She has built her experience primarily by working with schools and non-profits for the past 15 years.

After initially teaching middle and high school English and Creative Writing, Charis began to develop curricula and publish articles related to social justice, ethics, human development, community involvement, and experiential education. She has received national recognition for her work in those fields, as well as for her community-based work with American teens and Tibetan refugees in Central Asia.

Charis co-wrote Tolerance for Others. a middle school human development text, with Leni Wildflower. She currently works as the national Service-Learning consultant for the Durango Institute for Co-Curricular Education.

Charis also teaches at Marin Academy in San Rafael, California, and runs Prajna Consulting. Through Prajna she consults with schools, parents, students, and businesses both organizationally and individually. Charis also facilitates workshops and speaks on a wide variety of topics.

NOTES FOR THE FACILITATOR
(this is for you)

This case is a great one for introducing students to the idea that taking no action is taking action. In other words, when my students are discussing scenarios like this and come back with the infamous, just take what happened and don t do anything; it s not your responsibility, I reply, not making a choice is a choice.

Students love to talk about times when they have been the victims of an unfair situation. It s a lot of fun to turn the tables on them and have them talk about when they have benefited from an unfair situation. Do they bear some responsibility to restore justice? I find it effective to get students to articulate what each of three parties would consider fair in the scenario (the coach, Kevin, the team).

If you have covered any of the more formal ethical principles, this case works very well when you assign one of the three principles to each group and have them apply it to their decision (ends-based, rule-based, care-based).

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
(also, debate topics, writing assignments, etc.

  • What do you think Kevin should do? What do you think you would do?
  • How do you think the team might feel about the coach letting Kevin start without having seen him play or participate in the first two weeks of practice?
  • What do you think is the coach s reason for making Kevin a starting player? Do you agree with it?
  • How do you feel about the role Kevin s brother is playing in all this?
  • How might Kevin feel if he doesn t talk to the coach?
  • How much influence do you think Kevin s brother has on Kevin s choice?
  • If you were faced with an ethical dilemma, how important would your sibling s opinion be?
  • Have you ever seen someone you know benefit from an unfair situation? What happened? What did it feel like? How did the person benefiting respond? If you didn t agree with that response, how do you wish he/she would have responded?
  • Have you ever benefited from an unfair situation? What happened and how did you respond? Would you respond in the same way again?

SHARE YOUR RESULTS WITH US. How did your students resolve this dilemma? Did anything surprising happen? Tell us about your discussion and we may publish your comments. Click here to send us an email.

For some very helpful articles about conducting productive, lively, meaningful classroom discussions (including Socratic method), click here.





13/09/2017

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College Visits and Tours for Families #planning #college #visits, #personal #assistant,

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The professionals at Custom College Visits have the in-depth knowledge and experience to create amazing college road trip experiences for your family.

Each custom designed itinerary includes all on-campus meetings and activities, as well as coordination of travel and hotel logistics.

Itineraries are designed based on colleges that interest your teen and each trip is scheduled according to your preferred travel dates.

Not sure what type of college will be the best fit for your teen?

We will plan a multi-campus itinerary that will let you and your teen explore different types of colleges and universities all based on your teen’s specific educational interests and lifestyle preferences.

Since 2009, Custom College Visits has been privileged to assist teens and families from around the world with their college tours.

Summer college tours can be particularly challenging for parents or teens to organize.

Call us +1 (650) 931-4515 or (800) 930-1701 for a free consultation.

Please scroll down to read what parents say about our college road trip itineraries.

“A friend who is a maven in finding outstanding resources, recommended Janice and Custom College Visits as we began the daunting college selection process. We worked with Janice on two fronts; to help create a list of colleges and to set-up meaningful colleges visits. The college visits were also a lot of fun for us as a family and very informative on so many levels. More importantly Janice helped make the college selection process manageable, not so daunting after all, and we felt no stone was left unturned in this important decision.

Tracy P. Parent of a New York City high school Senior

Thank you so much for planning such a wondrous experience for our son. The careful attention to detail was evident at every turn. Custom College Visits planning effort provided an appropriate path of discovery for our son and for us.

Michael C. New Jersey parent of a high school Junior

Hi Janice, Our trip was a thoroughly enjoyable family adventure! Thank you so much for the unique opportunities that you created for our daughter at each college. Meeting with a student at Harvard, was probably the most informative way to start the entire trip. She devoted a lot of time (in the rain) providing real college life details. She swiped us into dining halls, dorms & buildings that we might not have seen otherwise. The sophomore session at Princeton was wonderful! Thank you so much for everything that you did! We really were able to get the most out of each campus visit! Best, Julie

Julie, Parent of a high school Junior in Southern California

I found working with Custom College Visits a very positive experience. They were able to pinpoint colleges that were best suited for my daughter and the travel plans were well organized. In addition, they were able to set up an interview with a member of a college color guard, as my daughter had expressed interest in going to a school that had a color guard. I am very pleased with my experience with Custom College Visits, and would recommend them highly.

Mark L. Parent of high school junior in Northern California

Lili got accepted into her first choice school today (early decision): Boston University! She is thrilled beyond belief and relieved as well. We could not have done it without your help, it was invaluable. I think the High School Honors program she did there was probably very helpful and we would not have know about it without your forwarding the information to us. You rock! So, I am tipping my hat today to both you and Lili!

Kim T. Parent of high school senior in Kansas

I am happy to tell you that Nivi has been accepted early decision to Brown University. She is the first ivy leaguer in our family and we couldn’t be more proud! Her decision to apply was made easier because of the excellent experience she had during her customized tour via your company so thank you so much! We will be sure to recommend you to our friends here..

Gayathri S. Parent of high school senior Chennai, India

Thank you again for being so good at what you do. Our trip to the US was a huge success. I was on the verge of cancelling the trip but knew I couldn’t let my son down. That I even found you on the internet was a direct answer to my prayer for a miracle. The itinerary worked very well. I knew I was in good hands even before I boarded the plane to the U.S. and your attention to detail far exceeded my expectation.

Egbe O. Parent of international high school student

We had a wonderful trip to Philadelphia and Boston thanks to Janice Caine of Custom College Visits. She worked out an itinerary from start to finish. We visited 9 schools and it was as smooth as possible. Janice worked out tours and information sessions as well as meetings with tennis coaches.We have boy/girl twins and both were happy which is not an easy achievement. Not only did Janice work out the schedule but she recommended great schools in both towns. We would highly recommend her.

Phil S. Parent of high school students SF Bay Area

“Thank you SO MUCH for your involvement in the Splash Parents’ Program this weekend! I am just reviewing the feedback forms, and your presentation received rave reviews across the board; many parents cited it as the highlight of the program for them! Some verbatim quotes include: ‘The Planning and Preparing for College Visits was a great eye opener;’ Thank you for all the effort, energy, and enthusiasm you put into making the event such a success.”

Marisa M. Coordinator, Splash Parents’ Program Stanford University

Our college process was two-fold. It began with getting a jump start on the standardized testing, and not waiting until spring of junior year to focus. I believe our outcome was successful because we had a well-managed plan helped along by an expert, Janice Caine, of Custom College Visits.

Lisa L. Parent of high school students SF Bay Area

Happy New Year! Wanted to let you know that Charlie was accepted to Johns Hopkins Early Decision! Great news and very exciting all around. Thank you for all your help.

Beth A. Parent of a high school senior. Massachusetts





09/09/2017

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Travel For Teens #cheap #travel

#travel contests
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I Travel For 2015 Contest Rules

Deadlines

Instagram Contest

  • 1 photo can be entered every week between February 1st through March 15th, 2015
  • Voting will occur March 15th, through April 1st, 2015, 11:59pm EST
  • Winner will be announced April 15th, 2015
  • Instagram Contest prize winner will receive a full tuition scholarship, exclusive of any airfare costs.

Essay Contest

  • Submissions are being accepted now through April 1st, 2015 at 11:59pm, EST
  • Winner will be announced April 15th, 2015

Video Contest

  • Submissions are being accepted now through April 1st, 2015 at 11:59pm, EST
  • Winner will be announced April 15th, 2015

Rules!

Contestants are welcome to enter all three contests if they wish.  One essay, and one video may be entered per contestant, in a given contest year and an separate entry form must be completed for each submission.  If contestant is participating in our Instagram contest, they may submit one entry a week, through March 15th, 2015. Only Instagrams, essays and videos pertaining to the themes described on the Contest Info website will be considered. Essays and videos must be in English. Videos may not exceed 2 minutes, and essays must be NO more than 300 words to be considered. Every word of the essay is counted. This does not include the title, bibliography or footnotes. Any quotations or copyrighted material used in the essay, video or Instagram submission must be identified properly. Failure to identify non-original material will result in disqualification. Instagram Contest finalists and Video Contest finalists will be disqualified if suspected of voter fraud or if entrant engages in any harassment towards other finalists, at the sole discretion of Travel For Teens.

Copyrighted Music in Your Videos

Please do NOT include copyrighted music in your video it will be automatically disqualified because it would be illegal for us to publish it on our website. All contest submissions must be the original work of the entrant, and any copyrighted material must be properly documented. If you want to set your video to music, please use non-copyrighted music, available for free from a variety of websites, including Free Music Archive  and Incompetech .

Eligibility

Contest is open to all students who are in grades 7–12 and between the ages of 13–18 years old, from around the world. Certain restrictions may apply, contest is not valid where not legal.  Travel For Teens requires a teacher, counselor or an advisor on every essay and video entry.  The faculty advisor must be able to speak on behalf of the entrant and will be contacted in the event of the entrant winning.  By submitting an entry, you are agreeing to Travel For Teens, terms and rules of the above mentioned contests.

Prizes

The winner will receive one all-inclusive Travel For Teens trip and will be offered the choice of the following trips: Costa Rica Surf and Service, Costa Rica Adventure and Service, Barcelona and Paris, or Sicily Community Service. All prizes and trips are subject to availability. The winner will be determined by a panel of experts including teachers and Travel For Teens employees. Their decision is final. Judging will be based on Persuasiveness and Originality.  The Instagram Contest and Video Contest winner will receive one trip each, exclusive of any airfare costs.

Travel For Teens reserves the right to publish or otherwise duplicate any essay or video entered into the contest. The grand prize trips are non-transferable and have no cash value.

18/08/2017

Posted In: NEWS

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Travel For Teens #travel #to #israel

#travel contests
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I Travel For 2015 Contest Rules

Deadlines

Instagram Contest

  • 1 photo can be entered every week between February 1st through March 15th, 2015
  • Voting will occur March 15th, through April 1st, 2015, 11:59pm EST
  • Winner will be announced April 15th, 2015
  • Instagram Contest prize winner will receive a full tuition scholarship, exclusive of any airfare costs.

Essay Contest

  • Submissions are being accepted now through April 1st, 2015 at 11:59pm, EST
  • Winner will be announced April 15th, 2015

Video Contest

  • Submissions are being accepted now through April 1st, 2015 at 11:59pm, EST
  • Winner will be announced April 15th, 2015

Rules!

Contestants are welcome to enter all three contests if they wish.  One essay, and one video may be entered per contestant, in a given contest year and an separate entry form must be completed for each submission.  If contestant is participating in our Instagram contest, they may submit one entry a week, through March 15th, 2015. Only Instagrams, essays and videos pertaining to the themes described on the Contest Info website will be considered. Essays and videos must be in English. Videos may not exceed 2 minutes, and essays must be NO more than 300 words to be considered. Every word of the essay is counted. This does not include the title, bibliography or footnotes. Any quotations or copyrighted material used in the essay, video or Instagram submission must be identified properly. Failure to identify non-original material will result in disqualification. Instagram Contest finalists and Video Contest finalists will be disqualified if suspected of voter fraud or if entrant engages in any harassment towards other finalists, at the sole discretion of Travel For Teens.

Copyrighted Music in Your Videos

Please do NOT include copyrighted music in your video it will be automatically disqualified because it would be illegal for us to publish it on our website. All contest submissions must be the original work of the entrant, and any copyrighted material must be properly documented. If you want to set your video to music, please use non-copyrighted music, available for free from a variety of websites, including Free Music Archive  and Incompetech .

Eligibility

Contest is open to all students who are in grades 7–12 and between the ages of 13–18 years old, from around the world. Certain restrictions may apply, contest is not valid where not legal.  Travel For Teens requires a teacher, counselor or an advisor on every essay and video entry.  The faculty advisor must be able to speak on behalf of the entrant and will be contacted in the event of the entrant winning.  By submitting an entry, you are agreeing to Travel For Teens, terms and rules of the above mentioned contests.

Prizes

The winner will receive one all-inclusive Travel For Teens trip and will be offered the choice of the following trips: Costa Rica Surf and Service, Costa Rica Adventure and Service, Barcelona and Paris, or Sicily Community Service. All prizes and trips are subject to availability. The winner will be determined by a panel of experts including teachers and Travel For Teens employees. Their decision is final. Judging will be based on Persuasiveness and Originality.  The Instagram Contest and Video Contest winner will receive one trip each, exclusive of any airfare costs.

Travel For Teens reserves the right to publish or otherwise duplicate any essay or video entered into the contest. The grand prize trips are non-transferable and have no cash value.

12/07/2017

Posted In: NEWS

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Travel For Teens #travel #to #italy

#travel contests
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I Travel For 2015 Contest Rules

Deadlines

Instagram Contest

  • 1 photo can be entered every week between February 1st through March 15th, 2015
  • Voting will occur March 15th, through April 1st, 2015, 11:59pm EST
  • Winner will be announced April 15th, 2015
  • Instagram Contest prize winner will receive a full tuition scholarship, exclusive of any airfare costs.

Essay Contest

  • Submissions are being accepted now through April 1st, 2015 at 11:59pm, EST
  • Winner will be announced April 15th, 2015

Video Contest

  • Submissions are being accepted now through April 1st, 2015 at 11:59pm, EST
  • Winner will be announced April 15th, 2015

Rules!

Contestants are welcome to enter all three contests if they wish.  One essay, and one video may be entered per contestant, in a given contest year and an separate entry form must be completed for each submission.  If contestant is participating in our Instagram contest, they may submit one entry a week, through March 15th, 2015. Only Instagrams, essays and videos pertaining to the themes described on the Contest Info website will be considered. Essays and videos must be in English. Videos may not exceed 2 minutes, and essays must be NO more than 300 words to be considered. Every word of the essay is counted. This does not include the title, bibliography or footnotes. Any quotations or copyrighted material used in the essay, video or Instagram submission must be identified properly. Failure to identify non-original material will result in disqualification. Instagram Contest finalists and Video Contest finalists will be disqualified if suspected of voter fraud or if entrant engages in any harassment towards other finalists, at the sole discretion of Travel For Teens.

Copyrighted Music in Your Videos

Please do NOT include copyrighted music in your video it will be automatically disqualified because it would be illegal for us to publish it on our website. All contest submissions must be the original work of the entrant, and any copyrighted material must be properly documented. If you want to set your video to music, please use non-copyrighted music, available for free from a variety of websites, including Free Music Archive  and Incompetech .

Eligibility

Contest is open to all students who are in grades 7–12 and between the ages of 13–18 years old, from around the world. Certain restrictions may apply, contest is not valid where not legal.  Travel For Teens requires a teacher, counselor or an advisor on every essay and video entry.  The faculty advisor must be able to speak on behalf of the entrant and will be contacted in the event of the entrant winning.  By submitting an entry, you are agreeing to Travel For Teens, terms and rules of the above mentioned contests.

Prizes

The winner will receive one all-inclusive Travel For Teens trip and will be offered the choice of the following trips: Costa Rica Surf and Service, Costa Rica Adventure and Service, Barcelona and Paris, or Sicily Community Service. All prizes and trips are subject to availability. The winner will be determined by a panel of experts including teachers and Travel For Teens employees. Their decision is final. Judging will be based on Persuasiveness and Originality.  The Instagram Contest and Video Contest winner will receive one trip each, exclusive of any airfare costs.

Travel For Teens reserves the right to publish or otherwise duplicate any essay or video entered into the contest. The grand prize trips are non-transferable and have no cash value.

21/05/2017

Posted In: NEWS

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