Cords: Emotional connections between individuals #metaphysics, #alchemy, #spiritual #awakening, #spiritual #transformation,


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Cords are made of astral and etheric energy and connect two people�s subtle bodies. They stretch between two people very much like an umbilical cord and transfer emotional energy and chi between the two. It does not matter how far away the other person is, as the cord is not a physical substance and distance is irrelevant, so it is still effective from the other side of the planet.

All babies have a cord going from their belly to their mother after the physical umbilical cord is cut. Some may have extra cords going from the heart, solar plexus or even the head to various parts of the mother�s energy body. The cord or cords that exist during infancy last for a few years and gradually drop off as the child becomes more independent from the mother and does not need the connection any more. Well ideally this would be the case, but here on Earth so many people have emotional issues that very often the cords can last well into adulthood. The cord is supposed to be there to support the baby but in actuality many mothers are emotionally needy and actually use the cord to nourish themselves from the baby�s fresh and abundant energy. Of course this is subconscious and the mother is not really meaning to do this. The baby is usually quite aware of what is happening and will even give the mother extra energy and emotional support through the cord at will. The baby is a very pure and loving being at this stage with only a small amount of astral incarnation and very little ego structure so they want to do all they can for the mother.

Unfortunately as the baby grows up it gradually loses its perception of such metaphysical things and so forgets about the cord. The transfer of emotional energy becomes subconscious for the child as well as the mother and continues to operate for possibly a very long time. Cords between mother and child that last for prolonged periods often cause serious friction between the two parties leading to dysfunctional feelings toward each other. The relationship will suffer as there is bound to be resentment and negative feelings. Imagine you have been drained of energy by your mother for 30 years through a cord that has become thick and gross with negative emotions and emotional neediness. You do not know exactly what is happening but you sense that somehow you are being drained by her. You move to another country to get away but wherever you go it almost feels like she is there with you – she is draining you from afar. This situation is just an example; there are many ways to interact through a cord.

Another common cord is between two lovers. Each wants to share their energy with the other and during sex this is amplified greatly. The feelings of love and sharing are often enough to build a cord. Often these cords are between the bellies but can be in other areas like the heart or solar plexus, etc. So when two people have been in an emotional relationship for a time there is a good chance that the two people have a cord. Depending on the emotional issues of the two, the cord can become gross or can stay fairly clean and be a good thing which helps the two with emotional nurturing. If one partner is needy it is likely that they will drain the other which could eventually lead to resentment by the drained partner. Some cords that become too gross can cause serious problems for a couple and could certainly lead to a break-up. Clearing a cord can help alleviate the emotional intensity so the couple can progress to a more balanced relationship. If a breakup does occur, the cord may stay for a long time and continue to operate, making it hard to let go and to move on with another partner. In this case clearing the cord can do wonders.

Cords can be created between any two people or even groups of people that have emotional relationships. Friends, workmates, enemies can all have cords. They can be used by entities and other dimensional beings to connect with us and drain our energy. It is possible to send a cord to someone you don’t know if you really want to get to know them. For example say you fall in love with someone but have not yet talked to them. It is possible that your desire to have them may send a cord into their energy. It is also possible to consciously create a cord to another person but this is in the domain of black magic. You should never use psychic means to purposely control or affect another�s energy without their permission. There are no exemptions from this rule and the karmic repercussions are enormous!

There are many types but whatever the case a cord is basically a connection between the astral and etheric bodies of two or more beings which allows for an exchange of emotional and/or etheric energy.

Fortunately all cords can be cleared fairly easily. It only takes one of the people to clear the cord and it will be cleared from the other. Through the practices learned in Past Life – Regression you can become aware of all your cords and learn to clear them. Interestingly while exploring a cord you can remember when and how it was created, how you felt about it and how it has been operating while it was there. Often cords can be seen and felt very tangibly and their effects become very apparent. As you enter the subconscious through the Third Eye you can actually remember what was happening in your subconscious during any part of your life. These can be excellent lessons in self exploration. See www.pastlife regression.com

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02/10/2017

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Consultant directory #consultants, #gps, #doctors, #surgeons, #anaesthetics, #burns #and #plastics, #cardiology,


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Consultant directory

With so many consultants, all with special interests, we appreciate it can be difficult for GPs to make the right referral choice, and it can be confusing for patients.

This consultant directory is offered as an easy reference guide to the specific clinical services and interests of all the consultants working at or for University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust.

Browse by category

Browse by category results: neurology

Dr Hani Benamer, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology Acute

Graduated from Tripoli. Obtained MRCP and neurology training in Glasgow. Gained PhD CCST. Special interest in movement disorders. Honorary lecturer at UoB with interest in medical education. Senior editor of Libyan Journal of Medicine.

Dr Nicholas P Davies, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology and Neuromuscular Conditions

Trained in Birmingham and the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London. Specialist interests include: Neuromuscular disorders, metabolic diseases and ion channel disorders.

Dr Roland O Etti, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology and Neuro Rehabilitation

Trained in neurology in Hull and Birmingham. Has an interest in general neurology, headaches and management of multiple sclerosis symptoms.

Dr Tom Hayton, Consultant Neurologist

MBChB from University of Edinburgh, PhD from UCL; trained in London and West Midlands;sub-speciality interest in traumatic brain injury.

Dr M Tom Heafield, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology Acute

Qualified at St Mary’s Hospital London in 1984, he was appointed to the Trust as consultant neurologist in 1994. He has a varied and broad interest in all aspects of clinical neurology and service developments.

Dr Saiju Jacob, Consultant Neurologist and Clinical Service Lead

Neurology training done in London and West Midlands with doctoral research and fellowship at Oxford. Special interest includes neuromuscular and neuroimmunology, with weekly clinics for each

Dr Alistair John Lewthwaite, Consultant Neurologist

Graduated from University of Birmingham, 2000. PhD in the Genetics of Parkinson’s Disease, 2009. Specialist interest in Parkinson’s Disease and other movement disorders, including assessment of patients for deep brain stimulation.

Dr Edward Littleton, Consultant Neurologist

Graduated from University College London (1996), having trained at Jesus College Cambridge and UCL medical school. Doctoral research in neuroimmunology undertaken at Oxford. Has a special interest in stroke.

Dr Gordon Mazibrada, Consultant Neurologist

Qualified as Doctor of Medicine from the University of Zagreb, Croatia in 1991. Professional areas of interest are multiple sclerosis and inflammatory disorders of the central nervous system.

Dr Dougall McCorry, Neuroscience Consultant

Trained at the Walton Centre, Liverpool, his MD is on the subject of understanding antiepileptic decision making. He is a member of the Association of British Neurology and International League Against Epilepsy.

Dr Niraj Mistry, Consultant Neurologist

Specialist interest MS. Clinical and pre-clinical training at the University of Cambridge, followed by basic Neurosciences training in Oxford then higher specialist Neurology training in Nottingham. Research MD from University of Cambridge.

Dr David Nicholl, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology Acute, Neuro-Genetics and Movement Disorders

Main research interests are in Parkinson’s disease and the genetics of neurodegenerative diseases. He also works at Birmingham City Hospital and lectures at the University of Birmingham.

Dr Hardev S Pall, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology Acute, Neurodegenerative and Parkinson’s Disease

Graduated from Bristol University in 1979. Had postgraduate training in Birmingham, London and Cambridge. Clinical interests in movement and motor neurone disorders. Has clinics for movement disorders and patients for deep brain stimulation surgery.

Professor Yusuf A Rajabally, Consultant Neurologist, Neuromuscular Disease and Peripheral Neuropathy

Main specialist interest in inflammatory neuropathy management. Runs several other specialist neuropathy clinics. Research active in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), Guillain-Barré syndrome and other acquired neuropathies.

Dr Vijay Sawlani, Consultant Neuroradiologist

Masters in neurovascular diseases, from the University of Paris and Mahidol. Interests include: advance applications of MRI including spectroscopy, perfusion, DTI and functional imaging in brain tumours, epilepsy and neurological disorders.

Dr Shanika Samarasekera, Consultant Neurologist

Graduated and trained in Newcastle and the West Midlands. Has a background in both Psychiatry (to membership level) and Neurology. Specialist interest in Epilepsy.

Dr Alexandra Sinclair, Consultant Neurologist

Graduated from the University of Birmingham in 2000 and obtained her MRCP in 2003, PhD in 2010 and her Certificate of Completion of Training in January 2012. Interests: headache and idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

Dr Imad N Soryal, Consultant in Rehabilitation, Medicine and Neurology

Qualified in Sudan in 1978. His specialties are in rehabilitation medicine and neurology.

Professor Steve Sturman, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology and Rehabilitation

A specialist in MS and Motor Assessment. he has interests in post-polio, head injuries, neuro-disabilities, stroke and neurorehabilitation.

Professor Adrian C Williams, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology Acute, Parkinson’s, MND

Professor of Clinical Neurology at the Regional Centre for Neurology at the Trust. He is also a senior advisor to the Parkinson’s Society.

Dr Mark Willmot, Consultant Neurologist with Interest in Stroke

Dr Willmot is a consultant neurologist with a sub-specialty interest in stroke. His interests involve the role of nitric oxide in the pathophysiology of stroke, patent foramen ovale in young stroke, blood pressure and the management of acute stroke.

Dr John B Winer, Consultant Neurologist, Neurology Acute, Neuromuscular Disorders and Polymyositis

Trained in Neurology at the Middlesex, Guy’s and St Mary’s hospitals in London, and the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery. Gained his first qualification in 1978. Current research is mainly focused on neuromuscular disease.

Dr John Woolmore, Consultant Neurologist

Clinical and research interests include multiple sclerosis and neuroinflammatory conditions of the central nervous system. He has two specialist clinics at the QE where his clinical focus is on disease modifying therapies within the field of MS care.

Dr Ben Wright. Consultant Neurologist

Graduated from University College London. Postgraduate training in Cambridge and Birmingham. Specialist interest in dystonia, Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders. I run the adult Wolfram syndrome multi-disciplinary clinic.

Contact us

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B15 2TH

Tel: 0121 627 2000

Queen Elizabeth
Hospital Birmingham

Mindelsohn Way
Edgbaston, Birmingham
B15 2GW

Tel: 0121 627 2000


07/09/2017

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Hives Treatments: Medications and Home Remedies #hives #treatment, #treat #hives, #hives,treatment,


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How Do You Treat Hives?

The first step in managing hives is to find out the cause. You can then try to avoid that trigger.

A mild case often disappears on its own after a few hours. If it lasts longer, you can try an over-the-counter antihistamine .

See a doctor if your outbreak doesn’t disappear in a few days, though. And get medical help right away if you notice symptoms of angioedema (such as swelling of the lips, tongue. or throat) or a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis ).

If you often get hives. or if your outbreaks affect you a lot, your doctor will probably prescribe antihistamines. Treatment with corticosteroids, which you take by mouth. will sometimes reduce swelling when antihistamines don’t work. But doctors usually save them for more severe cases. Your doctor may also consider a biologic drug, omalizumab (Xolair ), for chronic hives in people age 12 and over.

Home Remedies

If you’re severely allergic to bee stings or other insect bites. certain foods, or medications. ask your doctor about prescribing an emergency kit with epinephrine shots. You would use these to treat anaphylaxis. Always carry two epinephrine kits with you.

When to Call Your Doctor

Tell your doctor if you keep getting bouts of hives that last a month or more.

Call 911 or get emergency medical help immediately if any of these things happen:

1. You start to get burning or itchy welts in your throat.

2. You get hives and a dry throat, cough. cold sweats, nausea. dizziness. trouble breathing. or a sharp drop in blood pressure after a bee sting or insect bite or a new medication. This may be anaphylaxis. Give yourself an epinephrine shot, even if you’re unsure whether your symptoms are allergy related. It’s safe to use. You’ll still need medical attention even if your symptoms seem to stop.

3. You have symptoms of angioedema (again, that’s swelling of the lips, tongue. or throat). You need immediate medical attention so that it doesn’t block the air passage to the lungs .

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner, MD on 9/, 016

Sources

American College of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology: “All About Hives.”

American Academy of Dermatology: “Hives.”

MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: “Hives.”

© 2016 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.


06/09/2017

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Acid Reflux Symptoms: Heartburn, Regurgitation, Dyspepsia, and More #acid #reflux #symptoms,


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Acid Reflux Symptoms

Lots of people are intimately familiar with acid reflux symptoms. More than 60 million Americans experience acid reflux at least once a month. Acid reflux disease, also known as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD ), can produce a variety of symptoms.

What Are the Common Acid Reflux Symptoms?

Heartburn. regurgitation, and dyspepsia are a few of the most common acid reflux symptoms.

Heartburn. Also called acid indigestion. heartburn is a burning pain or discomfort that can move up from your stomach to the middle of your abdomen and chest. The pain can also move into your throat. Despite its name, heartburn doesn’t affect your heart .

Regurgitation. Another common symptom of acid reflux is regurgitation — or the sensation of acid backing up into your throat or mouth. Regurgitation can produce a sour or bitter taste, and you may experience a “wet burp” or even vomit some contents of your stomach .

Dyspepsia. Many people with acid reflux disease also have a syndrome called dyspepsia. Dyspepsia is a general term for stomach discomfort. Symptoms of dyspepsia include:

Symptoms of acid reflux may be a sign that stomach acid has inflamed your esophagus. When that happens, stomach acid can damage the lining of your esophagus and cause bleeding.

Although acid reflux is extremely common and rarely serious, don’t ignore your acid reflux symptoms. Making a few lifestyle changes and using over-the-counter antacids are often all you need to control acid reflux symptoms.

When Do Acid Reflux Symptoms Occur?

Acid reflux symptoms most often occur:

  • After eating a heavy meal
  • When bending over or lifting an object
  • When lying down, especially on your back

People who have frequent acid reflux symptoms most often experience them at night. Nighttime GERD also produces the most pain. However, the level of pain does not always indicate the degree of damage to your esophagus.

More than half of all pregnant women experience heartburn during pregnancy. Increased hormones and pressure from a growing fetus can combine to produce this acid reflux symptom. In most cases, heartburn goes away after delivery.

Continued

What Makes Acid Reflux Symptoms Worse?

Certain foods can make the symptoms of acid reflux worse for some people. To lessen your symptoms, try avoiding:

  • Citrus fruits
  • Chocolate
  • Caffeinated drinks or alcohol
  • Spicy, fatty, or fried foods
  • Garlic and onions
  • Peppermint
  • Tomatoes

Are There Potential Complications With Acid Reflux Symptoms?

Usually, acid reflux symptoms cause no complications. In a few cases, continued esophageal damage can lead to scarring, which may cause the esophagus to narrow. The narrowing creates strictures and makes it difficult to swallow. You may have dysphagia. a sensation that food is stuck in your esophagus. In some cases, normal cells in the lining of the esophagus may be replaced by a different type of cell. This is called Barrett’s esophagus. which can sometimes develop into cancer .

When Should I Call the Doctor With Acid Reflux Symptoms?

Be sure to call your doctor if you don’t get lasting relief from medications. Also call the doctor right away if you have any “alarm” acid reflux symptoms, such as these:

  • Unexpected weight loss
  • Blood in vomit
  • Black, tarry, or maroon-colored stools
  • Difficulty or pain with swallowing

Other acid reflux symptoms that should prompt a call to your doctor include:

Sometimes, people confuse the symptoms of heart attack with symptoms of acid reflux disease. That’s because pain in the chest can feel like heartburn. When in doubt, call your doctor.

  • Chest pain. pressure, or fullness lasting more than a few minutes or that goes away and comes back
  • Pain or discomfort in your neck, shoulder. upper back, or jaw
  • Shortness of breath, with or without chest pain
  • Dizziness. lightheadedness, or nausea
  • Sweating along with chest pain

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, DO, MS on February 22, 2016

Sources

SOURCES:
The American College of Gastroenterology: “Heartburn or Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.” University of Maryland Medical Center: “Gastroesophageal reflux disease and heartburn.” National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse: “Heartburn, Gastroesophageal Reflux (GER), and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.”

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Dyspepsia: What It Is and What to Do About It.”

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Heartburn: Hints on Dealing With the Discomfort.”

© 2016 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.


31/07/2017

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