Want To Work While Traveling The World For A Year? This

#traveling the world
#

Want To Work While Traveling The World For A Year? This Startup Might Be Able To Help

Remote Year says it will find you a job that lets you travel the world for a year. Is it too good to be true?

When 25-year-old Greg Caplan left his job at Groupon recently, he really wanted to spend some time traveling and working remotely, but ran into a few problems.

“I was able to find remote work, but it’s difficult to find friends to travel with,” he says. “The biggest issue is traveling alone. I thought it’d be lonely. I wanna go travel but I wanna do it with a community and in a more structured way.”

This predicament prompted him to launch Remote Year. which offers 100 remote workers an opportunity to travel together to 18 different locations over the course of a year.

Remote Year handles logistics like itinerary, lodging, and activities. And if participants don’t already have a job that allows them to work outside the office, Remote Year will help them find one. “People really, really want to do this type of program,” Caplan says. Indeed, just three days after the site went live earlier this month, Remote Year already had more than 3,000 inquiries from potential applicants, and 15 companies expressed interest in hiring workers that they may never actually meet in person.

In the past, taking a year to travel around the world might have also meant taking a year off work. But as digital tools make long-distance communication and coordination easier, location becomes less important. And many companies already encourage remote work, like Sawhorse Media. the technology company behind MuckRack and the Shorty Awards .

Of its staff of roughly 20, just half of those work in the New York headquarters. “We have people working for us from anywhere from LA to North Carolina to Canada and even Poland,” says CEO Greg Galant. “Some of them we never see. It’s an increasingly large trend because of the challenge of both finding the right talent and also the nature of work becoming easier to distribute. Half the tools we’re using didn’t exist just five or 10 years ago.”

Remote Year says it will help participants find a job “in virtually any field and for any level of experience.” By working with companies to find openings for people with specialized skill sets as well as entry-level employees, Caplan says he “will help ensure there is an opportunity that fits any background and skill set.” Caplan says Remote Year will organize local adventures in each country on the trip, as well as a designated work space at each location.

In return for serving as a de facto travel agent / employment agency, Remote Year takes a cut of its participants’ paychecks twice a month to cover the travel costs. It keeps some for itself, too, but Caplan is coy about just how much. “Remote Year will earn a small profit on the program, but the dollar / percentage is not set,” he says. “The fees will be stable for participants but costs might fluctuate.” In other words, participants will pay the same amount each month, but Remote Year’s cut of that amount will vary depending on travel costs.

Some people will have to switch jobs for this, but that’s totally fine. That could be a great fruitful experience anyway.

While it seems like a cool idea, there are a lot of gaps that need to filling, and the Remote Year website contains almost no information about what is a hugely ambitious project. Indeed, some of the most important details for potential applicants are unclear and it seems that Caplan doesn’t have the answers.

For example, how much will the trip cost? Caplan won’t say, but claims the minimum salary a traveler might need in order to pay Remote Year and have some leftover cash hovers around $35,000. “There’s gonna be people who go way outside that range,” he says. “People on Remote Year are not working for Remote Year. They’re a direct employee of a company.” Therefore, one’s pay will vary based on experience and type of work.

Also not clear yet are which 18 locations Remote Year members will travel to. And Caplan is tight-lipped about how he’s choosing “the most interesting 100 people” out of thousands of applicants for this inaugural trip. But he does insist diversity is a high priority. “I want first of all, most importantly, diversity on the program. People from different countries, backgrounds, education, skill sets, marital status. I have a married couple that said ‘Is it possible to come if you’re married?’ I think that sounds awesome.”

Of course, many married couples won’t be able to travel the world for a year, even if their bosses are cool with it. And while teleworking is indeed becoming more commonplace, it isn’t feasible in some industries. “Some people will have to switch jobs for this, but that’s totally fine,” Caplan says. “That could be a great fruitful experience anyway.”

What if people don’t get along? Putting 100 strangers in close proximity (Caplan says sometimes they’ll have to share rooms) is a recipe for disagreements. The hope is that sheer size of the group will ensure everyone has a friend. And if they don’t want to participate in planned activities, they won’t have to. “They are totally free to go do whatever they want whenever they want,” Caplan says.

Galant, from Sawhorse Media, says he’d certainly consider letting employees enroll in Remote Year, so long as they kept producing good work. “You just wanna work with really talented people,” he says. “It doesn’t really matter where they are.”

But since Caplan won’t say what requirements applicants will have to meet, it’s not clear from an employer’s perspective just how talented Remote Year members will be. Caplan says he is “strongly curating” group members, but simply being chosen from a large group of applicants doesn’t carry much weight, it’s why you were chosen that’s important.

Are Remote Year workers special because they have a sense of adventure? Will they boast particularly unique skill sets? Can Remote Year vouch for their work ethic? On this, Caplan says only that “the first inaugural batch is gonna be highly filtered, so it’s gonna be people that really want it.”

For a company whose livelihood depends on its limited number of annual members getting consistent paychecks, Caplan seems surprisingly unconcerned with making sure the jobs are secure and the workers are reliable. “We don’t have the specific terms of the program set around canceling and situations such as losing their job, and we will handle those type of situations on a case-by-case basis,” he says.

So far it’s just Caplan and his big idea, but his goal is to have five full-time employees dedicated to the logistics of looking after 100 people and ensuring each pitstop provides a suitable workspace.

He’ll have to straighten out all of this ambiguity soon, the inaugural trip leaves in just nine months on June 1, 2015. The program will open to applicants over the next few months, and it sounds like a lot of people will be waiting to sign up.





24/11/2017

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Is it possible to book a cheap flight the same day

#book a flight cheap
#

is it possible to book a cheap flight the same day you want to leave?

Isn’t this called flying standby. I’ve never done it before but I’m pretty sure this is what stand-by is.

Standby is when you have an existing ticket for a different flight and then go to the gate of an earlier one so you can try to take any of their extra spots.

You might want to try and Priceline?

Standby is when you have an existing ticket for a different flight and then go to the gate of an earlier one so you can try to take any of their extra spots.

No, you can fly standby by having a cheaper, standby ticket, where you turn up for your booked flight but only get on if there are spaces not taken by passengers with regular tickets. If there aren’t spaces, you are bumped to the next flight and the same thing happens again.

Flying standby is an option. I’ve noticed you can sometimes get cheap last minute flights as airlines hate flying with empty seats, but with the whole American Airlines craziness going on at the moment I imagine every other airline is nicely full up and isn’t going to drop seat prices when they can get all the paniced AA customers who missed flights business.

posted by wwax at 8:24 AM on October 11, 2012

Ah, my bad.

Poster, please be aware – as I recently wasn’t – that airlines have a window before the flight where they won’t sell you tickets, for security reasons. When it came up, I was told 4 hours online, 2 hours in the airport, but I can’t find good documentation online – I would confirm with your intended airline as one of your pre-planning steps, here.

Yes, it is possible if the flight is quite empty and/or there is competition on the route. Otherwise, the last seats on the plane are generally expensive because they are catering to walk ons like you. The block of cheaper ones have typically been sold earlier – either very early on or in demand-based promotional activity designed to shift seats on a low-demand flight. Most airlines are – it goes without saying – good at optimising revenue per passenger or they tend to go out of business.

This is not the same as flying standby, which basically is the airline retaining the option to bump you off a full flight and onto a later one with availability.

posted by MuffinMan at 8:27 AM on October 11, 2012

Technically, about 24 hours before a flight, the seats get released and then are in control of the online system and the gate agent system. So you can’t get same-day flights on the phone, usually, or you can, for a crazy price, but you CAN get them online but, most easily, at the airport. It’s a crapshoot! Often you won’t see a price drop same-day online, but you might improve at the airport. (Just checked AA’s prices to Miami from NYC for today online; not great at all.) Or not!

Airlines don’t want to fly empty seats, but they also don’t want to set precedent where people wait until the very last minute to get a cheap seat.

Also, the funeral and medical emergencies crowd pay top dollar for last minute seats.

Orbitz right now show tix at $310 one way, from LaGuardia to SFO. That’s as good as you’re going to get.

I checked Priceline and US Airways has a round trip, returning a week from now, and it’s $675 RT, with a return next Thursday.

C’mon, that’s pretty damn good.

You want to search for Last minute airfare.

There are more if you Google. Looks like you can fly tomorrow into San Jose for $295.

Also, weekends are the best time to look for these kinds of deals, since business travelers tend to fill up the weekday travel slots.

We took our first anniversary trip via a last minute airfare. Just decided to wait and see what was cheap that weekend and boom, off we went.

Historically same day flights are the most expensive as the airlines know you want to fly. In business class their was a riddle; What’s the only thing that gets more expensive the closer it gets to its expiry date? An airline ticket.

My intro to econ prof also mentioned this. He said that he doesn’t understand why airlines don’t have an auction / standby section at the gate when flights leave. If there are free seats, whoever wants to pay the most get to go (this was in the days before Crazy Security).

But airlines don’t have that infrastructure, so I think the short answer is you gotta be bffs with a flight attendant . OTOH, kayak is showing $300 standby tickets for 4:25pm from jfk (the time is now 2:32) with one stop in philly. That seems pretty reasonable to me.





21/09/2017

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You want the best flight deal? Google it – Feb. 25,

#best deals on airfare
#

You want the best flight deal? Google it

Google’s “Flights” search tool makes finding the best airfare deal significantly easier.

The prices that Google ( GOOGL. Tech30 ) shows will appear in gray and green (green for lowest).

When you click on the day you want to travel, Google will list the flights for that date in order of cost, grouping together all the times when you can fly at the lowest price.

If you’re curious about what time of the year flights between two cities are the lowest, Google Flights can show you a bar chart that will give you a glimpse of the best prices throughout the year.

Google Flights is the best tool to find the cheapest airfare.

Maybe you know when you want to fly, but you’re not sure where to go? Google Flights has an interactive map that will show you prices for destinations around the world.

You can also search for generic terms, such as “flights to Europe” or “flights to Mexico.” Google Flights also has an “I’m feeling lucky” button that will suggest popular destinations and other locations based on your search history.

Google said it found that 54% of people don’t know where they want to travel when they decide to plan their vacations.

What Google doesn’t show is whether prices will drop in the near future. Microsoft Bing and Kayak provide services that predict when prices are expected to rise or fall.

But Google said those tools aren’t typically very helpful.

“Though it’s sometimes hard to pull the trigger because you’re afraid the price will drop tomorrow (or next Tuesday, maybe?), our experience shows it’s usually best to book right away,” said Eric Zimmerman, Google Flights product manager, in a blog post.

In 2011, Google purchased a company called ITA. which provides flight information to websites, such as Expedia ( EXPE ). Kayak, Hipmunk and Priceline ( PCLN. Tech30 ). The data Google controls includes flight times, availability and prices.

Competitors Kayak and Expedia initially opposed the deal before the Department of Justice forced Google to promise that it would continue to promote competition.





16/08/2017

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11 Travel Tips Italians Want You To Know #travel #supermarket

#travel to italy
#

11 Travel Tips Italians Want You To Know

Apr 09, 2014 | Updated Jun 09, 2014

Lisa Condie Owner of Find Yourself In Tuscany

Over 46 million tourists visit the boot-shaped peninsula each year! They come from all over the world, and many return again and again for a magic that only Italy can deliver.

As Samuel Johnson said, “A man who has not been in Italy, is always conscious of an inferiority, from his not having seen what it is expected a man should see.”

Italians are very kind, and extremely patient (unless they’re driving). They are the guardians of some of history’s most magnificent treasures, and they are used to sharing them. However, there are a few things Italians want Americans to know before you arrive in their country:

1. Dinner: It’s between 7:30-9:00 p.m. Pressing your hungry face to the restaurant’s window at 6:00 p.m. will not change that. Calling for a reservation, and dressing up for dinner, however, will be appreciated.

2. Skin: Not shown so much in Italy. Short skirts, daisy dukes and halter tops do not epitomize the classical fashion taste of Italians. So cover up, unless, of course, you really are at the beach.

3. Bread: It won’t be served with oil and balsamic vinegar (unless the restaurant caters to Americans), so resist asking the server to provide them. Also, bread is not to be eaten with pasta. It’s used to “fare la scarpetta” or “make a little shoe”, to clean the plate of sauce. To do so in a restaurant is a debatable point, so I will let you make that decision! Basically, bread is provided to accompany an appetizer.

4. Simplify Your Schedule: Leave time to wander the crooked, ancient streets on your own. Often, just a few blocks from the main attractions, day-to-day life is unfolding. Leave the crowds. Pause to listen to a street performer. Plan some time where you can get off the well beaten path for a gelato, coffee, or traditional meal with the locals. Besides, if you over schedule, you just get grumpy.

5. Afternoon Closings: This still surprises and perplexes Americans. Many shops will close down for the afternoon from 1:00-4:00 p.m. especially outside the city center. Italians go home to enjoy lunch as a family and relax. Try it!

6. Taxis: You need to call for a taxi, or go to an actual taxi stand. You cannot hail a cab on a street in Italy, although it’s amusing to watch Americans try! The taxi service in Florence is amazingly efficient and punctual, especially when compared to the post office.

7. Italian: It’s what is spoken! Learning a few words and common phrases will make a big difference in your experience. Rather than launching immediately in English, and assuming you will be understood, it’s polite to ask, “Parla l’Inglese?”

8. Coperto: The amount charged, per person, to sit down at a table. It’s not a ploy to take advantage of you because you are a tourist. While a coperto is not the same thing as a tip, tipping in Italy is not necessary, and never more than 5-10 percent.

9. Ask for the Check: It won’t be automatically delivered to your table after a meal in a restaurant. That doesn’t mean you are being ignored. Food and conversations are to be enjoyed, not rushed. When you are ready to leave, ask for the bill, “il conto.”

10. Slow Down: You can’t see it all. Trust me on this one. The reason 46 million tourists descend on Italy each year is because there is so much beauty to see and experience. A plethora of culture, art, vineyards, food, and museums — a lifetime is not enough. So, slow down, savor and appreciate what you do see.

11. Smile: You’ve made it to a country that has inspired visitors for centuries. Melt into its beauty and lifestyle, its art, music, and literature. Trade smiles with Italians and take home memories of a truly magnificent country, unlike any other in the world.





12/08/2017

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Want to be an instant travel agent? Beware! Travel – Travel

#becoming a travel agent
#

Questions to ask before you jump into a potentially sketchy situation

“BE A PART OF AMERICA’S FASTEST GROWING INDUSTRY — Earn thousands of dollars a month — from your home — selling travel. “

Don’t miss these Travel stories

With teams using more than 100 unique apparatuses to launch globular projectiles a half-mile or more, the 27th annual World Championship Punkin Chunkin event is our pick as November’s Weird Festival of the Month.

You can find ads like that everywhere from the telephone pole on your corner to your grocery store bulletin board to your daily newspaper.

While you may find these ads appealing, especially if you can’t work outside your home, proceed with caution. Not all work-at-home opportunities deliver on their promises. As a matter of fact, most don’t. And that’s especially true in travel.

In the past, the “standard” get-rich-quick schemes involved stuffing envelopes, assembling crafts, or medical billing. But today, it seems that travel opportunities are fast climbing to the top of the list.

Three years ago, I wrote a column on travel scams and “Becoming A Travel Agent” was in the top five. Unfortunately, things have not changed.

Each month, I get 10 or 12 emails inviting me to participate in some new travel scheme. Very few, if any, are legitimate. Consumers deceived by these ads have lost thousands of dollars, in addition to their time and energy.

Some are “travel clubs” where you pay a membership fee for “discounted” travel, but I would like to focus on the new scourge of the industry — the “Business Opportunity.”





08/07/2017

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Want To Work While Traveling The World For A Year? This

#traveling the world
#

Want To Work While Traveling The World For A Year? This Startup Might Be Able To Help

Remote Year says it will find you a job that lets you travel the world for a year. Is it too good to be true?

When 25-year-old Greg Caplan left his job at Groupon recently, he really wanted to spend some time traveling and working remotely, but ran into a few problems.

“I was able to find remote work, but it’s difficult to find friends to travel with,” he says. “The biggest issue is traveling alone. I thought it’d be lonely. I wanna go travel but I wanna do it with a community and in a more structured way.”

This predicament prompted him to launch Remote Year. which offers 100 remote workers an opportunity to travel together to 18 different locations over the course of a year.

Remote Year handles logistics like itinerary, lodging, and activities. And if participants don’t already have a job that allows them to work outside the office, Remote Year will help them find one. “People really, really want to do this type of program,” Caplan says. Indeed, just three days after the site went live earlier this month, Remote Year already had more than 3,000 inquiries from potential applicants, and 15 companies expressed interest in hiring workers that they may never actually meet in person.

In the past, taking a year to travel around the world might have also meant taking a year off work. But as digital tools make long-distance communication and coordination easier, location becomes less important. And many companies already encourage remote work, like Sawhorse Media. the technology company behind MuckRack and the Shorty Awards .

Of its staff of roughly 20, just half of those work in the New York headquarters. “We have people working for us from anywhere from LA to North Carolina to Canada and even Poland,” says CEO Greg Galant. “Some of them we never see. It’s an increasingly large trend because of the challenge of both finding the right talent and also the nature of work becoming easier to distribute. Half the tools we’re using didn’t exist just five or 10 years ago.”

Remote Year says it will help participants find a job “in virtually any field and for any level of experience.” By working with companies to find openings for people with specialized skill sets as well as entry-level employees, Caplan says he “will help ensure there is an opportunity that fits any background and skill set.” Caplan says Remote Year will organize local adventures in each country on the trip, as well as a designated work space at each location.

In return for serving as a de facto travel agent / employment agency, Remote Year takes a cut of its participants’ paychecks twice a month to cover the travel costs. It keeps some for itself, too, but Caplan is coy about just how much. “Remote Year will earn a small profit on the program, but the dollar / percentage is not set,” he says. “The fees will be stable for participants but costs might fluctuate.” In other words, participants will pay the same amount each month, but Remote Year’s cut of that amount will vary depending on travel costs.

Some people will have to switch jobs for this, but that’s totally fine. That could be a great fruitful experience anyway.

While it seems like a cool idea, there are a lot of gaps that need to filling, and the Remote Year website contains almost no information about what is a hugely ambitious project. Indeed, some of the most important details for potential applicants are unclear and it seems that Caplan doesn’t have the answers.

For example, how much will the trip cost? Caplan won’t say, but claims the minimum salary a traveler might need in order to pay Remote Year and have some leftover cash hovers around $35,000. “There’s gonna be people who go way outside that range,” he says. “People on Remote Year are not working for Remote Year. They’re a direct employee of a company.” Therefore, one’s pay will vary based on experience and type of work.

Also not clear yet are which 18 locations Remote Year members will travel to. And Caplan is tight-lipped about how he’s choosing “the most interesting 100 people” out of thousands of applicants for this inaugural trip. But he does insist diversity is a high priority. “I want first of all, most importantly, diversity on the program. People from different countries, backgrounds, education, skill sets, marital status. I have a married couple that said ‘Is it possible to come if you’re married?’ I think that sounds awesome.”

Of course, many married couples won’t be able to travel the world for a year, even if their bosses are cool with it. And while teleworking is indeed becoming more commonplace, it isn’t feasible in some industries. “Some people will have to switch jobs for this, but that’s totally fine,” Caplan says. “That could be a great fruitful experience anyway.”

What if people don’t get along? Putting 100 strangers in close proximity (Caplan says sometimes they’ll have to share rooms) is a recipe for disagreements. The hope is that sheer size of the group will ensure everyone has a friend. And if they don’t want to participate in planned activities, they won’t have to. “They are totally free to go do whatever they want whenever they want,” Caplan says.

Galant, from Sawhorse Media, says he’d certainly consider letting employees enroll in Remote Year, so long as they kept producing good work. “You just wanna work with really talented people,” he says. “It doesn’t really matter where they are.”

But since Caplan won’t say what requirements applicants will have to meet, it’s not clear from an employer’s perspective just how talented Remote Year members will be. Caplan says he is “strongly curating” group members, but simply being chosen from a large group of applicants doesn’t carry much weight, it’s why you were chosen that’s important.

Are Remote Year workers special because they have a sense of adventure? Will they boast particularly unique skill sets? Can Remote Year vouch for their work ethic? On this, Caplan says only that “the first inaugural batch is gonna be highly filtered, so it’s gonna be people that really want it.”

For a company whose livelihood depends on its limited number of annual members getting consistent paychecks, Caplan seems surprisingly unconcerned with making sure the jobs are secure and the workers are reliable. “We don’t have the specific terms of the program set around canceling and situations such as losing their job, and we will handle those type of situations on a case-by-case basis,” he says.

So far it’s just Caplan and his big idea, but his goal is to have five full-time employees dedicated to the logistics of looking after 100 people and ensuring each pitstop provides a suitable workspace.

He’ll have to straighten out all of this ambiguity soon, the inaugural trip leaves in just nine months on June 1, 2015. The program will open to applicants over the next few months, and it sounds like a lot of people will be waiting to sign up.





20/05/2017

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You want the best flight deal? Google it – Feb. 25,

#best deals on airfare
#

You want the best flight deal? Google it

Google’s “Flights” search tool makes finding the best airfare deal significantly easier.

The prices that Google ( GOOGL. Tech30 ) shows will appear in gray and green (green for lowest).

When you click on the day you want to travel, Google will list the flights for that date in order of cost, grouping together all the times when you can fly at the lowest price.

If you’re curious about what time of the year flights between two cities are the lowest, Google Flights can show you a bar chart that will give you a glimpse of the best prices throughout the year.

Google Flights is the best tool to find the cheapest airfare.

Maybe you know when you want to fly, but you’re not sure where to go? Google Flights has an interactive map that will show you prices for destinations around the world.

You can also search for generic terms, such as “flights to Europe” or “flights to Mexico.” Google Flights also has an “I’m feeling lucky” button that will suggest popular destinations and other locations based on your search history.

Google said it found that 54% of people don’t know where they want to travel when they decide to plan their vacations.

What Google doesn’t show is whether prices will drop in the near future. Microsoft Bing and Kayak provide services that predict when prices are expected to rise or fall.

But Google said those tools aren’t typically very helpful.

“Though it’s sometimes hard to pull the trigger because you’re afraid the price will drop tomorrow (or next Tuesday, maybe?), our experience shows it’s usually best to book right away,” said Eric Zimmerman, Google Flights product manager, in a blog post.

In 2011, Google purchased a company called ITA. which provides flight information to websites, such as Expedia ( EXPE ). Kayak, Hipmunk and Priceline ( PCLN. Tech30 ). The data Google controls includes flight times, availability and prices.

Competitors Kayak and Expedia initially opposed the deal before the Department of Justice forced Google to promise that it would continue to promote competition.





10/04/2017

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Want to be an instant travel agent? Beware! Travel – Travel

#becoming a travel agent
#

Questions to ask before you jump into a potentially sketchy situation

“BE A PART OF AMERICA’S FASTEST GROWING INDUSTRY — Earn thousands of dollars a month — from your home — selling travel. “

Don’t miss these Travel stories

With teams using more than 100 unique apparatuses to launch globular projectiles a half-mile or more, the 27th annual World Championship Punkin Chunkin event is our pick as November’s Weird Festival of the Month.

You can find ads like that everywhere from the telephone pole on your corner to your grocery store bulletin board to your daily newspaper.

While you may find these ads appealing, especially if you can’t work outside your home, proceed with caution. Not all work-at-home opportunities deliver on their promises. As a matter of fact, most don’t. And that’s especially true in travel.

In the past, the “standard” get-rich-quick schemes involved stuffing envelopes, assembling crafts, or medical billing. But today, it seems that travel opportunities are fast climbing to the top of the list.

Three years ago, I wrote a column on travel scams and “Becoming A Travel Agent” was in the top five. Unfortunately, things have not changed.

Each month, I get 10 or 12 emails inviting me to participate in some new travel scheme. Very few, if any, are legitimate. Consumers deceived by these ads have lost thousands of dollars, in addition to their time and energy.

Some are “travel clubs” where you pay a membership fee for “discounted” travel, but I would like to focus on the new scourge of the industry — the “Business Opportunity.”





06/04/2017

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Is it possible to book a cheap flight the same day

#book a flight cheap
#

is it possible to book a cheap flight the same day you want to leave?

Isn’t this called flying standby. I’ve never done it before but I’m pretty sure this is what stand-by is.

Standby is when you have an existing ticket for a different flight and then go to the gate of an earlier one so you can try to take any of their extra spots.

You might want to try and Priceline?

Standby is when you have an existing ticket for a different flight and then go to the gate of an earlier one so you can try to take any of their extra spots.

No, you can fly standby by having a cheaper, standby ticket, where you turn up for your booked flight but only get on if there are spaces not taken by passengers with regular tickets. If there aren’t spaces, you are bumped to the next flight and the same thing happens again.

Flying standby is an option. I’ve noticed you can sometimes get cheap last minute flights as airlines hate flying with empty seats, but with the whole American Airlines craziness going on at the moment I imagine every other airline is nicely full up and isn’t going to drop seat prices when they can get all the paniced AA customers who missed flights business.

posted by wwax at 8:24 AM on October 11, 2012

Ah, my bad.

Poster, please be aware – as I recently wasn’t – that airlines have a window before the flight where they won’t sell you tickets, for security reasons. When it came up, I was told 4 hours online, 2 hours in the airport, but I can’t find good documentation online – I would confirm with your intended airline as one of your pre-planning steps, here.

Yes, it is possible if the flight is quite empty and/or there is competition on the route. Otherwise, the last seats on the plane are generally expensive because they are catering to walk ons like you. The block of cheaper ones have typically been sold earlier – either very early on or in demand-based promotional activity designed to shift seats on a low-demand flight. Most airlines are – it goes without saying – good at optimising revenue per passenger or they tend to go out of business.

This is not the same as flying standby, which basically is the airline retaining the option to bump you off a full flight and onto a later one with availability.

posted by MuffinMan at 8:27 AM on October 11, 2012

Technically, about 24 hours before a flight, the seats get released and then are in control of the online system and the gate agent system. So you can’t get same-day flights on the phone, usually, or you can, for a crazy price, but you CAN get them online but, most easily, at the airport. It’s a crapshoot! Often you won’t see a price drop same-day online, but you might improve at the airport. (Just checked AA’s prices to Miami from NYC for today online; not great at all.) Or not!

Airlines don’t want to fly empty seats, but they also don’t want to set precedent where people wait until the very last minute to get a cheap seat.

Also, the funeral and medical emergencies crowd pay top dollar for last minute seats.

Orbitz right now show tix at $310 one way, from LaGuardia to SFO. That’s as good as you’re going to get.

I checked Priceline and US Airways has a round trip, returning a week from now, and it’s $675 RT, with a return next Thursday.

C’mon, that’s pretty damn good.

You want to search for Last minute airfare.

There are more if you Google. Looks like you can fly tomorrow into San Jose for $295.

Also, weekends are the best time to look for these kinds of deals, since business travelers tend to fill up the weekday travel slots.

We took our first anniversary trip via a last minute airfare. Just decided to wait and see what was cheap that weekend and boom, off we went.

Historically same day flights are the most expensive as the airlines know you want to fly. In business class their was a riddle; What’s the only thing that gets more expensive the closer it gets to its expiry date? An airline ticket.

My intro to econ prof also mentioned this. He said that he doesn’t understand why airlines don’t have an auction / standby section at the gate when flights leave. If there are free seats, whoever wants to pay the most get to go (this was in the days before Crazy Security).

But airlines don’t have that infrastructure, so I think the short answer is you gotta be bffs with a flight attendant . OTOH, kayak is showing $300 standby tickets for 4:25pm from jfk (the time is now 2:32) with one stop in philly. That seems pretty reasonable to me.





19/03/2017

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